Background: #fff
Foreground: #000
PrimaryPale: #8cf
PrimaryLight: #18f
PrimaryMid: #04b
PrimaryDark: #014
SecondaryPale: #ffc
SecondaryLight: #fe8
SecondaryMid: #db4
SecondaryDark: #841
TertiaryPale: #eee
TertiaryLight: #ccc
TertiaryMid: #999
TertiaryDark: #666
Error: #f88
/*{{{*/
body {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}

a {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
a:hover {background-color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
a img {border:0;}

h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]]; background:transparent;}
h1 {border-bottom:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
h2,h3 {border-bottom:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}

.button {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; border-color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}
.button:active {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}

.header {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.headerShadow {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.headerShadow a {font-weight:normal; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.headerForeground {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.headerForeground a {font-weight:normal; color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}

.tabSelected{color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];
	background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]];
	border-left:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];
	border-top:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];
	border-right:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];
}
.tabUnselected {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.tabContents {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.tabContents .button {border:0;}

#sidebar {}
#sidebarOptions input {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {border:none;color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:active {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}

.wizard {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.wizard h1 {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border:none;}
.wizard h2 {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border:none;}
.wizardStep {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];
	border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.wizardStep.wizardStepDone {background::[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.wizardFooter {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}
.wizardFooter .status {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.wizard .button {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; border: 1px solid;
	border-color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]] [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.wizard .button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.wizard .button:active {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: 1px solid;
	border-color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}

#messageArea {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#messageArea .button {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]]; border:none;}

.popupTiddler {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.popup {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; border-left:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border-top:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border-right:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; border-bottom:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.popup hr {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border-bottom:1px;}
.popup li.disabled {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.popup li a, .popup li a:visited {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popup li a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popup li a:active {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popupHighlight {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.listBreak div {border-bottom:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.tiddler .defaultCommand {font-weight:bold;}

.shadow .title {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.title {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}
.subtitle {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.toolbar {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.toolbar a {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.selected .toolbar a {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.selected .toolbar a:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}

.tagging, .tagged {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; background-color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]];}
.selected .tagging, .selected .tagged {background-color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.tagging .listTitle, .tagged .listTitle {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}
.tagging .button, .tagged .button {border:none;}

.footer {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.selected .footer {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.sparkline {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]]; border:0;}
.sparktick {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}

.error, .errorButton {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Error]];}
.warning {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.lowlight {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}

.zoomer {background:none; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border:3px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.imageLink, #displayArea .imageLink {background:transparent;}

.annotation {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}

.viewer .listTitle {list-style-type:none; margin-left:-2em;}
.viewer .button {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}
.viewer blockquote {border-left:3px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.viewer table, table.twtable {border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.viewer th, .viewer thead td, .twtable th, .twtable thead td {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.viewer td, .viewer tr, .twtable td, .twtable tr {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.viewer pre {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.viewer code {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}
.viewer hr {border:0; border-top:dashed 1px [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.highlight, .marked {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]];}

.editor input {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.editor textarea {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; width:100%;}
.editorFooter {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

#backstageArea {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
#backstageArea a {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstageArea a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; }
#backstageArea a.backstageSelTab {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#backstageButton a {background:none; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstageButton a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstagePanel {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border-color: [[ColorPalette::Background]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.backstagePanelFooter .button {border:none; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.backstagePanelFooter .button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#backstageCloak {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; opacity:0.6; filter:'alpha(opacity:60)';}
/*}}}*/
/*{{{*/
* html .tiddler {height:1%;}

body {font-size:.75em; font-family:arial,helvetica; margin:0; padding:0;}

h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {font-weight:bold; text-decoration:none;}
h1,h2,h3 {padding-bottom:1px; margin-top:1.2em;margin-bottom:0.3em;}
h4,h5,h6 {margin-top:1em;}
h1 {font-size:1.35em;}
h2 {font-size:1.25em;}
h3 {font-size:1.1em;}
h4 {font-size:1em;}
h5 {font-size:.9em;}

hr {height:1px;}

a {text-decoration:none;}

dt {font-weight:bold;}

ol {list-style-type:decimal;}
ol ol {list-style-type:lower-alpha;}
ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-roman;}
ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:decimal;}
ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-alpha;}
ol ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-roman;}
ol ol ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:decimal;}

.txtOptionInput {width:11em;}

#contentWrapper .chkOptionInput {border:0;}

.externalLink {text-decoration:underline;}

.indent {margin-left:3em;}
.outdent {margin-left:3em; text-indent:-3em;}
code.escaped {white-space:nowrap;}

.tiddlyLinkExisting {font-weight:bold;}
.tiddlyLinkNonExisting {font-style:italic;}

/* the 'a' is required for IE, otherwise it renders the whole tiddler in bold */
a.tiddlyLinkNonExisting.shadow {font-weight:bold;}

#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkExisting,
	#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkNonExisting,
	#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkNonExisting {font-weight:normal; font-style:normal;}
#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkExisting {font-weight:bold; font-style:normal;}

.header {position:relative;}
.header a:hover {background:transparent;}
.headerShadow {position:relative; padding:4.5em 0em 1em 1em; left:-1px; top:-1px;}
.headerForeground {position:absolute; padding:4.5em 0em 1em 1em; left:0px; top:0px;}

.siteTitle {font-size:3em;}
.siteSubtitle {font-size:1.2em;}

#mainMenu {position:absolute; left:0; width:10em; text-align:right; line-height:1.6em; padding:1.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em; font-size:1.1em;}

#sidebar {position:absolute; right:3px; width:16em; font-size:.9em;}
#sidebarOptions {padding-top:0.3em;}
#sidebarOptions a {margin:0em 0.2em; padding:0.2em 0.3em; display:block;}
#sidebarOptions input {margin:0.4em 0.5em;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {margin-left:1em; padding:0.5em; font-size:.85em;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {font-weight:bold; display:inline; padding:0;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel input {margin:0 0 .3em 0;}
#sidebarTabs .tabContents {width:15em; overflow:hidden;}

.wizard {padding:0.1em 1em 0em 2em;}
.wizard h1 {font-size:2em; font-weight:bold; background:none; padding:0em 0em 0em 0em; margin:0.4em 0em 0.2em 0em;}
.wizard h2 {font-size:1.2em; font-weight:bold; background:none; padding:0em 0em 0em 0em; margin:0.4em 0em 0.2em 0em;}
.wizardStep {padding:1em 1em 1em 1em;}
.wizard .button {margin:0.5em 0em 0em 0em; font-size:1.2em;}
.wizardFooter {padding:0.8em 0.4em 0.8em 0em;}
.wizardFooter .status {padding:0em 0.4em 0em 0.4em; margin-left:1em;}
.wizard .button {padding:0.1em 0.2em 0.1em 0.2em;}

#messageArea {position:fixed; top:2em; right:0em; margin:0.5em; padding:0.5em; z-index:2000; _position:absolute;}
.messageToolbar {display:block; text-align:right; padding:0.2em 0.2em 0.2em 0.2em;}
#messageArea a {text-decoration:underline;}

.tiddlerPopupButton {padding:0.2em 0.2em 0.2em 0.2em;}
.popupTiddler {position: absolute; z-index:300; padding:1em 1em 1em 1em; margin:0;}

.popup {position:absolute; z-index:300; font-size:.9em; padding:0; list-style:none; margin:0;}
.popup .popupMessage {padding:0.4em;}
.popup hr {display:block; height:1px; width:auto; padding:0; margin:0.2em 0em;}
.popup li.disabled {padding:0.4em;}
.popup li a {display:block; padding:0.4em; font-weight:normal; cursor:pointer;}
.listBreak {font-size:1px; line-height:1px;}
.listBreak div {margin:2px 0;}

.tabset {padding:1em 0em 0em 0.5em;}
.tab {margin:0em 0em 0em 0.25em; padding:2px;}
.tabContents {padding:0.5em;}
.tabContents ul, .tabContents ol {margin:0; padding:0;}
.txtMainTab .tabContents li {list-style:none;}
.tabContents li.listLink { margin-left:.75em;}

#contentWrapper {display:block;}
#splashScreen {display:none;}

#displayArea {margin:1em 17em 0em 14em;}

.toolbar {text-align:right; font-size:.9em;}

.tiddler {padding:1em 1em 0em 1em;}

.missing .viewer,.missing .title {font-style:italic;}

.title {font-size:1.6em; font-weight:bold;}

.missing .subtitle {display:none;}
.subtitle {font-size:1.1em;}

.tiddler .button {padding:0.2em 0.4em;}

.tagging {margin:0.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0; float:left; display:none;}
.isTag .tagging {display:block;}
.tagged {margin:0.5em; float:right;}
.tagging, .tagged {font-size:0.9em; padding:0.25em;}
.tagging ul, .tagged ul {list-style:none; margin:0.25em; padding:0;}
.tagClear {clear:both;}

.footer {font-size:.9em;}
.footer li {display:inline;}

.annotation {padding:0.5em; margin:0.5em;}

* html .viewer pre {width:99%; padding:0 0 1em 0;}
.viewer {line-height:1.4em; padding-top:0.5em;}
.viewer .button {margin:0em 0.25em; padding:0em 0.25em;}
.viewer blockquote {line-height:1.5em; padding-left:0.8em;margin-left:2.5em;}
.viewer ul, .viewer ol {margin-left:0.5em; padding-left:1.5em;}

.viewer table, table.twtable {border-collapse:collapse; margin:0.8em 1.0em;}
.viewer th, .viewer td, .viewer tr,.viewer caption,.twtable th, .twtable td, .twtable tr,.twtable caption {padding:3px;}
table.listView {font-size:0.85em; margin:0.8em 1.0em;}
table.listView th, table.listView td, table.listView tr {padding:0px 3px 0px 3px;}

.viewer pre {padding:0.5em; margin-left:0.5em; font-size:1.2em; line-height:1.4em; overflow:auto;}
.viewer code {font-size:1.2em; line-height:1.4em;}

.editor {font-size:1.1em;}
.editor input, .editor textarea {display:block; width:100%; font:inherit;}
.editorFooter {padding:0.25em 0em; font-size:.9em;}
.editorFooter .button {padding-top:0px; padding-bottom:0px;}

.fieldsetFix {border:0; padding:0; margin:1px 0px 1px 0px;}

.sparkline {line-height:1em;}
.sparktick {outline:0;}

.zoomer {font-size:1.1em; position:absolute; overflow:hidden;}
.zoomer div {padding:1em;}

* html #backstage {width:99%;}
* html #backstageArea {width:99%;}
#backstageArea {display:none; position:relative; overflow: hidden; z-index:150; padding:0.3em 0.5em 0.3em 0.5em;}
#backstageToolbar {position:relative;}
#backstageArea a {font-weight:bold; margin-left:0.5em; padding:0.3em 0.5em 0.3em 0.5em;}
#backstageButton {display:none; position:absolute; z-index:175; top:0em; right:0em;}
#backstageButton a {padding:0.1em 0.4em 0.1em 0.4em; margin:0.1em 0.1em 0.1em 0.1em;}
#backstage {position:relative; width:100%; z-index:50;}
#backstagePanel {display:none; z-index:100; position:absolute; margin:0em 3em 0em 3em; padding:1em 1em 1em 1em;}
.backstagePanelFooter {padding-top:0.2em; float:right;}
.backstagePanelFooter a {padding:0.2em 0.4em 0.2em 0.4em;}
#backstageCloak {display:none; z-index:20; position:absolute; width:100%; height:100px;}

.whenBackstage {display:none;}
.backstageVisible .whenBackstage {display:block;}
/*}}}*/
/***
StyleSheet for use when a translation requires any css style changes.
This StyleSheet can be used directly by languages such as Chinese, Japanese and Korean which use a logographic writing system and need larger font sizes.
***/

/*{{{*/
body {font-size:0.8em;}

#sidebarOptions {font-size:1.05em;}
#sidebarOptions a {font-style:normal;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {font-size:0.95em;}

.subtitle {font-size:0.8em;}

.viewer table.listView {font-size:0.95em;}

.htmlarea .toolbarHA table {border:1px solid ButtonFace; margin:0em 0em;}
/*}}}*/
/*{{{*/
@media print {
#mainMenu, #sidebar, #messageArea, .toolbar, #backstageButton {display: none ! important;}
#displayArea {margin: 1em 1em 0em 1em;}
/* Fixes a feature in Firefox 1.5.0.2 where print preview displays the noscript content */
noscript {display:none;}
}
/*}}}*/
<!--{{{-->
<div class='header' macro='gradient vert [[ColorPalette::PrimaryLight]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]'>
<div class='headerShadow'>
<span class='siteTitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteTitle'></span>&nbsp;
<span class='siteSubtitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteSubtitle'></span>
</div>
<div class='headerForeground'>
<span class='siteTitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteTitle'></span>&nbsp;
<span class='siteSubtitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteSubtitle'></span>
</div>
</div>
<div id='mainMenu' refresh='content' tiddler='MainMenu'></div>
<div id='sidebar'>
<div id='sidebarOptions' refresh='content' tiddler='SideBarOptions'></div>
<div id='sidebarTabs' refresh='content' force='true' tiddler='SideBarTabs'></div>
</div>
<div id='displayArea'>
<div id='messageArea'></div>
<div id='tiddlerDisplay'></div>
</div>
<!--}}}-->
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar closeTiddler closeOthers +editTiddler > fields syncing permalink references jump'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='subtitle'><span macro='view modifier link'></span>, <span macro='view modified date'></span> (<span macro='message views.wikified.createdPrompt'></span> <span macro='view created date'></span>)</div>
<div class='tagging' macro='tagging'></div>
<div class='tagged' macro='tags'></div>
<div class='viewer' macro='view text wikified'></div>
<div class='tagClear'></div>
<!--}}}-->
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar +saveTiddler -cancelTiddler deleteTiddler'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit title'></div>
<div macro='annotations'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit text'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit tags'></div><div class='editorFooter'><span macro='message views.editor.tagPrompt'></span><span macro='tagChooser'></span></div>
<!--}}}-->
To get started with this blank TiddlyWiki, you'll need to modify the following tiddlers:
* SiteTitle & SiteSubtitle: The title and subtitle of the site, as shown above (after saving, they will also appear in the browser title bar)
* MainMenu: The menu (usually on the left)
* DefaultTiddlers: Contains the names of the tiddlers that you want to appear when the TiddlyWiki is opened
You'll also need to enter your username for signing your edits: <<option txtUserName>>
These InterfaceOptions for customising TiddlyWiki are saved in your browser

Your username for signing your edits. Write it as a WikiWord (eg JoeBloggs)

<<option txtUserName>>
<<option chkSaveBackups>> SaveBackups
<<option chkAutoSave>> AutoSave
<<option chkRegExpSearch>> RegExpSearch
<<option chkCaseSensitiveSearch>> CaseSensitiveSearch
<<option chkAnimate>> EnableAnimations

----
Also see AdvancedOptions
Advisor: ''Stephen Aizenstat''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Stephen Aizenstat" '
>>
Advisor: ''Joseph Coppin''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Joseph Coppin" '
>>
Advisor: ''Lionel Corbett''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Lionel Corbett" '
>>
Advisor: ''Mike Denney''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Mike Denney" '
>>
Advisor: ''Christine Downing''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Christine Downing" '
>>
Advisor: ''Veronica Goodchild''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Veronica Goodchild" '
>>
Advisor: ''Stanislov Grof''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Stanislov Grof" '
>>
Advisor: ''Aaron Kipnis''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Aaron Kipnis" '
>>
Advisor: ''Helene Lorenz''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Helene Lorenz" '
>>
Advisor: ''Deborah ~MacWilliams''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Deborah MacWilliams" '
>>
Advisor: ''Valerie Mantecon''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Valerie Mantecon" '
>>
Advisor: ''Elizabeth Eowyn Nelson''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Elizabeth Eowyn Nelson" '
>>
Advisor: ''Robert Romanyshyn''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Robert Romanyshyn" '
>>
Advisor: ''Jennifer Leigh Selig''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Jennifer Leigh Selig" '
>>
Advisor: ''Glen Slater''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Glen Slater" '
>>
Advisor: ''Dennis Slattery''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Dennis Slattery" '
>>
Advisor: ''Dianne Skafte''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Dianne Skafte" '
>>
Advisor: ''Victoria Stevens''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Victoria Stevens" '
>>
Advisor: ''Mary Watkins''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Mary Watkins" '
>>
Advisor: ''Barry Williams''
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Barry Williams" '
>>
Freed (2003). //After Sex? A Study of Young Female Teens//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3113901|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765206571&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
Girls are having sex sooner now than in earlier generations (Currie, 1999). Some authors have started to ask girls about their sexual attitudes and experiences (Hass, 1979; Martin, 1996; Ponton, 2000). Because historically, so little attention has been paid to the sexual fantasy and sexual experience of early teens (Tolman, 2002), there is still very little emotional and cultural support an adolescent, parent, or society can turn to when a young female crosses that first sexual threshold.

