Ph.D. Program in Clinical Psychology

Depth Psychology & Humanities Courses

These classes stimulate dialogue among the traditions of clinical psychology, depth psychology, and cultural studies. The student is encouraged to understand that a wide variety of cultural sources inform the craft of psychotherapy. Literature, myth, history, and art infuse the science of clinical psychology with an essential sense of our connection to the recurring archetypal motifs of the psyche.


Introduction to Depth Psychology and the Human Science Traditions
CL 819......................1 Unit
This course is a scholarly introduction to the theories and traditions of depth psychology. The cultural-historical contexts of depth psychology's development, along with its relation to philosophy, science, art, religion, myth, and literature will be explored. Attention is given to the origins of depth psychology in the works of Sigmund Freud and C.G. Jung, the traditions that followed, and contemporary developments in the field. Students will be introduced to current research—clinical, theoretical, and cultural—and publication in depth psychology with a focus on the contributions of Pacific Graduate Institute and its faculty. The scholar-practitioner model of education in depth psychology will be elaborated.

Myth, Literature, and Religious Studies
CL 820......................1 Unit

Mythology, literature, and religious traditions provide images and motifs which vividly reflect the underlying patterns of psychological life. This course focuses upon the study of symbolic experience and may include ancient and modern dramatic literature, scriptural narratives from multicultural sources, philosophy, poetry or accounts of personal religious experience. The course helps students develop the attitude and skills necessary to discern the aesthetic, affective, and dramatic dimensions of symbolic texts and to present such findings in clear scholarly writing.

Jungian-Based Psychotherapy I
CP 810......................2 Units

Classical Jungian concepts such as ego, Self, persona, shadow, anima/animus, archetype, collective unconscious, transcendent function, and individuation are studied. Clinical application of Jungian thought is demonstrated through theoretical discussions, case examples, and the reading of primary sources. Particular attention is brought to understanding how various forms of psychopathology can be imagined as manifestations of ego-Self axis dynamics. Critiques from postmodern and multicultural perspectives are covered.

Cultural Foundations of Depth Psychology I
CL 723......................1 Unit

This course focuses on the formative contexts which have given rise to depth psychology. For example, healing systems from different cultures and the archetypal images they evoke are studied to provide a deeper appreciation of contemporary clinical practice. Other emphases include an examination of cultural and historical issues which have shaped the emergence of depth psychology. Philosophical antecedents of depth psychology are a focus of study as well as the relationship between depth psychology, the arts, and poetic imagination. The implications of depth psychology for a multicultural world are discussed.

Psychoanalytic-Based Psychotherapy I
CP 711......................2 units

This course focuses on the evolution of psychoanalytic thought from Freud's seminal writings through British traditions of Object Relations, up to and including contemporary Self and intersubjective approaches. Working within the transferencecountertransference field is a major focus.

Psychoanalytic-Based Psychotherapy II
CP 712......................2 units

This course continues to examine psychoanalytic theory and practice, including a focus on cultural dimensions of practice. In particular, the contributions of Klein and Bion, who helped to delineate the dynamics and treatment of Borderline and Psychotic conditions. Prerequisite: CP 711

Archetypal Psychology: Theory and Practice
CP 840......................2 units

Students re-vision basic psychological concepts through the study of archetypal psychology as exemplified in the works of James Hillman. Emphasis is placed on the development of a mythic sensibility in confronting the complexity of psychological life. Subjective and imaginal realities are considered as they relate to therapeutic intervention. The therapy room is extended to include the wider realm of the collective imagination, the arts, culture, multicultural reflections, and philosophy.

Depth Psychology and Contemporary Culture I
CL 920......................1 unit

This course applies the principles of depth psychology to addressing various crises in contemporary society. Activist, social justice, and community fieldwork manifestations of depth psychology are presented. Postmodern critiques are discussed, and depth psychological theory and clinical practice are viewed through non-Western, post-colonial, and minority perspectives. Individual psychopathology is seen as having collective, historic, and contextual sources. Symbolic healing is explored at community and societal levels.

Jungian-Based Psychotherapy II
CL 811......................2 Units

This course will continue to expand knowledge of classical Jungian concepts such as the individuated ego, personal and collective shadow, the contra-sexual archetypes anima/ animus, manifestations of the Self, dreams and numinous experiences, and their application to clinical practice. In addition, typology will be examined, other archetypal figures and patterns explored, and the use of myths in depth psychotherapy elaborated. Students will also continue the work of self-reflection and furthering their individuation process as central to their work as clinical depth psychologists. Prerequisite: CP 810

Post-Jungian Psychotherapy: Theory and Practice
CP 745......................2 units

The works of Post-Jungian psychotherapists such as Fordham, Samuels, and Jacobi are studied. Issues of transference and ego development are explored. Recent post-Jungian research and diversity considerations are discussed. Prerequisites: CP 810, CL 811

Imaginal Psychotherapy
CP 814......................2 units

Utilizing a phenomenological attitude, which is attentive to the process of psychotherapy and to the experience of being a psychotherapist and doing psychotherapy, an imaginal approach is developed. Within this approach, issues such as transference, the unconscious, symptoms, and dreams are examined. Special attention is paid to the development of those imaginal capabilities which foster sensitivity to the symbolic depths and metaphorical richness of the patient's and therapist's ways of using language. Diversity and cultural considerations are discussed in these contexts.

Cultural Foundations of Depth Psychology II
CL 724......................2 Units

This course continues to focus on the formative contexts which have given rise to depth psychology. For example, healing systems from different cultures and the archetypal images they evoke are studied to provide a deeper appreciation of contemporary clinical practice. Other emphases include an examination of cultural and historical issues which have shaped the emergence of depth psychology. Philosophical antecedents of depth psychology are a focus of study as well as the relationship between depth psychology, the arts, and poetic imagination. The implications of depth psychology for a multicultural world are discussed.

Depth Psychology and Contemporary Culture II
CL 921......................1 unit

This course considers the role of depth psychology in contemporary culture and explores the cutting edges of depth psychology. Topics may include current works in transpersonal psychology, psychology and quantum physics, spirituality, body/mind studies, alternative healing forms, and the latest research in the field.

 
Ph.D. Clinical Psychology