The textual hermeneutic research method with a heuristic inquiry was applied to this topic in order to gather many-sided observations and attitudes about young teen girls and sexual initiations. The dialogue is an exchange between the ideas in mythology, anthropology, sociology, developmental psychology, depth psychology, my own experiences, and discussions with women and teens.

Looking further into the experiences of so many young women who have sex at an early age, I am not merely pursuing facts, but hope to conduct an inquiry into the meanings of such significant socially perceived violations. The young women who have crossed this socially discouraged line need to be understood in order to bring honor to their mistakes and their discoveries. My experience as a young female teen who engaged in sexual intercourse gives me a fertile passion and entry into my subject matter. Counseling women and teens for 25 years has sensitized my ears and eyes to the underworld of young female teen sexuality.

Listening to and learning from these girls' journeys of forbidden sexuality, one can begin to hear lost fragments in the development of a modern Western culture, to collect and reveal missing pieces from the initiating psyche, and tend the wounded nature of female adolescence and the corresponding wounds of uninitiated elders.

Working with and learning from teenagers and grown women who have had sexual intercourse before the age of 15 years sheds light on the mysteries of female sexuality, spiritual longing, psychological individuation, and the climate of North American cultural messages toward women.
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Silberstein, J. (2006). //An angel and her feather: How fact and fiction heal and explore the archetype of home//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3281470|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1417798411&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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The idea for this dissertation arose out of an image I beheld as a 6 ½ year old South African child who immigrated to America. The image was of two angels in the snow, lying flat and somber, praying for a savior to help them find their way back home. The snow angels became a metaphor in this dissertation for the profound feelings of loss one experiences when one abandons one's childhood home and enters a foreign land devoid of connection and soul. The angels also serve in this study as an ongoing archetype for the relinquishment of the divine, spiritual realm and the interminable surrendering to the mundane, earthly world. The study addresses the questions: How can poetic images move and sustain us on a depth psychological level, ultimately leading us back home? And, how does one take such poetic visions and link them with academic research? To approach these questions, I chose the artistic method in the form of a memoir, //Angels in the Snow// , and novel, //The Gossamer Thread//, illustrating how both fact and fiction writing can assist in a deep sense of healing and in an exploration of the archetype of home. Both pieces ponder the depth psychological paradox between the conscious and unconscious, between the mundane realm and the imaginal realm, between the human and changeable and the immortal and permanent, and between life and art. Connecting scholastic research with a poetic sensibility required the tools or set of attitudinal skills defined by phenomenological hermeneutics and heuristic inquiry. By emphasizing the philosophy of both of these qualitative methodologies, I was able to link the snow angels within an academic research framework, honoring the lived experience while leaving room for the soul's deepest language, the primordial image.
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Ancestral echoes and modern voices: The family story of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings

Shine Duck, A. W. (2001). //Ancestral echoes and modern voices: The family story of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2001). (Publication No. [[AAT 3029755|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726045211&sid=3&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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For over 200 years, Jefferson's black and white relatives and their descendants lived separate existences. The interweavings of the larger family were consciously and unconsciously suppressed within and between each side of the family. This silence and separation contained many wounds. This dissertation explored the soul wounding that has occurred.

A phenomenological and heuristic research design was utilized to explore the experience of racial separation among the descendants of Jefferson. What wounds, mythologies, and images still influence their lives? What silences were used to deny that relationship? How can descendants facilitate the recovery from such wounds and create healthy relationships? What insights can depth psychology contribute to the understanding and healing of this woundedness?

These questions were addressed by exploring the lived experiences of a sample of 14 self-identified Jefferson's descendants. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with descendants from both the Martha Jefferson and the Sally Hernings, family lines. This researcher's own experience further complemented that understanding.

The interview process consisted of two separate dialogues. Both utilized a semi-structured format to allow for the mutual exchange of family history and information. Participants were encouraged to ask any questions they had of this researcher.

The participants' experiences portrayed a family legacy of silence, denial, disconnection, and fear that continues to the present day. Images of a void, a lost family, and the forgotten ancestors emerged from the histories of silence. A family paradigm of exclusion acted as an unhealed wound that continues to create barriers between individuals. Many believed that candid dialogue among family members was essential to nurture a new paradigm of inclusion and to facilitate healing. Additionally, a public voice and rituals of remembrance could facilitate the healing of those wounds that separate and alienate this family.

The Jefferson family's story also reflects the legacy of racism in America. The family is engaged in personal and collective struggles regarding their history of slavery, their self-acknowledgement to one another, and their respective systems of power. All these issues too remain embedded in the psyche of our country.
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Beloff, M. R. (2001). //Archetypal Jewish divorce ritual (the Get): Witnessing the voices//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2001). (Publication No. AAT [[3043117|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726336621&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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 This qualitative study examined the experiences of seven individuals who were participants of the ancient Jewish ritual of divorce (the Get). The study explored the phenomenological experiences of the participants, both what was hurtful, and helpful and healing, to each person in making the transition from married to single life. The literature review focused on the following five areas: the Jewish divorce ritual (the Get); the psychological effects of separation and divorce on adults and children; separation, divorce, and the magic of transformation through suffering; rituals and rites of passage; and the depth psychological perspectives on divorce. Organic research methodology, based on a foundation of phenomenological, heuristic, and feminist research methodologies, was the method of choice because of its unique goals of on-going individual transformation of all the participants of the study (researcher, participants, and readers of the work), and its ability to maintain its reverence for the sacred in the work. Other goals of organic research methodology which were important to this study included grounding the study in the researcher's own story, allowing for the method to evolve creatively as the unconscious process and circumstances of the work unfold, and being fully present when dialoguing with the research participants. The participants' stories were presented individually, in the form of portraits. Following each portrait, the golden threads of wisdom emerging from each participant's story were presented. A brief section relating to how each participant and researcher was affected by participation in the study was also included. Factors common to the healing of all of the participants of the study were outlined. Factors that were found to be most significant and potentially helpful to those within the secular world who are seeking to develop new and creative rituals of divorce were also identified. The tremendous power of archetypal ritual rites of passage to contain and move individuals through the suffering and pain of divorce was demonstrated by the experiences of the participants of this study.
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La Salle, T. J. (2007) //Awakening to ecocide//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2007). (Publication No. [[AAT 3281474|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1404353831&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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Human beings have systematically and rapidly engaged in the destruction of the natural world. Since long before modern times, the conscious or unconscious degradation of the environment, with its attendant pollution, atmospheric warming, soil loss, and elimination of species, has been accelerating, and is now climaxing at the most rapid pace ever recorded or studied. Humans are the primary disrupter of the natural balance and we remain as the principal disturbance to the self healing quality of the natural world. People, for the most part, are acting as if this destruction, also known as "ecocide," it is not occurring. Social, economic and political structures both domestically and on the transnational level continue to support the status quo of humanity's destructive patterns.

This study uses a depth psychological lens to examine possible root causes of ecocide. It provides a reflective space for discussing the propensity to ecocide in the human psyche, then investigates what distinguishes those who are awake and working to change our current destructive paradigm from those who are asleep and ignoring it.

The data source for the study is interviews with eight ecological leaders/activists who have brought the reality of ecocide to consciousness and are working for change. The research methodology used participatory hermeneutics along with a strong heuristic exploration that involve the author's internal personal search including self-dialogue, meditation, introspection, and self-discovery.

The study identified three important elements that are essential for the well-being of both the human psyche and the ecologically based soul of the world. The elements are (1) The critical need for the human psyche to have an ego strength with the ability to suffer marginalization, which is developed through the process of individuation as defined by C.G. Jung; (2) the need for an initiation into the dream of the end of the world with the ability to suffer the apocalyptic nature of our present life condition on the planet and act anyway; and (3) the need for a "re-membering," which the author defines as a return to the sacred and reverential worldview in which our story and myth becomes once again immersed into the fabric of creation.
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Watson, R. T. (2002). Bad seed, bad blood: Queer transgression, death, and rebirth. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3067642| http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=764991451&sid=4&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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This research explores the experience of individuation for the self-identified gay men interviewed for this study. The study explores the dialectic between who they experience themselves to be versus the stereotypical projection by the patriarchal heteronormative culture in which they are immersed. The stories of each of these men encapsulate a uniquely individual journey from the suffering of dissociated isolation to the compassionate relatedness of connected knowing, a conscious participation and connectedness with a greater archetypal unity than that of their personal self or ego. Rather than a static conclusion or singular place of arrival, these journeys end in the recognition of an ongoing process of becoming. This process required them to develop the ability to tolerate disruption and mess, confusion and disorder in their internal experience as well as their interactions with the world in which they are immersed. It became imperative for them to develop not only the capacity for reflection on their internal intrapsychic processes and the effects that the interactions of their particular archetypal elements and complexes manifest, but also maintain empathy for themselves as they struggle through the resulting chaos. They have had to develop the capacity to hold on to optimism, in the face of withering negativity and opposition, as well as keep up a determined commitment to the ever evolving project of being able to imagine what-could-be-possible in order to discover the path appropriate for them as individuals given the combination of their particular archetypal endowment and personal experiences.
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Weitzel, T. (2006). Becoming alive: Individual and collective recovery in a multicultural church. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. AAT [[3211958| http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1127209191&sid=5&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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''Abstract''

This study examined the sources of aliveness at Glide United Methodist Church in San Francisco, California. Glide has a reputation for being extraordinarily alive and vibrant as well as being a source of healing for a strikingly diverse range of people.

The methodology followed a participatory hermeneutic approach in which Glide leadership, staff, congregants, clients, and I collaborated in a search to identify and articulate the sources of Glide's aliveness. Through multiple and spiracle conversations with each of 17 co-researchers, my own participatory observations, and a reading of literature related to Glide, a story of aliveness emerged and at its source was Glide's emphasis on recovery. The spirit and work of recovery that permeates every corner of Glide is about regaining our individual and collective wholeness, which we have lost living in a hierarchical and oppressive system that marginalizes far too many people and ways of being. Through the practices and rituals of recovery, Glide members liberate their authentic selves in community with others.

The larger story of recovery was presented through the life/recovery stories of co-researchers. Then this story served as the text upon which a depth psychological hermeneutic was conducted using the lenses of Jungian, post-Jungian, post-Freudian, and liberation psychologies. The goal of this hermeneutic was to articulate new insights and additional dimensions of understanding regarding the aliveness at Glide brought about through its emphasis on recovering our individual and collective wholeness.

Because this study limited its examination of aliveness to one historically located Christian church, its findings may not be easily generalizable to other churches and organizations. The study does, however, suggest the radically transformative role religious organizations dedicated to individual and collective healing can potentially play in American culture today. It deepens our understanding of the healing role a loving social space&mdash;-with rituals and practices aimed at wholeness&mdash;can have on thousands of lives. It illustrates a structure for religious community that appeals to many who have been alienated by organized religion. And because of these things, it may also inspire other religious organizations to embrace their potential as a vessel for recovery.
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Killinger, J. (2006). //Between the Frying Pan and the Fire: The Intermundia of Clergy Transitioning Out of Parish Ministry//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3247249|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1253509631&sid=6&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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In "Between the Frying Pan and the Fire," we engage in an examination of vocational Orphanhood, a call to being an orphan, specifically of clergy who have made or are making a transition out of parish ministry into mainstream life. Definitions of vocation are themselves often distinguished by an affinity with the divine. Being between worlds, intermundia is demonstrated to be synonymous with notions of abyss and Void. Seen in this light, the dynamic images of intermundia, abyss, and Void are understood as that from which potentials might emanate and to which they might return.

Our dissertation work, this piece on clergy in intermundia, is itself abyss, Void, intermundia, orphan, vagrant, foreigner/stranger, and alien, deconstructed in its own collapse, its own folding and unfolding. Utilizing a praxis of anamnesis, unforgetting, we deconstruct the deconstruction by approaching this piece Orphically. Through anamnesis, this deconstructive text of re-gard, which in effect is what we both are and do when we realize we are intermundia, re-calls for us the fact that we have forgotten we are ourselves Orphan: outlaw, pervert (thoroughly, entirely, to destruction turned around or turned the wrong way), vagrant, adventurer, hooligan, intermundianaut.

This study researches phenomenologically seven members of the clergy who have made or are making the transition out of their respective calls to parish ministry to engage the world as part of the mainstream and find themselves between worlds, intermundia. From these seven portraits, this study moves into re-search through reflection upon their engagement with the numinous through a series of transference dialogues, extending beneath both the complexity of our knowledge and the knowledge of our complexity enfolded by fantasy and reverie. It is an attempt to process the material through an imaginal approach using an alchemical hermeneutic methodology.

Finally, an epilogue offers for consideration proposals for an interventionless approach to the intermundia of clergy transitioning out of parish ministry. It is hoped that through this study some transformation may occur. Through our engagement with this material, we may experience an anamnestic shift occurring within our own psyches as the voice of the vocational Orphan makes itself heard within these pages.
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Hunter, E. (2006). //Beyond the shadows of cohousing: Cultivating idealism, identity, borders and trust//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3247247|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1253490951&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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One of the fundamental dynamics of human existence is the tension between our need for individuality and our need for community, our need to be apart from others while at the same time having a need to be a part of others. How we navigate the borders between ourselves and others, how rigidly or how flexibly we hold these borders, and where we draw the line between us and them has great significance. Community, a paradoxical and sometimes vague term, is often used to lament what is felt to be missing in our fragmented, postmodern, suburban neighborhoods of America. Cohousing, a type of intentional community that originated in Denmark in the early 1970s, is designed to create and sustain a sense of community. Cohousing's five basic architectural and organizational tenets, which run counter to the traditional American housing values of privacy and ownership, seek to incorporate choice and change, the basic defining values of intentional communities. This study explores the question "what is the cultural and psychological effect of a cohousing community on its surrounding neighborhood?" The research is derived from interviews with members of a cohousing community located in a typical American suburb, along with neighbors of the community, and members of two other intentional communities that have significantly different organizational structures. The study revealed shadow aspects of idealism, identity, borders, and trust throughout the cohousing community and the surrounding neighborhood. Elements inherent in the design of cohousing deeply divide members of the cohousing community from each other, as well as from their surrounding neighbors. Although cohousing holds the possibility of providing an experience of community, it is critical to recognize that the essence of community is attitude, not address. To create generative communities there must be involvement, reciprocity, and engagement with the world beyond the borders of the community. Individuals who currently live in cohousing communities and professionals who help create them must address directly the shadow aspects that hinder the full potential of cohousing. Depth psychological personal work is an integral element to develop the individuated capacity for inner connection that is necessary to create community.
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Wielenga, L. M.(2002). Black teenage pregnancy and the divine child: A depth psychological approach to a cultural problem. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3081679| http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765316281&sid=6&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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Underprivileged, Black teenaged girls face the dilemma of becoming pregnant, which transports them from their world of growth into responsibilities of adulthood for which they are unprepared. All too often, these dilemmas result in nearly unbearable suffering and a lifetime of dependency and failure to be integrated into society. Worse yet, the social conditions which result from Black teenage pregnancy tend to perpetuate this problem for the offspring and for further generations.

When addressing this problem, I decided to use an artistic methodology, which allowed me the freedom to incorporate heuristic and hermeneutic research while offering personal life stories in the form of memoirs. Initially, heuristic research was the path I had planned to take. But as the process began to work me, I considered hermeneutic research. Once I began to see myself as a part of this work, using an artistic methodology was what I knew I was supposed to do. The artistic method gave me the freedom to tell my story in the memoirs that are a part of this dissertation.

Having come in contact with so many Black teens who are considered "at risk," living in group homes, or pregnant, I was able to accept my past for what it was and accept myself for who I used to be. I allowed myself to go through my life using stories and the imaginal, going deep inside and realizing my connection with the girls I have come to know; learning our likenesses and feeling my pain, which is their pain as well. I have needed love from a mother and father that I have never received. These pregnant teens are looking for that identical love. But we all fail to realize that the love we seek is not in our parents, the fathers of our children, or our babies. It lives in the center of our souls. The love we need is the love we've always had.
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~Ghammachi-Bennett, M. (2001). //Blood psyche: Body, ancestry, and soul//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2001). (Publication No. AAT [[3035185|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726124341&sid=3&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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This dissertation investigates the passage of one archetypal symbol&mdash;blood&mdash;through the personal and the collective psyche of the individual and the world. In the context of depth psychology, the soul of an individual lacks corporeality; psyche resides in the mind severed from body. It is my contention that psyche or soul is an active corporeal agent that circulates in the blood, streaming through the body and the entire mental apparatus&mdash;the consciousness as well as the unconscious&mdash;of all beings. From this perspective beings consist of a body and mind that is ensouled.

Blood Psychology is a theoretical study which focuses on blood as a powerful archetypal symbol and tracks its flow through the depth psychological landscape&mdash;a terrain that consists of eroticism, ecology, ancient mystery rites and ritual, literary motifs, alchemical symbolism, and the transferential dimension.

Thorough studies in these areas suggest that blood correlates with the developmental movement of psyche on the path of individuation. By following the course of blood through history and culture, as archetypal symbol and image active in psyche and world, fascinating information is revealed. A new perspective emerges that applies to the revival of ancient wisdom rooted in the body's biology. The union of biology with depth psychology connects us to a deeper understanding of one collective body, ancestry, and soul.
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Denney (2001). Body, soul, and medicine: Confessions of an elder physician. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2001). (Publication No. AAT [[3029756|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726041441&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The modern medical healing arts are caught in the prevailing scientific paradigm of Western culture, functioning with a biomedical science that privileges quantity over quality, fragmentation over wholeness, and matter over spirit. As a result, the emotional, spiritual, and soulful aspects of healing are often neglected. Addressing this schism, medical schools have included the humanities in education, pastoral workers have become active in hospitals, and psychologists tend to patients undergoing somatic care. Meanwhile, individuals have turned to various forms of alternative or complementary medicine, seeking to incorporate life meaning and spirituality within their illnesses and treatments. Although some individual practicing physicians and other healers have tried to include these alternative methods in standard medical practice, most of the members of the medical profession have kept these soulful practices clearly separate from "scientific" medical care. Motivated by regrets of my own dissociation of science and spirituality during my years of medical education, training, and practice, I have asked how I might inspire myself and others to build a bridge to connect science and spirituality in the medical healing arts. To approach this question, I chose the artistic method in the form of a series of essays. After constructing a thorough theoretical thematic hermeneutic argument outlining the problem, I chose to express the findings through a series of four confessional essays which tell their stories from the heart as well as the mind. With stories of personal experiences in modern medical care, the essays speak through the voice of both elder physician and fledgling depth psychologist and view modern medicine through the lenses of 20th-century depth psychology and its close relationship with complexity science, and quantum theory. In doing so, the essays begin to construct a bridge over which to bring an outdated biomedical science up-to-date. These essays are the first few stones in the construction of that bridge.
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Keiller, B. B. (2002). //'Border' psyche invites re-visioning: A depth psychological exploration of three contemporary borders-intimate erotic relationships, Sunset Cliffs Natural Park, and the San Diego/Tijuana border (California, Mexico)// (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). UMI No. [[3084885|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765369821&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]].
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This dissertation explores three contemporary borders and takes depth psychology out of the clinical setting and into the multidimensional context of “body,” of habitat, and of a sense of place. The work of soul calls us to witness, to explore, and to discover fellow participants in the landscape where events reflect the larger story.

The research employs tools inherited from depth psychology, the paradigm offered by Process Thought, and understandings from ecology. These tools and understandings offer a perspective for the process of exploring particular border landscapes as a participant. Re-visioning border psyche requires deep listening, unveiling, and mining subterranean levels of the dynamic web of border psyche.

Both conscious and unconscious assumptions are explored and unveiled. Images, stories, and events became increasingly animated during the researcher's participation in the particular border landscapes. The research followed cues from the heuristic method, grounded theory, and hermeneutics in its exploration of the three contemporary landscapes.

The soul work of re-visioning border psyche called for archetypal activism as described by Hillman (1997) and Aizenstat (1995). The researcher weaves in actual experiences and research as a participant in the three contemporary landscapes. Dream work, interviews, experiences, and theoretical research are integral aspects of the dissertation.

An example of what became visible during the research was the illusion and desire for control. The image of flow as well as the natural energy of flow was discovered early in the research as a contrast to actual and psychological walls created by human beings participating in the three border landscapes.

It appears that human beings respond to the “other,” such as at the Tijuana/San Diego Border and at the edge of a cliff where the sea meets the cliffs with responses that reflect styles of relating in intimate erotic relationships and intimate erotic relationships challenge couples to intentionally create relationships that are dynamic and that reflect each unique differentiating style and voice.

Two theories emerged during the research—the embodying process and embodied borders. The two theories offer possibilities for perceiving animated and enchanted aspects of particular border, landscapes. Erotic nature is embraced and soul is experienced.

Three illustrations of embodied borders are described in the final chapter. Dynamic life energy cried out for recognition and honor as fellow participants appeared. A way of perceiving beyond dualisms, beyond humano-centrism, and beyond a Euro centric perspective became evident. Embodied borders are profoundly relational, dynamic, and filled with interacting participants. Multiplicities and mysteries abound. 
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Harthcock, M. (2005). //Caring as a subversive activity: A study in liberation pedagogy//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2005). (Publication No. AAT [[3166381|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=885699241&sid=5&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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Depth psychologists talk a lot about love, but very little about its mundane sister-practice of caring. Our silence mirrors the silence in the culture, where our unwillingness to care for each other and our earthly home has reached a state of crisis. Psychologist Carol Gilligan noticed the deadly impact of this silence on personal relationships. In our culture, she wrote, we are "in love with a tragic love story."

I have extended the reach of Gilligan's complaint from the personal to the cultural/global in order to argue that we are also in love with a tragic story of caring. My question involves how to bring this tragedy to consciousness and creative response, especially given the counterintuitive tendency for discussions on caring to spark into anger and spiral out of control. The issue is not only cloaked, it is cloaked and fiercely defended. People have literally trembled in fury over my attempts to explore the contradictions inherent in the roles of wife and mother.

As a consequence, I had to find a methodology that would allow me to explore the nebulous coming-to-consciousness that must happen before creative responses are possible. The methodology I chose is called critical or emancipatory action research, and its most striking characteristic is a focus on the learning that may emerge through multiple and cyclical applications of action-reflection-action-reflection. I pursued this cyclical process with "invitational" narratives. Three separate times, I wrote an account of what I thought might be happening in our group and gave it to members for reflection and feedback.

Eventually, our dialogue and reflection revealed a particularly poignant paradox: Even caregivers, it seems, host a covert but decidedly individualistic philosophy that sabotages our efforts to care and promote caring. Although it is possible to awaken a sense of this paradox, ultimately this study warns that it does not awaken gently. When it happened for us, the view of Soul was searing. We were neither soothed nor comforted nor inspired to collaborative action. And yet, perhaps, we were changed.
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Jones, P. F. (2004). City and Psyche: An Exploration into the Archetype of City. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. AAT [[3119796|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765336621&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The city has always been many things to many people. As a phenomenon and archetype of collective human experience, the city is universal across all times and cultures. This study imagines the city as a psychological as well as a physical or cultural phenomenon. A desire to step outside the pragmatic and analytical thinking that dominates most contemporary work on cities and the built environment leads to the imaginal psychology of Jung and Hillman. Imagination becomes a way into the work, and a hermeneutic style of inquiry provides a means of working the texts of written material, myth, film, and literature with the stuff of lived experience.

Varied themes and phenomena are explored to gain a deeper and more imaginative appreciation of the modern city and its multiple meanings. These include memory and forgetting, losses and memorials, and the quaternity of earth, air, fire, and water. These are explored in the context of cities and contemporary urban life. Troublesome urban symptoms are worked as images and metaphors. These symptoms include sprawl, environmental degradation, traffic congestion, polluted air and water, rampant growth and expansion, the pervasive impacts of technology, and the stifling plethora of regulations and bureaucracy that now plague so much of contemporary urban life. An archetypal psychology framework begins to reveal the presence of what might be imagined as gods and goddesses we have banished from the modern city. The dissertation closes with an inquiry into the presence (or absence) of beauty, and its importance to soul in the city.

Unlike most studies on architecture and city planning, this study attempts to leave space for the personal and subjective in exploring multiple ways of understanding the city. I strive here to invite voices heard rarely in architecture and city planning: the more liquid voices of feeling, sensuality, and depth of lived experience&mdash;all of which invoke the shadowed presence of soul. That voice, wholly Other to contemporary narratives on the city, invites imaginal presences into the work. A second voice begins to speak through what would otherwise be solely a pragmatic or academic work. This is an attempted move toward integration and wholeness, at least partially dissolving the modern split between outer city and inner psyche.
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Meyer, R. (2005). //Clio's Circle: Historians Who Dare to Embrace the Unconscious//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2005). (Publication No. [[AAT 3238862|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1251811991&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The purpose of this dissertation is to delve into the roots of the historian's imagination. There is abundant evidence that many students hate history, considering it an irrelevant and boring subject with no connection to life. Working as a high-school history teacher for 20 years, I have been perplexed by the disconnect between the exciting creative process of writing history and the tedium of the experience of learning history for most high-school students. When educational theorists translate the process of creating history into the classroom they neglect the unconscious sources of inspiration which drive the call to write history. Fear causes many historians and educators alike to stay away from dreams, trance states, and visions.

The problem is examined through a thematic, hermeneutic analysis of scholarly and literary texts during the creative phase of historical research. First the archetypal figures behind the creation of history are examined. These include Clio, muse of history in ancient Greece, and the griots or oral historians of ancient Africa. Next the experiences with historical imagination of depth psychologists such as Sigmund Freud and C.G. Jung are used as a starting place for examining the memoirs of historians such as Arnold Toynbee, Richard Cobb, Simon Schama, Susan Griffin, and Aurora Morales. These are historians who dare to embrace the unconscious in their writing. The major idea developed is that dreams, trance states, and visions are an important but often unacknowledged part of the creative process for an historian. They often contain the seed which will germinate into a lifetime of historical research and writing.

The final part of this dissertation carries the research forward into the history classroom. Building on my experiences with the nonprofit organization, Facing History and Ourselves, practical examples of history lessons are given. Their aim is to cultivate historical imagination, bringing history alive for students and creating an antidote to the boredom of textbook history.
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Meek, E. A. (2005). //Creative flooding//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2005). (Publication No. AAT [[3211954|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1127197451&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=6993&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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Creativity, the ability to bring something new into existence, has allowed humankind to attain its highest achievements. Looking into the lives of those honored as highly creative, however, we often find individuals who are also considered to be disturbed, and studies abound indicating a disproportionately high concurrence of creativity and psychopathology. Must we accept that there is something intrinsic to the creative process that links it to mental illness? Or might there be other relevant considerations, possibly overlooked until now, that could help us understand the high incidence of psychopathology among creative individuals?

Employing a thematic, hermeneutic method that contains also a heuristic component, this theoretical dissertation proposes to bring to light a phenomenon that our culture has overlooked until now, creative flooding . Consider the following chart:

| Creatively Blocked | &nbsp;&nbsp;Manageable Flow of Creativity&nbsp;&nbsp;  | Creative Flooding |
| Less flow&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&larr;| &ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash; I &ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash;&ndash; | &rarr; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;More flow |

The individual at left is creatively blocked . There is no creative flow. At center is a person experiencing a manageable flow of creativity . Finally, consider a person experiencing creative flooding , where the increase in creative flow becomes overwhelming, no longer manageable.

It is important to emphasize that creative flooding is not caused by disturbing or emotionally upsetting ideas. All of the creativity is positive and useful. At issue is the overwhelming too muchness of what this person must deal with. Unfortunately, within our culture, although extensive attention is given to increasing creativity, complaining about having "too much creativity" is considered inappropriate, in bad taste. Unrecognized and without assistance, the creatively flooded are eventually overwhelmed.

This dissertation employs depth psychological principles to understand the creative process and the experience of creative flooding using the experiences of several artists as its data. Rather than perpetuating the practice of Western science, which merely pathologizes symptoms and then attempts to medicate them away, this work proposes that creative flooding can be understood as a subset of experiences which Grof (1990) calls spiritual emergencies .

As it explores new insights and strategies for supporting this previously overlooked population, our culture and those who are creatively flooded will both be offered an opportunity to enjoy the fruits of full creative lives.
<<<
Selig, J. L. (2004). //Cultural Therapy: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Work With the Soul of America//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. AAT [[3128814|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765942181&sid=6&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
Jesse Jackson once said of Martin Luther King, Jr., "Thinking about him is like thinking about the prism....You know there is another set of rays, and as many angles as you think about Dr. King, there is yet another set of angles with which to analyze him." Though King has been analyzed in detail from the angle of his leadership abilities, his social and historical legacy, his philosophical beliefs, his rhetorical and oratorical skills, and his theology, he has never before been analyzed in detail from the angle of depth psychology. The purpose of this dissertation is twofold: to see King in the light of depth psychology's rays, and to see depth psychology in the light of King's rays. Stated another way, depth psychology has much to offer to an understanding of King, but an understanding of King has just as much to offer to depth psychology.

This study offers some answers and interpretations to the following questions: how aware was King of psychology and its principles? Which of those principles did he use to effect cultural transformation? What are the parallels between King's work with the nation, and a therapist's work with a client? In what ways did he embody a therapeutic attitude and ethos? How was King like Jung's "great personality": someone who "acts upon society to liberate, to redeem, to transform, and to heal?" What myths did King enact, what projections did he carry, and how did those myths and projections affect him? Finally, what insights can depth psychology glean from analyzing King, particularly as they relate to the alchemical process of cultural transformation and healing?

The method for such a study is interpretative inquiry, defined by Martin J. Packer as an approach which opens up a perspective and articulates an accounting of a phenomenon. Packer states that the goal to which interpretive inquiry is ultimately directed is not just one of "mirroring reality in a descriptive account, but of changing it for the better in some way." Thus, I make plain my hope that through this work, my readers will better understand the psychological nature of cultural transformation and healing and will incorporate that deeper understanding into their own interpretations and actions, with the ultimate hope of changing the world (and depth psychology) for the better.
<<<
Rodriguez, C. S. (2001). //Dancing in the thresholds: Exploring the interactive field//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2001). (Publication No. AAT [[3025063|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=725975021&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This dissertation is an attempt to investigate the nature of the interactive field to deepen as well as broaden its scope as it applies to depth psychology and its praxis. With a phenomenological eye toward field dynamics from other paradigms, this exploration demonstrates an additional theoretical framework within the interactive field. It opens other possibilities creating a neither/nor position from which to contain our work with an alchemical/metaphorical position and allows for the liberation of the imaginal realm through which "the Other" may be of service, and in fact, may ask us to be in service to it.

The literature review not only surveys the three primary schools in psychology&mdash;the psychoanalytical, the classical, and archetypal as the genesis of the interactive field, but also investigates shamanic realms as a backdrop from which to see field theory. Field theory is also explored in the world of quantum physics where the universal field is examined from paradigms situated in varied consciousness models. The somatic unconscious, an intrinsic part of the interactive field in mutual engagement with two or more persons, is also woven into the fabric of this study as an intersection between the universal field and the psychodynamic field. This study, as a psychological gnosis, initiates subtle body awareness from Eastern cosmologies from a depth perspective in the psychodynamics of the interactive field. Synchronistic encounters are integrated into field theory as a threshold where universal fields engage the somatic unconscious, initiating numinous and sometimes transformative change into one's life.
<<<
Still, S. L. (2002). Dark Persephone: Soul's Descent to Eros. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3029756|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1031062721&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
For 5 years, I taught creative writing in a California state men's prison. This was a searing personal journey and an eye-opening look into correctional dynamics, the psyche of the criminal, and the social and cultural factors underlying criminality, leading to a reimagining of the penal institution.

This phenomenological and hermeneutical account honors image, poetry, memoir, and dream as modes for gaining insights into the personal and cultural dilemma that is prison, and explores the texts of the history of that investigation. Through the archetypal lens of the myth of Persephone, the prison is viewed as underworld/Hades/Hell, as seen by the men imprisoned there. Beyond the reach of most constructive influences, and thoroughly marginalized, like ghosts and shades, they are a population of invisibles&mdash;and thus, their association with Hades, the invisible god of the underworld.

Bringing to light deeply buried, often scarifying, life experiences through creative writing, we began to witness an unimaginable reality: within an institution built on the punitive premise of separation, isolation, and hatred, we were present at the epiphany of Eros.

An account of how this came to be, of the archetypal energies involved, and of implications for the correctional system makes up half the body of this work. A parallel inquiry into the nature of the Persephonic, or medial, woman&mdash;how her character is formed, how she accesses information through intuition and dream, her propensity for descent&mdash;supplies the other half.

Within the closed and pressurized alchemical vas hermeticum of the prison, we encountered energies similar to those of the ancient Mystery schools of Greece, or in traditional shamanic cultures, and witnessed a profound paradox: in underground dimness, light began to manifest. We had discovered those conditions under which love might alight upon us and remain within us, even in the heart of darkness.
<<<
Bostock, C. (2004). //Debio Tibi Nihil: Priapus, Homosexuality, and Archetypal Psychology//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004).(Publication No. [[AAT 3247243|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1253484761&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]] ).
<<<
The primary purpose of this dissertation, whose Latin title is a prayer to Priapus meaning "I owe you nothing," is to initiate a missing discourse within archetypal psychology: the subject of sexual identity. In this theoretical work, I attempt both to analyze this lacuna and demonstrate&mdash;through exegesis of the macrophallic image embodied by the god Priapus, the novel Satyricon and the film Hedwig and the Angry Inch&mdash;how archetypal psychology can be brought more into dialogue with poststructural discourses relevant to sexuality, including queer theory, for the sake of mutual enrichment.

Fundamental to this effort are two subsidiary purposes. First, by discussing the construction of queer sexual identity, I demonstrate that studying the actual historical contexts of myths may reveal to us material occluded by a strictly psychological or mythopoetic analysis. In this case, I demonstrate that the modern definition of homosexuality is a conflation of categories whose repression, imaged in the macrophallus, returns to disrupt the dominant culture's effort to pathologize sexuality other than heteronormative types.

Thus, my second subsidiary purpose is a more general demonstration of the way treating images purely as metaphors disembodies them&mdash;from the literal personal flesh and from the "flesh" of historical context. The latter in turn actually helps perpetuate and internalize the institutions of the dominant culture&mdash;in this particular case, patriarchy and homophobia&mdash;and tends to render archetypal psychology (or any other similarly self-limiting discourse) archaic in this context, even though one of its agendas is to move psychology out of the consulting room into the polis.

The dissertation concludes with a recommended postmodern aesthetic method of imaginal psychology that values metaphor, image, and myth but does not ignore their historical contexts, in either cultural or personal terms. Employing Hillman's discourse on the fiction of case history, I demonstrate, in the Appendix, an aesthetic therapeutic method which also serves the purpose of completing the hermeneutic circle by disclosing my own projected Priapus complex in undertaking this study.
<<<
[[by Author]]
~MacFarland, E. B. (2004). //Discovering the healing power of Nature: A new perspective for healing the wounds of childhood abuse//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. [[AAT 3137283|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=766270611&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
For the last twenty years many professionals in the mental health field have concentrated on the realities and psychological damage of child abuse. The study of trauma and its effects on the psyche, more specifically on children's developmental process, emerged. The analytic understanding of trauma has tended to dismiss the relevance and, to a degree, the importance of actual memory but rather delves more deeply into the nature of the unconscious (both personal and collective) as an individuation process that leads to healing and wholeness. A Hermeneutic method of research weaves the concept of the healing of trauma and its impact on children with the acceptance of past events and acknowledgement of the symbolic offerings of Nature. It offers understanding of how an alchemical relational vessel promotes the above healing to advance to a soulful connection with the universe. A heuristic style is employed at times as an illustration of how the hypothesis can be explored. Stories from film, literature, mythology, and case examples provide the basis of understanding for the concept. The problem of how some children are able to survive horrific childhoods and live fruitful and enriching lives is the focus of the study. Through working with three symbols&mdash;the horse, the dolphin, and the tree, the dissertation explores how Nature offers nurture and protection to children and adults in treatment. The questions that are addressed pertain to gaining an understanding of how Nature (the Great Mother) assists in the healing of traumatic wounds. Both schools of thought, abuse-focused therapy and the analytic approach, offer important insights and theories. It is suggested that symbolic reality and the world of the imaginal creates a field of dialogue and alchemical relationship that supports and encourages trust and an awareness of the numinous. An incidental finding that emerged indicates how symbols not only heal but call those who have been healed to a greater consciousness of the struggle of the collective.
<<<
Advisor: +++^[Stephen Aizenstat]
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Stephen Aizenstat" '
>>
=== +++^[Joseph Coppin]
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Joseph Coppin" '
>>
=== +++^[Lionel Corbett]
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Lionel Corbett" '
>>
=== +++^[Veronica Goodchild]
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Veronica Goodchild" '
>>
=== +++^[Helene Lorenz]
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Helene Lorenz" '
>>
===  

+++^[Robert Romanyshyn]
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Robert Romanyshyn" '
>>
=== +++^[Mary Watkins]
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 ' store.getValue(tiddler,"Advisor") == "Mary Watkins" '
>>
===
<<forEachTiddler
 where
 'tiddler.tags && tiddler.tags.length'
 sortBy 
 'getSortedTagsText(tiddler)+"###"+tiddler.title'
 script
 'function getSortedTagsText(tiddler) {var tags = tiddler.tags; if (!tags) return ""; tags.sort(); var result = ""; for (var i = 0; i < tags.length;i++) {result += tags[i]+ " ";} return result;} function getGroupTitle(tiddler, context) {if (!context.lastGroup || context.lastGroup != getSortedTagsText(tiddler)) { context.lastGroup = getSortedTagsText(tiddler); return "* {{{"+(context.lastGroup?context.lastGroup:"no tags")+"}}}\n";} else return "";} '
 write
 'getGroupTitle(tiddler, context)+"** [[" + tiddler.title+"]]\n"'
>>
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar +saveTiddler -cancelTiddler deleteTiddler'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit title'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit text'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit tags'></div><div class='editorFooter'><span macro='message views.editor.tagPrompt'></span><span macro='tagChooser'></span></div>
<div macro="showWhen tiddler.tags.contains('Depth Psychology')">
Advisor: <span macro="edit advisor"></span>
<div macro="showWhen tiddler.tags.contains('Depth Psychology')">
Methodology: <span macro="edit methodology"></span>
<div macro="showWhen tiddler.tags.contains('Depth Psychology')">
External reader: <span macro="edit externalreader"></span>
</div>
<!--}}}-->
~MacWilliams, D. (2002). //Embodied dialogue with place: Intentional engagement of the world//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3060738|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=764772991&sid=6&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
The purpose of this study was to deeply attend to the experiences and images arising from an intentional embodied dialogue with place and the things of place. A phenomenological approach, including heuristic, hermeneutical, participatory, intuitive inquiry, and case study components, was employed. Research participants in Bend, Oregon intentionally engaged their daily placescapes over a nine-week period bracketed by individual, open-ended interviews. The interim consisted of five, weekly group sessions in the council/dialogue format. Participants worked with clay to express and/or allow images of place experience to be embodied. The images were actively brought into the group dialogue. Three adults and one teenager, two females and two males, completed the participant roster.

Data from interviews, group dialogues, the clay images, and individual case studies revealed the complexity of human relationship to place and the inadequacy of the English language to describe the movement and essence of embodied dialogue with non-human places and things. Place interactions revealed multiple layers of reciprocal connection and disconnection. Disconnection, defined as psychic numbing, was evident at both the personal and collective/cultural levels. There were varying degrees of numbness to body and place. The participants described this as an American legacy of overemphasis on independence and non-attachment. There was a gradual and gentle increase in individual and group awareness to psychic numbness of body and place as the intentional place interactions, group dialogue, and clay imaging unfolded. Movement toward place connection led to increased energy, creativity, and imaginal fertilization.

The nature of dialogue and embodied dialogue with place was explored, as was the built environment as both symptom of disconnection and expression of cultivated dialogue. Issues of beauty and ugliness arose, as did episodes of grief. The study effects included an increased appreciation and capacity for imaginal and body ways of knowing and, in some cases, an increased differentiation of self, without disconnection, when relating to place. The researcher calls for a developmental theory of relationship to place and notes similarities between the place relationship process and relational developmental theory, especially in the areas of complex differentiation without disconnection.
<<<
Anissian, M. (2005). //Eros in Sufism: Journey to Mystical Love//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2005). (Publication No. [[AAT 3222025|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1172081951&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
Sufism is a living mystical path. The present and past great Sufis, despite the difficulty of expressing their states, have left us glimpses and footprints of their journey. Their mystical secrets and wisdom of love have been passed from heart to heart in different cultures.

As Sufis experienced it, only he or she who travels the path and drinks the wine of fana (annihilation) knows the Divine secrets. Mystical love is not a matter of a point of view or an intellectual position, it is a real state of Being, in which the Divine Reality is one with the being of the lover. Only then is one able to reveal the secrets and mysteries of this love, although the great Sufi mystics repeatedly indicated that love cannot be explained or described.

Sufis maintain that one must experience journeying on the path, guided by a true master, in order to approach God, who can only be reached through the heart, not through the mind or any aspect of self or nafs (ego) -based consciousness. One can only understand the Divine union when experiencing it on a deeper level and arriving at the station of mystical Love and Union.

I employed the mystical hermeneutic ( ta'wil ) methodology for this study. The Arabic word ta'wil means "to cause to return." The journey through the stages of love requires the transformation of the soul. This transformation is the ta'wil, the spiritual exegesis, which leads the soul back to its origin. Sufis are lovers whose quest is union with the Beloved. These eminent Sufis have repeatedly emphasized the incapacity of words and concepts to express the truth. They only attempt to convey the unity by their being, reflected in their poems and writings. Only then can their work cause an alchemical transformation in the human soul.

This research will review and illustrate the stages of the mystical journey traveled by the eminent Sufis, as well as their experiences and views of how one might attain these spiritual stages and stations to arrive at the final station of Love and Union.
<<<
Lee, G. (2007). //Excavating memories, reconstructing narratives: The Nikkei diaspora and the American transnational experience//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2007). (Publication No. [[AAT 3281481|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1404353851&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
This hermeneutic study addresses the cultural aspects of psyche, utilizing depth psychology, colonial and postcolonial studies and Asian American studies. From these fields it constructs a multi-disciplinary perspective from which to view and interpret the experiences of the Nikkei (Japanese) diaspora over two generations in the U.S. and Hawaii from 1868 to 1941. Depth psychology states that the truth shall set us free, meaning the truth about ourselves and our life experiences. However, for the individual, truth is oftentimes a scarce commodity; it is not always apparent, often resisted or repressed by the ego and hidden in the deep reaches of our personal and collective unconscious. For cultures and societies, certain truths are also resisted, silenced by a dominant or hegemonic narrative and restricted by their social character (collective psychological perception). Yet, we cannot know who we are today, nor envision the possibilities of our tomorrow, until we discover the truth of our yesterday. From this perspective, remembering cultural and collective memory is not just about historical facts but about recovering lost fragments and projections of our psychic selves. For the Nikkei community the past is a story of negation, assimilation, and resistance. This study identifies the dominant narratives, key historical events, and social processes that reflect those experiences and which, in turn, shaped the development of the Nikkei collective ego over its first two generations. By "excavating" these silenced memories it begins to reconstruct the collective self and discovers the emergence of a "transnational" psyche. However, within the Nikkei story is also the story of a rapidly industrializing "white" America and its economic, political, cultural, and psychological evolution. This work utilizes the archetype of the scapegoat to understand and interpret the psychological relationship between these two communities, and to reveal the larger psycho-social forces at work in the late 19 th and early 20 th centuries. It suggests that these forces are still present and are, in fact, manifesting again today.
<<<
Lay, R. (2006). //Exploring Subjectivity In the Work of Jung, Heidegger, and Corbin Through an Artistic Dialogue of Film//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3238868|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1251887451&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This work attempts to explore the transcendent nature of subjectivity through a method it develops and deems the "artistic dialogue." The theories of Jung, Heidegger, and Corbin, each consider individual subjectivity to rest upon a more fundamental, transpersonal base, that is thought to be, in its expansiveness, largely incomprehensible and incommunicable within the constructs of conventional language. Because such a transcendent layer seems "incomprehensible," this work has (1) sought to understand it. Because it seems "incommunicable," this project has (2) sought for a means by which to express what understanding maybe achieved. And because it has "transcendent," "transpersonal" aspects, this effort has (3) sought to develop a method by which it could be interpersonally, or intertranscendently studied, shared, and valorized.

Understanding the experience, without reducing its mystery, was facilitated by Jung's work on "the transcendent function," which was disencumbered from the dualities of Cartesianism, as well as the dichotomies of Kant's phenomenon-noumenon split, via Heidegger's existential phenomenology of Being, which was, in turn, liberated from the repression of the Imaginal dimensions, through Corbin's hermeneutics of ta'wil and the traditions of esoteric Islam. A language potentially compatible with expressing the experience was found in the poietic mode of cinema, utilizing film's basic palette of intentionality, and its natural capacity to express experience with experience. To employ such expression interpersonally, the method of the "artistic dialogue" was developed, in which, another filmmaker could reciprocate in kind, could respond to a filmic "statement" with a filmic "response." Such a "dialogue" was designed to iteratively evolve a single, cinematic piece, standing at each moment as the symbol of the degree of mutual understanding achieved, phenomenally embodying the intersubjective, or intertranscendent aspects of the interaction. This method required a different approach, not only to the creative side of cinema, but to the viewing side as well. Through such notions as the "preservation of disbelief" and "intentionality as symbol," this work has sought to overcome the pitfalls of the pure aesthetic attitude, allowing not only the characters and images of the film to arc through a transformation, but for the viewer to transform as well.
<<<
Hale (2006). //Follow the red: Exploring the archetypal experience of color//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. AAT [[3238860|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1251887421&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
Color plays a powerful role in human experience, yet little attention has been paid to its archetypal aspects and implications. Although it is a phenomenon that utilizes&mdash;and, indeed, requires&mdash;both the physical process of sensation and the psychological process of perception, color most often is studied and understood from a perspective that emphasizes a single aspect of its unified complexity. Depth psychology&mdash;with an emphasis on the dialogue between consciousness and the unconscious, Jung's theory of psychoid archetypes, and Hillman's archetypal imaginal perspective&mdash;offers a unique framework that can unify, rather than separate, different aspects of a phenomenon such as color.

Red is explored across disciplines and cultures as a universally primary color associated with the strong emotions of an experiential image, symbol, and archetype. Utilizing hermeneutic methodology and imaginal approaches, my research engages with manifestations of red as textual data found in ritual, myth, alchemy, literature, theater, opera, film, and graphic art.

The major themes of this research indicate that red frequently appears related to transition and change, and more specifically, to the embodied tensions of ambivalent and often conflictual emotional extremes. In its liminal aspects, red often is related to the threshold between the literal and symbolic realms of life and death. This color is not entirely of the physical world and not entirely of the realm of psychoid archetypes, yet has qualities of both, connecting the two realms of psyche and matter.

Red expresses various emotional aspects of the primordial powers associated with the mysteries of life and death. Although one aspect may be emphasized more than another in a particular red image, the color contains both the creative life-preserving energies of Eros and the aggressive, destructive energies of Thanatos described by Freud. Red's strong physical and psychological qualities can unify opposing forces and contradictions related to these energies and thus can indicate the opportunity for transformation. Through the intensity of red, we are drawn to experience and express the mysteries of Eros and Thanatos more fully.
<<<
/***
|''Name:''|ForEachTiddlerPlugin|
|''Version:''|1.0.8 (2007-04-12)|
|''Source:''|http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/#ForEachTiddlerPlugin|
|''Author:''|UdoBorkowski (ub [at] abego-software [dot] de)|
|''Licence:''|[[BSD open source license (abego Software)|http://www.abego-software.de/legal/apl-v10.html]]|
|''Copyright:''|&copy; 2005-2007 [[abego Software|http://www.abego-software.de]]|
|''TiddlyWiki:''|1.2.38+, 2.0|
|''Browser:''|Firefox 1.0.4+; Firefox 1.5; InternetExplorer 6.0|
!Description

Create customizable lists, tables etc. for your selections of tiddlers. Specify the tiddlers to include and their order through a powerful language.

''Syntax:'' 
|>|{{{<<}}}''forEachTiddler'' [''in'' //tiddlyWikiPath//] [''where'' //whereCondition//] [''sortBy'' //sortExpression// [''ascending'' //or// ''descending'']] [''script'' //scriptText//] [//action// [//actionParameters//]]{{{>>}}}|
|//tiddlyWikiPath//|The filepath to the TiddlyWiki the macro should work on. When missing the current TiddlyWiki is used.|
|//whereCondition//|(quoted) JavaScript boolean expression. May refer to the build-in variables {{{tiddler}}} and  {{{context}}}.|
|//sortExpression//|(quoted) JavaScript expression returning "comparable" objects (using '{{{<}}}','{{{>}}}','{{{==}}}'. May refer to the build-in variables {{{tiddler}}} and  {{{context}}}.|
|//scriptText//|(quoted) JavaScript text. Typically defines JavaScript functions that are called by the various JavaScript expressions (whereClause, sortClause, action arguments,...)|
|//action//|The action that should be performed on every selected tiddler, in the given order. By default the actions [[addToList|AddToListAction]] and [[write|WriteAction]] are supported. When no action is specified [[addToList|AddToListAction]]  is used.|
|//actionParameters//|(action specific) parameters the action may refer while processing the tiddlers (see action descriptions for details). <<tiddler [[JavaScript in actionParameters]]>>|
|>|~~Syntax formatting: Keywords in ''bold'', optional parts in [...]. 'or' means that exactly one of the two alternatives must exist.~~|

See details see [[ForEachTiddlerMacro]] and [[ForEachTiddlerExamples]].

!Revision history
* v1.0.8 (2007-04-12)
** Adapted to latest TiddlyWiki 2.2 Beta importTiddlyWiki API (introduced with changeset 2004). TiddlyWiki 2.2 Beta builds prior to changeset 2004 are no longer supported (but TiddlyWiki 2.1 and earlier, of cause)
* v1.0.7 (2007-03-28)
** Also support "pre" formatted TiddlyWikis (introduced with TW 2.2) (when using "in" clause to work on external tiddlers)
* v1.0.6 (2006-09-16)
** Context provides "viewerTiddler", i.e. the tiddler used to view the macro. Most times this is equal to the "inTiddler", but when using the "tiddler" macro both may be different.
** Support "begin", "end" and "none" expressions in "write" action
* v1.0.5 (2006-02-05)
** Pass tiddler containing the macro with wikify, context object also holds reference to tiddler containing the macro ("inTiddler"). Thanks to SimonBaird.
** Support Firefox 1.5.0.1
** Internal
*** Make "JSLint" conform
*** "Only install once"
* v1.0.4 (2006-01-06)
** Support TiddlyWiki 2.0
* v1.0.3 (2005-12-22)
** Features: 
*** Write output to a file supports multi-byte environments (Thanks to Bram Chen) 
*** Provide API to access the forEachTiddler functionality directly through JavaScript (see getTiddlers and performMacro)
** Enhancements:
*** Improved error messages on InternetExplorer.
* v1.0.2 (2005-12-10)
** Features: 
*** context object also holds reference to store (TiddlyWiki)
** Fixed Bugs: 
*** ForEachTiddler 1.0.1 has broken support on win32 Opera 8.51 (Thanks to BrunoSabin for reporting)
* v1.0.1 (2005-12-08)
** Features: 
*** Access tiddlers stored in separated TiddlyWikis through the "in" option. I.e. you are no longer limited to only work on the "current TiddlyWiki".
*** Write output to an external file using the "toFile" option of the "write" action. With this option you may write your customized tiddler exports.
*** Use the "script" section to define "helper" JavaScript functions etc. to be used in the various JavaScript expressions (whereClause, sortClause, action arguments,...).
*** Access and store context information for the current forEachTiddler invocation (through the build-in "context" object) .
*** Improved script evaluation (for where/sort clause and write scripts).
* v1.0.0 (2005-11-20)
** initial version

!Code
***/
//{{{

	
//============================================================================
//============================================================================
//		   ForEachTiddlerPlugin
//============================================================================
//============================================================================

// Only install once
if (!version.extensions.ForEachTiddlerPlugin) {

if (!window.abego) window.abego = {};

version.extensions.ForEachTiddlerPlugin = {
	major: 1, minor: 0, revision: 8, 
	date: new Date(2007,3,12), 
	source: "http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/#ForEachTiddlerPlugin",
	licence: "[[BSD open source license (abego Software)|http://www.abego-software.de/legal/apl-v10.html]]",
	copyright: "Copyright (c) abego Software GmbH, 2005-2007 (www.abego-software.de)"
};

// For backward compatibility with TW 1.2.x
//
if (!TiddlyWiki.prototype.forEachTiddler) {
	TiddlyWiki.prototype.forEachTiddler = function(callback) {
		for(var t in this.tiddlers) {
			callback.call(this,t,this.tiddlers[t]);
		}
	};
}

//============================================================================
// forEachTiddler Macro
//============================================================================

version.extensions.forEachTiddler = {
	major: 1, minor: 0, revision: 8, date: new Date(2007,3,12), provider: "http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de"};

// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Configurations and constants 
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

config.macros.forEachTiddler = {
	 // Standard Properties
	 label: "forEachTiddler",
	 prompt: "Perform actions on a (sorted) selection of tiddlers",

	 // actions
	 actions: {
		 addToList: {},
		 write: {}
	 }
};

// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
//  The forEachTiddler Macro Handler 
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

config.macros.forEachTiddler.getContainingTiddler = function(e) {
	while(e && !hasClass(e,"tiddler"))
		e = e.parentNode;
	var title = e ? e.getAttribute("tiddler") : null; 
	return title ? store.getTiddler(title) : null;
};

config.macros.forEachTiddler.handler = function(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
	// config.macros.forEachTiddler.traceMacroCall(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler);

	if (!tiddler) tiddler = config.macros.forEachTiddler.getContainingTiddler(place);
	// --- Parsing ------------------------------------------

	var i = 0; // index running over the params
	// Parse the "in" clause
	var tiddlyWikiPath = undefined;
	if ((i < params.length) && params[i] == "in") {
		i++;
		if (i >= params.length) {
			this.handleError(place, "TiddlyWiki path expected behind 'in'.");
			return;
		}
		tiddlyWikiPath = this.paramEncode((i < params.length) ? params[i] : "");
		i++;
	}

	// Parse the where clause
	var whereClause ="true";
	if ((i < params.length) && params[i] == "where") {
		i++;
		whereClause = this.paramEncode((i < params.length) ? params[i] : "");
		i++;
	}

	// Parse the sort stuff
	var sortClause = null;
	var sortAscending = true; 
	if ((i < params.length) && params[i] == "sortBy") {
		i++;
		if (i >= params.length) {
			this.handleError(place, "sortClause missing behind 'sortBy'.");
			return;
		}
		sortClause = this.paramEncode(params[i]);
		i++;

		if ((i < params.length) && (params[i] == "ascending" || params[i] == "descending")) {
			 sortAscending = params[i] == "ascending";
			 i++;
		}
	}

	// Parse the script
	var scriptText = null;
	if ((i < params.length) && params[i] == "script") {
		i++;
		scriptText = this.paramEncode((i < params.length) ? params[i] : "");
		i++;
	}

	// Parse the action. 
	// When we are already at the end use the default action
	var actionName = "addToList";
	if (i < params.length) {
	   if (!config.macros.forEachTiddler.actions[params[i]]) {
			this.handleError(place, "Unknown action '"+params[i]+"'.");
			return;
		} else {
			actionName = params[i]; 
			i++;
		}
	} 
	
	// Get the action parameter
	// (the parsing is done inside the individual action implementation.)
	var actionParameter = params.slice(i);


	// --- Processing ------------------------------------------
	try {
		this.performMacro({
				place: place, 
				inTiddler: tiddler,
				whereClause: whereClause, 
				sortClause: sortClause, 
				sortAscending: sortAscending, 
				actionName: actionName, 
				actionParameter: actionParameter, 
				scriptText: scriptText, 
				tiddlyWikiPath: tiddlyWikiPath});

	} catch (e) {
		this.handleError(place, e);
	}
};

// Returns an object with properties "tiddlers" and "context".
// tiddlers holds the (sorted) tiddlers selected by the parameter,
// context the context of the execution of the macro.
//
// The action is not yet performed.
//
// @parameter see performMacro
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.getTiddlersAndContext = function(parameter) {

	var context = config.macros.forEachTiddler.createContext(parameter.place, parameter.whereClause, parameter.sortClause, parameter.sortAscending, parameter.actionName, parameter.actionParameter, parameter.scriptText, parameter.tiddlyWikiPath, parameter.inTiddler);

	var tiddlyWiki = parameter.tiddlyWikiPath ? this.loadTiddlyWiki(parameter.tiddlyWikiPath) : store;
	context["tiddlyWiki"] = tiddlyWiki;
	
	// Get the tiddlers, as defined by the whereClause
	var tiddlers = this.findTiddlers(parameter.whereClause, context, tiddlyWiki);
	context["tiddlers"] = tiddlers;

	// Sort the tiddlers, when sorting is required.
	if (parameter.sortClause) {
		this.sortTiddlers(tiddlers, parameter.sortClause, parameter.sortAscending, context);
	}

	return {tiddlers: tiddlers, context: context};
};

// Returns the (sorted) tiddlers selected by the parameter.
//
// The action is not yet performed.
//
// @parameter see performMacro
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.getTiddlers = function(parameter) {
	return this.getTiddlersAndContext(parameter).tiddlers;
};

// Performs the macros with the given parameter.
//
// @param parameter holds the parameter of the macro as separate properties.
//				  The following properties are supported:
//
//						place
//						whereClause
//						sortClause
//						sortAscending
//						actionName
//						actionParameter
//						scriptText
//						tiddlyWikiPath
//
//					All properties are optional. 
//					For most actions the place property must be defined.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.performMacro = function(parameter) {
	var tiddlersAndContext = this.getTiddlersAndContext(parameter);

	// Perform the action
	var actionName = parameter.actionName ? parameter.actionName : "addToList";
	var action = config.macros.forEachTiddler.actions[actionName];
	if (!action) {
		this.handleError(parameter.place, "Unknown action '"+actionName+"'.");
		return;
	}

	var actionHandler = action.handler;
	actionHandler(parameter.place, tiddlersAndContext.tiddlers, parameter.actionParameter, tiddlersAndContext.context);
};

// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
//  The actions 
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

// Internal.
//
// --- The addToList Action -----------------------------------------------
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.actions.addToList.handler = function(place, tiddlers, parameter, context) {
	// Parse the parameter
	var p = 0;

	// Check for extra parameters
	if (parameter.length > p) {
		config.macros.forEachTiddler.createExtraParameterErrorElement(place, "addToList", parameter, p);
		return;
	}

	// Perform the action.
	var list = document.createElement("ul");
	place.appendChild(list);
	for (var i = 0; i < tiddlers.length; i++) {
		var tiddler = tiddlers[i];
		var listItem = document.createElement("li");
		list.appendChild(listItem);
		createTiddlyLink(listItem, tiddler.title, true);
	}
};

abego.parseNamedParameter = function(name, parameter, i) {
	var beginExpression = null;
	if ((i < parameter.length) && parameter[i] == name) {
		i++;
		if (i >= parameter.length) {
			throw "Missing text behind '%0'".format([name]);
		}
		
		return config.macros.forEachTiddler.paramEncode(parameter[i]);
	}
	return null;
}

// Internal.
//
// --- The write Action ---------------------------------------------------
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.actions.write.handler = function(place, tiddlers, parameter, context) {
	// Parse the parameter
	var p = 0;
	if (p >= parameter.length) {
		this.handleError(place, "Missing expression behind 'write'.");
		return;
	}

	var textExpression = config.macros.forEachTiddler.paramEncode(parameter[p]);
	p++;

	// Parse the "begin" option
	var beginExpression = abego.parseNamedParameter("begin", parameter, p);
	if (beginExpression !== null) 
		p += 2;
	var endExpression = abego.parseNamedParameter("end", parameter, p);
	if (endExpression !== null) 
		p += 2;
	var noneExpression = abego.parseNamedParameter("none", parameter, p);
	if (noneExpression !== null) 
		p += 2;

	// Parse the "toFile" option
	var filename = null;
	var lineSeparator = undefined;
	if ((p < parameter.length) && parameter[p] == "toFile") {
		p++;
		if (p >= parameter.length) {
			this.handleError(place, "Filename expected behind 'toFile' of 'write' action.");
			return;
		}
		
		filename = config.macros.forEachTiddler.getLocalPath(config.macros.forEachTiddler.paramEncode(parameter[p]));
		p++;
		if ((p < parameter.length) && parameter[p] == "withLineSeparator") {
			p++;
			if (p >= parameter.length) {
				this.handleError(place, "Line separator text expected behind 'withLineSeparator' of 'write' action.");
				return;
			}
			lineSeparator = config.macros.forEachTiddler.paramEncode(parameter[p]);
			p++;
		}
	}
	
	// Check for extra parameters
	if (parameter.length > p) {
		config.macros.forEachTiddler.createExtraParameterErrorElement(place, "write", parameter, p);
		return;
	}

	// Perform the action.
	var func = config.macros.forEachTiddler.getEvalTiddlerFunction(textExpression, context);
	var count = tiddlers.length;
	var text = "";
	if (count > 0 && beginExpression)
		text += config.macros.forEachTiddler.getEvalTiddlerFunction(beginExpression, context)(undefined, context, count, undefined);
	
	for (var i = 0; i < count; i++) {
		var tiddler = tiddlers[i];
		text += func(tiddler, context, count, i);
	}
	
	if (count > 0 && endExpression)
		text += config.macros.forEachTiddler.getEvalTiddlerFunction(endExpression, context)(undefined, context, count, undefined);

	if (count == 0 && noneExpression) 
		text += config.macros.forEachTiddler.getEvalTiddlerFunction(noneExpression, context)(undefined, context, count, undefined);
		

	if (filename) {
		if (lineSeparator !== undefined) {
			lineSeparator = lineSeparator.replace(/\\n/mg, "\n").replace(/\\r/mg, "\r");
			text = text.replace(/\n/mg,lineSeparator);
		}
		saveFile(filename, convertUnicodeToUTF8(text));
	} else {
		var wrapper = createTiddlyElement(place, "span");
		wikify(text, wrapper, null/* highlightRegExp */, context.inTiddler);
	}
};


// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
//  Helpers
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

// Internal.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.createContext = function(placeParam, whereClauseParam, sortClauseParam, sortAscendingParam, actionNameParam, actionParameterParam, scriptText, tiddlyWikiPathParam, inTiddlerParam) {
	return {
		place : placeParam, 
		whereClause : whereClauseParam, 
		sortClause : sortClauseParam, 
		sortAscending : sortAscendingParam, 
		script : scriptText,
		actionName : actionNameParam, 
		actionParameter : actionParameterParam,
		tiddlyWikiPath : tiddlyWikiPathParam,
		inTiddler : inTiddlerParam, // the tiddler containing the <<forEachTiddler ...>> macro call.
		viewerTiddler : config.macros.forEachTiddler.getContainingTiddler(placeParam) // the tiddler showing the forEachTiddler result
	};
};

// Internal.
//
// Returns a TiddlyWiki with the tiddlers loaded from the TiddlyWiki of 
// the given path.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.loadTiddlyWiki = function(path, idPrefix) {
	if (!idPrefix) {
		idPrefix = "store";
	}
	var lenPrefix = idPrefix.length;
	
	// Read the content of the given file
	var content = loadFile(this.getLocalPath(path));
	if(content === null) {
		throw "TiddlyWiki '"+path+"' not found.";
	}
	
	var tiddlyWiki = new TiddlyWiki();

	// Starting with TW 2.2 there is a helper function to import the tiddlers
	if (tiddlyWiki.importTiddlyWiki) {
		if (!tiddlyWiki.importTiddlyWiki(content))
			throw "File '"+path+"' is not a TiddlyWiki.";
		tiddlyWiki.dirty = false;
		return tiddlyWiki;
	}
	
	// The legacy code, for TW < 2.2
	
	// Locate the storeArea div's
	var posOpeningDiv = content.indexOf(startSaveArea);
	var posClosingDiv = content.lastIndexOf(endSaveArea);
	if((posOpeningDiv == -1) || (posClosingDiv == -1)) {
		throw "File '"+path+"' is not a TiddlyWiki.";
	}
	var storageText = content.substr(posOpeningDiv + startSaveArea.length, posClosingDiv);
	
	// Create a "div" element that contains the storage text
	var myStorageDiv = document.createElement("div");
	myStorageDiv.innerHTML = storageText;
	myStorageDiv.normalize();
	
	// Create all tiddlers in a new TiddlyWiki
	// (following code is modified copy of TiddlyWiki.prototype.loadFromDiv)
	var store = myStorageDiv.childNodes;
	for(var t = 0; t < store.length; t++) {
		var e = store[t];
		var title = null;
		if(e.getAttribute)
			title = e.getAttribute("tiddler");
		if(!title && e.id && e.id.substr(0,lenPrefix) == idPrefix)
			title = e.id.substr(lenPrefix);
		if(title && title !== "") {
			var tiddler = tiddlyWiki.createTiddler(title);
			tiddler.loadFromDiv(e,title);
		}
	}
	tiddlyWiki.dirty = false;

	return tiddlyWiki;
};


	
// Internal.
//
// Returns a function that has a function body returning the given javaScriptExpression.
// The function has the parameters:
// 
//	 (tiddler, context, count, index)
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.getEvalTiddlerFunction = function (javaScriptExpression, context) {
	var script = context["script"];
	var functionText = "var theFunction = function(tiddler, context, count, index) { return "+javaScriptExpression+"}";
	var fullText = (script ? script+";" : "")+functionText+";theFunction;";
	return eval(fullText);
};

// Internal.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.findTiddlers = function(whereClause, context, tiddlyWiki) {
	var result = [];
	var func = config.macros.forEachTiddler.getEvalTiddlerFunction(whereClause, context);
	tiddlyWiki.forEachTiddler(function(title,tiddler) {
		if (func(tiddler, context, undefined, undefined)) {
			result.push(tiddler);
		}
	});
	return result;
};

// Internal.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.createExtraParameterErrorElement = function(place, actionName, parameter, firstUnusedIndex) {
	var message = "Extra parameter behind '"+actionName+"':";
	for (var i = firstUnusedIndex; i < parameter.length; i++) {
		message += " "+parameter[i];
	}
	this.handleError(place, message);
};

// Internal.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.sortAscending = function(tiddlerA, tiddlerB) {
	var result = 
		(tiddlerA.forEachTiddlerSortValue == tiddlerB.forEachTiddlerSortValue) 
			? 0
			: (tiddlerA.forEachTiddlerSortValue < tiddlerB.forEachTiddlerSortValue)
			   ? -1 
			   : +1; 
	return result;
};

// Internal.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.sortDescending = function(tiddlerA, tiddlerB) {
	var result = 
		(tiddlerA.forEachTiddlerSortValue == tiddlerB.forEachTiddlerSortValue) 
			? 0
			: (tiddlerA.forEachTiddlerSortValue < tiddlerB.forEachTiddlerSortValue)
			   ? +1 
			   : -1; 
	return result;
};

// Internal.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.sortTiddlers = function(tiddlers, sortClause, ascending, context) {
	// To avoid evaluating the sortClause whenever two items are compared 
	// we pre-calculate the sortValue for every item in the array and store it in a 
	// temporary property ("forEachTiddlerSortValue") of the tiddlers.
	var func = config.macros.forEachTiddler.getEvalTiddlerFunction(sortClause, context);
	var count = tiddlers.length;
	var i;
	for (i = 0; i < count; i++) {
		var tiddler = tiddlers[i];
		tiddler.forEachTiddlerSortValue = func(tiddler,context, undefined, undefined);
	}

	// Do the sorting
	tiddlers.sort(ascending ? this.sortAscending : this.sortDescending);

	// Delete the temporary property that holds the sortValue.	
	for (i = 0; i < tiddlers.length; i++) {
		delete tiddlers[i].forEachTiddlerSortValue;
	}
};


// Internal.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.trace = function(message) {
	displayMessage(message);
};

// Internal.
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.traceMacroCall = function(place,macroName,params) {
	var message ="<<"+macroName;
	for (var i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
		message += " "+params[i];
	}
	message += ">>";
	displayMessage(message);
};


// Internal.
//
// Creates an element that holds an error message
// 
config.macros.forEachTiddler.createErrorElement = function(place, exception) {
	var message = (exception.description) ? exception.description : exception.toString();
	return createTiddlyElement(place,"span",null,"forEachTiddlerError","<<forEachTiddler ...>>: "+message);
};

// Internal.
//
// @param place [may be null]
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.handleError = function(place, exception) {
	if (place) {
		this.createErrorElement(place, exception);
	} else {
		throw exception;
	}
};

// Internal.
//
// Encodes the given string.
//
// Replaces 
//	 "$))" to ">>"
//	 "$)" to ">"
//
config.macros.forEachTiddler.paramEncode = function(s) {
	var reGTGT = new RegExp("\\$\\)\\)","mg");
	var reGT = new RegExp("\\$\\)","mg");
	return s.replace(reGTGT, ">>").replace(reGT, ">");
};

// Internal.
//
// Returns the given original path (that is a file path, starting with "file:")
// as a path to a local file, in the systems native file format.
//
// Location information in the originalPath (i.e. the "#" and stuff following)
// is stripped.
// 
config.macros.forEachTiddler.getLocalPath = function(originalPath) {
	// Remove any location part of the URL
	var hashPos = originalPath.indexOf("#");
	if(hashPos != -1)
		originalPath = originalPath.substr(0,hashPos);
	// Convert to a native file format assuming
	// "file:///x:/path/path/path..." - pc local file --> "x:\path\path\path..."
	// "file://///server/share/path/path/path..." - FireFox pc network file --> "\\server\share\path\path\path..."
	// "file:///path/path/path..." - mac/unix local file --> "/path/path/path..."
	// "file://server/share/path/path/path..." - pc network file --> "\\server\share\path\path\path..."
	var localPath;
	if(originalPath.charAt(9) == ":") // pc local file
		localPath = unescape(originalPath.substr(8)).replace(new RegExp("/","g"),"\\");
	else if(originalPath.indexOf("file://///") === 0) // FireFox pc network file
		localPath = "\\\\" + unescape(originalPath.substr(10)).replace(new RegExp("/","g"),"\\");
	else if(originalPath.indexOf("file:///") === 0) // mac/unix local file
		localPath = unescape(originalPath.substr(7));
	else if(originalPath.indexOf("file:/") === 0) // mac/unix local file
		localPath = unescape(originalPath.substr(5));
	else // pc network file
		localPath = "\\\\" + unescape(originalPath.substr(7)).replace(new RegExp("/","g"),"\\");	
	return localPath;
};

// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Stylesheet Extensions (may be overridden by local StyleSheet)
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
//
setStylesheet(
	".forEachTiddlerError{color: #ffffff;background-color: #880000;}",
	"forEachTiddler");

//============================================================================
// End of forEachTiddler Macro
//============================================================================


//============================================================================
// String.startsWith Function
//============================================================================
//
// Returns true if the string starts with the given prefix, false otherwise.
//
version.extensions["String.startsWith"] = {major: 1, minor: 0, revision: 0, date: new Date(2005,11,20), provider: "http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de"};
//
String.prototype.startsWith = function(prefix) {
	var n =  prefix.length;
	return (this.length >= n) && (this.slice(0, n) == prefix);
};



//============================================================================
// String.endsWith Function
//============================================================================
//
// Returns true if the string ends with the given suffix, false otherwise.
//
version.extensions["String.endsWith"] = {major: 1, minor: 0, revision: 0, date: new Date(2005,11,20), provider: "http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de"};
//
String.prototype.endsWith = function(suffix) {
	var n = suffix.length;
	return (this.length >= n) && (this.right(n) == suffix);
};


//============================================================================
// String.contains Function
//============================================================================
//
// Returns true when the string contains the given substring, false otherwise.
//
version.extensions["String.contains"] = {major: 1, minor: 0, revision: 0, date: new Date(2005,11,20), provider: "http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de"};
//
String.prototype.contains = function(substring) {
	return this.indexOf(substring) >= 0;
};

//============================================================================
// Array.indexOf Function
//============================================================================
//
// Returns the index of the first occurance of the given item in the array or 
// -1 when no such item exists.
//
// @param item [may be null]
//
version.extensions["Array.indexOf"] = {major: 1, minor: 0, revision: 0, date: new Date(2005,11,20), provider: "http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de"};
//
Array.prototype.indexOf = function(item) {
	for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
		if (this[i] == item) {
			return i;
		}
	}
	return -1;
};

//============================================================================
// Array.contains Function
//============================================================================
//
// Returns true when the array contains the given item, otherwise false. 
//
// @param item [may be null]
//
version.extensions["Array.contains"] = {major: 1, minor: 0, revision: 0, date: new Date(2005,11,20), provider: "http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de"};
//
Array.prototype.contains = function(item) {
	return (this.indexOf(item) >= 0);
};

//============================================================================
// Array.containsAny Function
//============================================================================
//
// Returns true when the array contains at least one of the elements 
// of the item. Otherwise (or when items contains no elements) false is returned.
//
version.extensions["Array.containsAny"] = {major: 1, minor: 0, revision: 0, date: new Date(2005,11,20), provider: "http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de"};
//
Array.prototype.containsAny = function(items) {
	for(var i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
		if (this.contains(items[i])) {
			return true;
		}
	}
	return false;
};


//============================================================================
// Array.containsAll Function
//============================================================================
//
// Returns true when the array contains all the items, otherwise false.
// 
// When items is null false is returned (even if the array contains a null).
//
// @param items [may be null] 
//
version.extensions["Array.containsAll"] = {major: 1, minor: 0, revision: 0, date: new Date(2005,11,20), provider: "http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de"};
//
Array.prototype.containsAll = function(items) {
	for(var i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
		if (!this.contains(items[i])) {
			return false;
		}
	}
	return true;
};


} // of "install only once"

// Used Globals (for JSLint) ==============
// ... DOM
/*global 	document */
// ... TiddlyWiki Core
/*global 	convertUnicodeToUTF8, createTiddlyElement, createTiddlyLink, 
			displayMessage, endSaveArea, hasClass, loadFile, saveFile, 
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/***
!Licence and Copyright
Copyright (c) abego Software ~GmbH, 2005 ([[www.abego-software.de|http://www.abego-software.de]])

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification,
are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this
list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this
list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other
materials provided with the distribution.

Neither the name of abego Software nor the names of its contributors may be
used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific
prior written permission.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS "AS IS" AND ANY
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT
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TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR
BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN
CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN
ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH
DAMAGE.
***/
Tochluk, S. I. (2005). //Friends, teachers, witnesses, healers: Whiteness and cross-race friendship//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2005). (Publication No. [[AAT 3187923|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=994250631&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
Race continues to affect people's lives in the United States today. Racial identity, however, is left uninvestigated by most whites. This allows whites to remain unconscious of the impacts racial placement has on their psyche and social relationships. Depth psychology is only recently awakening to this issue. This study uses a participatory hermeneutic methodology involving individual and pair interviews to investigate the experience of enduring cross-race friendship between whites and people of color who are over 35 years of age. Thematic chapters offer answers to the following questions: what is the lived experience of being in a cross-race friendship? What role does conflict related to issues of race and the perception of whiteness play within the friendships? How do participants see whiteness? How does this perception play a role within the friendship? To what degree do participants move against the cultural norm in choices of employment, housing, and personal relationships? Finally, how do people who confront issues of race extensively still feel challenged by embedded whiteness that erupts from the unconscious? Findings indicate that depth psychology must investigate links between individuation and racial identity awareness and re-imagine differentiation to include the effects of racial conditioning. Evidence suggests that cross-race friendships can add to whites' and people of color's individuation process. Findings also highlight the link between the numbing effects of splitting and dissociation within our social and psychic realms and our ability to perceive suffering in the world around us. Evidence indicates that there is a relationship between the social and psychic dissociations in terms of race, specifically concerning isolation and emotional restriction associated with whiteness. Lastly, this investigation considers possibilities for collective healing through the concept of "witnessing" and its requirements of obligation and vigilance. Included is the need to face the history of whiteness and work through what it means to be "white" in the United States today as we develop an "ethic of love" that can broaden our sense of self in relation to the world.
<<<
Todd, J. (2006). //Grieving with the unborn//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3247255|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1253490271&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
Grieving with the Unborn, re-conceives the contentious abortion controversy, exploring it as a symptom of culture crying out, asking us to remember what has been lost and remains unborn. It re-imagines the debate as an imperative call from Soul's imaginal landscape. Following the complex research approach introduced at Pacifica Graduate Institute by Romanyshyn and Goodchild this study tends the fires of the controversy using the alchemical hermeneutic method. As this method transformed me—the controversy's messages gained new meaning—culture was re-viewed. Following the complex research process revealed Soul's concealed spiral pathways. Working with the transference materials from reveries, synchronicities, dreams, and symptoms as well as imaginal dialogues with The Old Woman, the Divine Child, and others forced me to confront complexes and biases. Responding to the study's vocational call re-viewed the vehement either/or Pro Choice and Pro Life paradoxes as a longing for connection with archetypal energies. Holding the tension between the two polarized points of view, birthed something entirely new—a space-in-between. I found a voice for choice that supports Life. It is possible to be pro Life without being anti-choice. Insights accompanied this breakthrough. Soul, belonging to neither mind nor matter, adds depth to the polarized and apparently irreconcilable impasse of this modern-day Life and Death drama. Western culture's unconscious longing for and identification with the Savior and Hero complexes fuels self-righteous certainty. Marginalization and dissociation from Soul's archetypal-imaginal realm energizes the debate. Unexpectedly this study unveils the West's unconscious longing for coniunctio between Wisdom and Reason, Eros and Logos. Soul's presence in the debate births new consciousness. This consciousness re-weaves personal and cultural experiences and insights into a new tapestry of Life which includes Death, choice, and voice. The study exposes a culture that is grieving for what is aborted—unborn—the Sacred Feminine, Nature, and embodied knowing. Paradoxically the militant Pro Life contingent is re-viewed as a passionate guardian of the invisible. This debate, when re-conceived as culture's symptomatic voice revisions the violent dispute. It becomes an invitation to breakthrough in the face of a cultural breakdown. Re-conceived, the controversy reveals an enantiadromia is underway in the West. It suggests that a kairos —a perfect moment—is upon us. It is time to birth Soul into Life.
<<<
Paul, S. (2003). //Gypsy as symbol of soul and its exile//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3084880|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765388261&sid=7&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
At a time when the potency of the Christian symbols is waning, this dissertation looks at my personal 35-year engagement with the Gypsy image. After the "visit" of an actual Gypsy woman in my basement, her image began to appear in my dreams and poetry, and ultimately this image led me to Pacifica and the selection of this dissertation topic. This journey seems to illustrate Jung's belief in the importance of individual symbol formation and the freedom to stick with the image and ultimately express it.

The questions emanating from this endeavor were: could this Gypsy image be a symbol of my soul and its exile, could it also serve that function for the hundreds of artists and writers who have expressed this image, and finally how could honoring this image affect the historically strained relationships between Gypsies/Roma and non-Gypsies/Roma?

The method was self-selecting. Employing the hermeneutic method was ultimately a marriage between the Gypsy image and her close relative, Hermes. The circumambulating pair has become both the method and the topic. By moving with the image through my individuation process, along with an examination of the lives of some of the artists and writers who have expressed the image; then by "seeing through" the image; and finally by envisioning a liberatory space in the margins for the possibility of healed relationships between Gypsies/Roma and non-Roma, this journey seems to corroborate Jung's assertion of the transformational possibility of being true to an image in general and the Gypsy image in particular.
<<<
/***
| Name|HideWhenPlugin|
| Description|Allows conditional inclusion/exclusion in templates|
| Version|3.0 ($Rev: 1845 $)|
| Date|$Date: 2007-03-16 15:19:22 +1000 (Fri, 16 Mar 2007) $|
| Source|http://mptw.tiddlyspot.com/#HideWhenPlugin|
| Author|Simon Baird <simon.baird@gmail.com>|
| License|http://mptw.tiddlyspot.com/#TheBSDLicense|
For use in ViewTemplate and EditTemplate. Example usage:
{{{<div macro="showWhenTagged Task">[[TaskToolbar]]</div>}}}
{{{<div macro="showWhen tiddler.modifier == 'BartSimpson'"><img src="bart.gif"/></div>}}}
***/
//{{{

window.removeElementWhen = function(test,place) {
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};

merge(config.macros,{

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		removeElementWhen( !eval(paramString), place);
	}},

	hideWhenTagged: { handler: function (place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
		removeElementWhen( tiddler.tags.containsAll(params), place);
	}},

	showWhenTagged: { handler: function (place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
		removeElementWhen( !tiddler.tags.containsAll(params), place);
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	hideWhenTaggedAny: { handler: function (place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
		removeElementWhen( tiddler.tags.containsAny(params), place);
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		removeElementWhen( !tiddler.tags.containsAny(params), place);
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	hideWhenTaggedAll: { handler: function (place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
		removeElementWhen( tiddler.tags.containsAll(params), place);
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	showWhenTaggedAll: { handler: function (place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
		removeElementWhen( !tiddler.tags.containsAll(params), place);
	}},

	hideWhenExists: { handler: function(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
		removeElementWhen( store.tiddlerExists(params[0]) || store.isShadowTiddler(params[0]), place);
	}},

	showWhenExists: { handler: function(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
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});

//}}}
Held, C. A. (2006). //Horse girl: An archetypal study of women, horses, and trauma healing//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3264662|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1328075281&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
This study investigates archetypal connections between women and horses to explore why increasing numbers of girls and women have been drawn to own horses and participate in equine-related activities. An alchemical hermeneutic method is used. The theoretical dissertation's structure is based on the author's poem, //Horse Girl// (2002). The poem describes a healing of the split that occurred six thousand years ago when the domestication of horses led to the traumatic domination of peaceful, goddess-worshipping cultures, ushering in warfare and patriarchal control as the norm. The simultaneous loss of freedom of women and horses is investigated through horse goddess myths, film, literature, imaginal dialogues, and experiences, as well as clinical and historical evidence. Pivotal myths include Saranyu, the runaway Hindu horse goddess, Celtic horse goddesses Epona, Macha, and Rhiannon, and the Greek myths of Demeter and her daughters, as well as Medusa, and Chiron. Native American myths of stallion brides are also surveyed. The runaway bride archetype emerges from a review of literature and film portrayals of women and horses. Her male counterpart is the wounded healer/horse whisperer. The rise in woman-initiated divorce, the walkaway wife archetype, and the increase in women-headed households suggest a failure of marriage to support women's autonomy and authenticity. Key findings of the study include the predator-prey relationship and its ramifications in gender, cultural, inter-species, and intrapsychic relationships. The study explores the possibility that women and beings with extra-sensitive nervous systems have unique responses to trauma. The remarkable survival of the horse over 58 million years is chronicled along with the special abilities and expanded awareness that humans can learn through being with horses. The study investigates horse abuse and contrasts it with ancient horse sacrifices. This study proposes that trauma healing, intuition, sociosensual awareness, women's and horses' leadership and non-verbal skills, spiritual awareness, and survival skills can be enhanced through learning from horses. This study has important implications for women's studies, ecopsychology, trauma healing, equine-assisted therapy, gender studies, and leadership studies. The study advocates depth psychological healing technologies that utilize body-awareness, myth, and the creative arts therapies in trauma treatment.
<<<
Stolz, D. E. (2006). //I am not I: The many faces of psyche in the workplace//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3264674|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1328047921&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
Corporations are the dominant social institutions of the 21 st century. Worldwide, they not only shape the nature of our lives as consumers, but they also influence how we imagine reality. For employees, corporations are places of ideals, incomplete inner relationships, phantasies, ancient memories, and primitive forces. We enlist corporations to serve us psychologically by providing identity, meaning, defense systems, and a theater for our psychic projections. However, in that process, individuals are altered as well as a result of the interplay of ego consciousness, personal unconscious, social systems, and the collective consciousness and unconscious. The individual-group relationship is reciprocal. Our lived experience within a corporation reflects a field composed of individual and collective dynamics. The field is woven by the intersection of subjectivities, the interplay of untold numbers of psychic agents, conscious and unconscious. The resulting patterns we experience are determined in part by how deeply the agents are connected to each other and how diverse their relationships. This theoretical dissertation explores the resulting subjectivity. The hermeneutic research explores this subjectivity through the theoretical lens of Freud, Jung, Klein, and subsequent theorists. Following Jung's idea of "splinter psyches" and Klein's view of inner objects, this study considers psyche to be plural and protean, that is, capable of assuming many forms while it operates in an intersubjective field. As a result, a new concept has been introduced: corporate complexes. They arise as emergent properties from this psychoactive field, providing a third, bridging structure linking the collective and the individual. They produce the experience of corporation-in-the-mind while also providing psychological space for the individual to transfer personal history onto the group encounter. Illustrations are provided to demonstrate the complexes in action. As a result of this research perspective, opportunities are identified to develop corporations as facilitating environments and support the emerging 21 st -century self.
<<<
~Gailor-Loflin, H. (2005). //Imagining Leadership, Imagining Society: Pathways to Leadership Development in Social Change Organizations//. (Publication No. [[AAT 3205596|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1092072661&sid=4&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
How do young women between the ages of 22 and 34 years-of-age develop as leaders within four different social-change organizations? This study examines three facets of this question: First, this study focuses on what motivates young women to take leadership in the context of social-change organizations. Second, it focuses on how working for social change in a particular arena affects a young woman's leadership development. Third, this study is interested in how organizational context affects each woman's leadership development.

A participatory-hermeneutic methodology is used for this study with interpretive lenses from depth psychology and liberation psychology. The participatory phase involves entering into co-creative relationships with the young women through informal observation, dialogue, and interviews. The second phase involves developing interpretive reflections through the hermeneutic process.

This study answers its primary research questions by providing insight into what motivates these young women to work for social change, both external motivations (family, mentors, volunteerism, travel, and personal and collective history) and internal archetypal impulses (the scapegoat, the warrior, and the savior). The study outlines how organizational experiences of community, key relationships, and interaction with clients all influence the young women's leadership development. The study also explains various tensions plaguing the research participants that affect leadership development, such as making decisions between money and meaning, negotiating the tension between the fantasy and the reality of social change work, and deciding what it means to be both a woman and an activist. Finally, the study outlines the leadership lessons gained through social change work and compares these lessons to The Working Ensemble's (1996) Social Change Model of Leadership.

Following the results, the author applies theoretical constructs to the research findings. From depth psychology, the author interprets the results by accessing theories of political development, individuation, transference/countertransference, and archetypal psychology. From liberation psychology, the author interprets the results by applying the themes of cultural pathology/suffering and anxiety/trauma. Through the lens of gender and depth psychology, the author accesses Freudian and Jungian interpretive lenses.
<<<
Davin, A. (2003). //In My Native Tongue: Reflections From the Shore of Spirit Lake// (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. [[AAT 3119798|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765336791&sid=10&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
The idea for this Artistic Studies dissertation arose out of my experience in crossing cultures as a young wife married into a Native American community in the Southwest of the United States and a need to find spiritual residence within my Western cultural context. This study responds to the question for those people who are not rooted in continuing and living religious traditions and rituals: How can we have access to a sense of meaning or the sacred or a sense of originating from some inheritance that grounds our lives and gives them direction and value?

This study introduces a new research method using creative nonfiction essays and images that draw on the sensibilities and philosophy of phenomenological hermeneutics and heuristics to enter the material of the study that does not include research with human participants. Rather, the material of this study does include my personal experiences related to crossing cultures; the concerns of depth psychology, including Jung and liberation psychology; and, finally, the literary work of Martin Prechtel and Morris Berman, who are primary contributors to what I argue is an emerging cultural borderlands related to the West’s relationship to a sense of the sacred. Ultimately, this study, along with Prechtel’s and Berman’s work, builds on the traditions of indigenous spiritual value systems while offering a postmodern critique of the West’s sense of the sacred. By doing so, the study reveals the West’s need to re-enchant the matter of our living through a renewed sense and relationship with what Prechtel (2000) calls the “invisible force behind all this visible life’ (p. 256).
<<<
Chalquist, C. (2003). //In The Shadow Of Cross And Sword: Imagining A Psychoanalysis Of Place//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3119806|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765336801&sid=4&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
Listening in on the geographical places we inhabit as though they were clients undergoing psychotherapy, this study uncovers persistent traumatic themes that haunt two mission counties in coastal California: San Diego and San Francisco. These and other places possess an imaginal or intersubjective presence, or "voice," that attempts to address us by echoing unhealed traumas inherent in colonization and conquest down into our dreams, relationships, folklore, and even unconscious reenactments of key historical events. The instrument for amplifying this trauma-echoing voice is a "psychoanalysis of place," or locianalysis , whose key premise, as explored in the following tale of two cities, is that what Jung believed about the unconscious also applies to place: it turns toward us the face that we turn toward it, such that when ignored, the past, presence, and wounding of the overrun and heavily developed places we occupy leach down into those symptoms and struggles we normally take to be purely personal problems. By widening the tending of symptom (Freud), image (Jung), and the oppressed (~Martín-Baró) to a tending of the unheard wailing of the anima loci, locianalysis suggests that the time has come to elaborate a depth-oriented ecopsychology that draws upon the literal relations between environment and human health even while reimagining and moving beyond them.
Sgarzi, J. A. (2003). //In the labyrinth of secret: A meditation on the nature of secret//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3081678|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765326021&sid=7&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
The ubiquitous presence of secret in personal experience, cultural institutions, religious traditions, and literature invites a depth psychological inquiry into the phenomenon to better understand its enigmatic nature and purpose in psyche. As the study demonstrates, secret provides a mode of perception that moves from the inside out, the hidden to the revealed, the latent to the, manifest, hiding in order to awaken the seeker while providing an essential lure into the unknown from which psychic development and wholeness can emerge. Psyche is rife with secrets, and secret itself is a necessary fragment of psychic infrastructure.

This dissertation utilizes a hybrid methodology integrating hermeneutic textual analysis, heuristic exploration, and imaginal engagement involving active imagination, dreams, and story to explore secret's elusive nature and honor its beneficial dimensions. The method intentionally incorporates scholarship, intuition, imagination, and reverie to circumambulate secret's hidden presence, gleaning insight into its ambiguous essence. The varied perspectives of Jungian psychology, anthropology, sociology, mystical traditions, and literature also help illuminate secret's complex role in psyche, expanding understanding beyond the traditional assumptions of clinical psychology.

The study specifically suggests that secret lives as an archetypal form independent of any specific content, spanning a continuum from intentionally concealed secrets of the ego to the ineffable secrets of the Self experienced as mystery. Examination of several of its characteristic complementary pairings, including concealment and revelation, expression and silence, isolation and intimacy, wounding and healing, illustrates secret's paradoxical and dynamic nature. The experience of mystery reveals the transcendent aspect of secret, evidencing and supporting the transpersonal or religious function of the psyche witnessed in ritual, prayer, and numinous encounters, often also manifesting as intuition, imagination, and creative expression. Secret draws one deeper into the depths of both consciousness and the unconscious, serving psyche as an archetype of transformation through experiences of correspondence, compensation, initiation, individuation, intimacy, and attunement with destiny. Secret's presence also shapes experiences of space, time, boundary, threshold, and temenos while catalyzing symbolic vision or protecting fragile dimensions of psyche.
<<<
Laskowski, S. (2003). //Incest: Symbol Formation, Integration, and Transformation//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3119791|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765336761&sid=3&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
Incest is a secret that permeates our culture. A triangulated family dynamic constellates an atmosphere that allows incest to occur between fathers and daughters. When the daughter's mother (wife) is emotionally absent, the father (husband) turns to the daughter to meet his own emotional and sexual needs. This work explores the experiences of women who know incest with their fathers.

Specifically, this paper explores commonalities and dissonances within the textures of eight women's experiences of incest with their fathers. I want to know their perceptions of the experience how were these women silenced; did they hold symbols of the experience; how did they break the silence and come to voice? Further, I am curious to know how might trauma influence a developing child's mind-body connection; in what ways might psyche integrate trauma within the body; and how might psyche manifest unresolved rage within the body? What role does forgiveness play to integrate and resolve trauma? Is there a space for the numinous within the experience of incest?

A Close Reading of eight women's memoirs of incest with their fathers allows a hermeneutic exploration of specific themes within each woman's experience. With Moustakas' guidance, the heuristic senses of intuition and instinct reveal parallel personal themes of being silenced, imaging symbols of incest, and coming to voice. Heuristic knowing supports the experiences of eight women in the study. By moving with the images each woman holds of her experience, a space for the possibility of healing within the inner landscape of incest opens. Within this space it is possible to both integrate and, through knowing compassion, be transformed by the experience of incest.
<<<
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/***
|''Name:''|IntelliTaggerPlugin|
|''Version:''|1.0.2 (2007-07-25)|
|''Type:''|plugin|
|''Source:''|http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/#IntelliTaggerPlugin|
|''Author:''|Udo Borkowski (ub [at] abego-software [dot] de)|
|''Documentation:''|[[IntelliTaggerPlugin Documentation]]|
|''~SourceCode:''|[[IntelliTaggerPlugin SourceCode]]|
|''Licence:''|[[BSD open source license (abego Software)]]|
|''~CoreVersion:''|2.0.8|
|''Browser:''|Firefox 1.5.0.2 or better|
***/
/***
!Version History
* 1.0.2 (2007-07-25): 
** Feature: "Return" key may be used to accept first tag suggestion (beside "Alt-1")
** Bugfix: Keyboard shortcuts (Alt+3 etc.) shifted
* 1.0.1 (2007-05-18): Improvement: Speedup when using TiddlyWikis with many tags
* 1.0.0 (2006-04-26): Initial release

***/
// /%
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_ec=function(){if(_71&&_72&&!abego.isDescendantOrSelf(document,_72)){abego.IntelliTagger.close();}};setInterval(_ec,100);abego.IntelliTagger.displayTagSuggestions=function(_ed,_ee,_ef,_f0,_f1){_74=_ed;_75=abego.toSet(_ee);_76=_ef;_72=_f0;_73=_f1;if(!_71){_71=createTiddlyElement(document.body,"div",null,"intelliTaggerSuggestions");_71.style.position="absolute";}_ac();abego.openAsPopup(_71);if(_77()){var w=_77().offsetWidth;if(_71.offsetWidth<w){_71.style.width=(w-2*(_6e+_6f))+"px";}abego.moveBelowAndClip(_71,_77());}else{abego.centerOnWindow(_71);}_c7();};abego.IntelliTagger.assistTagging=function(_f3,_f4){var _f5=_90(_f3);var s=_f3.value;if(_7d(_f3)){s=_7a(s);}var _f7=s.readBracketedList();var _f8=_f7.length>0?abego.filterStrings(abego.internal.getTagManager().getPartnerRankedTags(_f7),_f5,_70):_a0(_f5,_70);abego.IntelliTagger.displayTagSuggestions(_a9(_f5,_f7),_f7,_f8,_f3,function(tag,e){if(e.shiftKey){onClickTag.call(this,e);}else{_85(tag,_f3,_f4);}});};abego.IntelliTagger.close=function(){abego.closePopup(_71);_71=null;return false;};abego.IntelliTagger.createEditTagsButton=function(_fb,_fc,_fd,_fe,_ff,id,_101){if(!_fd){_fd="[edit]";}if(!_fe){_fe="Edit the tags";}if(!_ff){_ff="editTags";}var _102=createTiddlyButton(_fc,_fd,_fe,_e0,_ff,id,_101);_102.setAttribute("tiddler",(_fb instanceof Tiddler)?_fb.title:String(_fb));return _102;};abego.IntelliTagger.getSuggestionTagsMaxCount=function(){return 100;};config.macros.intelliTagger={label:"intelliTagger",handler:function(_103,_104,_105,_106,_107,_108){var _109=_107.parseParams("list",null,true);var _10a=_109[0]["action"];for(var i=0;_10a&&i<_10a.length;i++){var _10c=_10a[i];var _10d=config.macros.intelliTagger.subhandlers[_10c];if(!_10d){abego.alertAndThrow("Unsupported action '%0'".format([_10c]));}_10d(_103,_104,_105,_106,_107,_108);}},subhandlers:{showTags:function(_10e,_10f,_110,_111,_112,_113){_b4(_10e,_74,_76?_76.length:0,_76,abego.IntelliTagger.getSuggestionTagsMaxCount());},showFavorites:function(_114,_115,_116,_117,_118,_119){_b4(_114,_76,0);},closeButton:function(_11a,_11b,_11c,_11d,_11e,_11f){var _120=createTiddlyButton(_11a,"close","Close the suggestions",abego.IntelliTagger.close);},version:function(_121){var t="IntelliTagger %0.%1.%2".format([version.extensions.IntelliTaggerPlugin.major,version.extensions.IntelliTaggerPlugin.minor,version.extensions.IntelliTaggerPlugin.revision]);var e=createTiddlyElement(_121,"a");e.setAttribute("href","http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/#IntelliTaggerPlugin");e.innerHTML="<font color=\"black\" face=\"Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif\">"+t+"<font>";},copyright:function(_124){var e=createTiddlyElement(_124,"a");e.setAttribute("href","http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de");e.innerHTML="<font color=\"black\" face=\"Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif\">&copy; 2006-2007 <b><font color=\"red\">abego</font></b> Software<font>";}}};})();config.shadowTiddlers["IntelliTaggerStyleSheet"]="/***\n"+"!~IntelliTagger Stylesheet\n"+"***/\n"+"/*{{{*/\n"+".intelliTaggerSuggestions {\n"+"\tposition: absolute;\n"+"\twidth: 600px;\n"+"\n"+"\tpadding: 2px;\n"+"\tlist-style: none;\n"+"\tmargin: 0;\n"+"\n"+"\tbackground: #eeeeee;\n"+"\tborder: 1px solid DarkGray;\n"+"}\n"+"\n"+".intelliTaggerSuggestions .currentTag   {\n"+"\tfont-weight: bold;\n"+"}\n"+"\n"+".intelliTaggerSuggestions .suggestionNumber {\n"+"\tcolor: #808080;\n"+"}\n"+"\n"+".intelliTaggerSuggestions .numberedSuggestion{\n"+"\twhite-space: nowrap;\n"+"}\n"+"\n"+".intelliTaggerSuggestions .intelliTaggerFooter {\n"+"\tmargin-top: 4px;\n"+"\tborder-top-width: thin;\n"+"\tborder-top-style: solid;\n"+"\tborder-top-color: #999999;\n"+"}\n"+".intelliTaggerSuggestions .favorites {\n"+"\tborder-bottom-width: thin;\n"+"\tborder-bottom-style: solid;\n"+"\tborder-bottom-color: #999999;\n"+"\tpadding-bottom: 2px;\n"+"}\n"+"\n"+".intelliTaggerSuggestions .normalTags {\n"+"\tpadding-top: 2px;\n"+"}\n"+"\n"+".intelliTaggerSuggestions .intelliTaggerFooter .button {\n"+"\tfont-size: 10px;\n"+"\n"+"\tpadding-left: 0.3em;\n"+"\tpadding-right: 0.3em;\n"+"}\n"+"\n"+"/*}}}*/\n";config.shadowTiddlers["IntelliTaggerMainTemplate"]="<!--\n"+"{{{\n"+"-->\n"+"<div class=\"favorites\" macro=\"intelliTagger action: showFavorites\"></div>\n"+"<div class=\"normalTags\" macro=\"intelliTagger action: showTags\"></div>\n"+"<!-- The Footer (with the Navigation) ============================================ -->\n"+"<table class=\"intelliTaggerFooter\" border=\"0\" width=\"100%\" cellspacing=\"0\" cellpadding=\"0\"><tbody>\n"+"  <tr>\n"+"\t<td align=\"left\">\n"+"\t\t<span macro=\"intelliTagger action: closeButton\"></span>\n"+"\t</td>\n"+"\t<td align=\"right\">\n"+"\t\t<span macro=\"intelliTagger action: version\"></span>, <span macro=\"intelliTagger action: copyright \"></span>\n"+"\t</td>\n"+"  </tr>\n"+"</tbody></table>\n"+"<!--\n"+"}}}\n"+"-->\n";config.shadowTiddlers["IntelliTaggerEditTagsTemplate"]="<!--\n"+"{{{\n"+"-->\n"+"<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar +saveTiddler -cancelTiddler'></div>\n"+"<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>\n"+"<div class='tagged' macro='tags'></div>\n"+"<div class='viewer' macro='view text wikified'></div>\n"+"<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar +saveTiddler -cancelTiddler'></div>\n"+"<div class='editor' macro='edit tags'></div><div class='editorFooter'><span macro='message views.editor.tagPrompt'></span><span macro='tagChooser'></span></div>\n"+"<!--\n"+"}}}\n"+"-->\n";config.shadowTiddlers["BSD open source license (abego Software)"]="See [[Licence|http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/#%5B%5BBSD%20open%20source%20license%5D%5D]].";config.shadowTiddlers["IntelliTaggerPlugin Documentation"]="[[Documentation on abego Software website|http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/doc/IntelliTagger.pdf]].";config.shadowTiddlers["IntelliTaggerPlugin SourceCode"]="[[Plugin source code on abego Software website|http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/archive/IntelliTaggerPlugin/Plugin-IntelliTagger-src.1.0.2.js]]\n";(function(){var _126=restart;restart=function(){setStylesheet(store.getTiddlerText("IntelliTaggerStyleSheet"),"IntelliTaggerStyleSheet");_126.apply(this,arguments);};})();}
// %/
Montgomery, L. E. (2001). //'Kali's follies: Midlife at the Millennium'. Theatre as depth psychology praxis//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2001). (Publication No. AAT [[3029743|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726045161&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This dissertation consists of the artistic creation of a one-woman theatrical performance entitled "Kali's Follies: Midlife at the Millennium." The performance comically dramatizes attitudes, trends, and dominant Western cultural projections towards women in menopause framed against the backdrop of apocalyptic "millennial madness." The literature review surveys the medicalization of menopause, its dissociative and liminal aspects, how menopausal and the millennial processes inform and mirror each other, the parallels between the colonization of the body of woman and body of earth, and women's writing as a liberating and decolonizing force. The artistic methodology as depth psychology praxis is explored in depth from a variety of perspectives, including the creative calling, the dialogic nature of psyche, the artist and the wounded body, the mythic origins of the actor and theatre, the tradition of women and comedy, and the artistic gift. The script for the performance as well as a scene-by-scene analysis demonstrates the integration of psychological gnosis, historical trends, cultural critique, and a personal journey of individuation. Concluding reflections concern the menopausal woman's voice, confrontation with death and aging, initiatory encounters with the Dark Goddess, and the performance within the context of the feminist movement and global issues.
<<<
Perluss, B. (2004). //Landscape Archetypes: Islands, Valleys, Mountains, and Deserts//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. AAT [[3155818|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=828435921&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
Delving into Gary Snyder's (1995) inquiry, "How does knowledge of place help us know the Self?" (p.189), this study explores the relationship between psyche and landscape, and how this relationship expresses itself through archetypal symbols manifested in island, valley, mountain, and desert landscapes. Given that the study of psyche and landscape is comparable to the alchemical work with spirit and matter, I also demonstrate that a living psychological relationship to landscape is an alchemical one in which both the observer and the landscape are transformed.

This study lingers in the spaces between&mdash;between psyche and landscape, spirit and matter, inner and outer. Hermeneutics lends the tools to navigate through the uncertainties of these intermediate spaces and to that "mysterious point of contact" (von Franz, 1974, p. 236) where landscape becomes dream and psyche regains her footing on terra firma. It is here that one rediscovers the primordial, regenerative, and reciprocal bond between psyche and landscape.

My procedure has been threefold: spending considerable time in natural landscapes and observing the symbolic imagery that emerges during this time; comparing literature from various genres including depth psychology, mythology, poetry and nature writing, and finally, engaging in the difficult task of putting my findings into a living language that bequeaths voice and breath to both psyche and landscape.

What I discovered is that the conversation between psyche and landscape is a dynamic one that takes place largely on an unconscious level. Here the distinction between inner and outer becomes blurred, influenced by unconscious projections, which leads to confusion between the observer and that which is observed. The difficult task of the writer is to initiate the alchemical operation of separatio &mdash;the separation&mdash;which entails sorting through the chaos and making sense of it, and then putting this new insight into words and thus bringing it into consciousness.

Ultimately, this study reveals that personal and ecological healing comes about by redeeming our inherent connection to landscape, and by recognizing that the archetype of individuation is deeply rooted in Earth. In doing so, we become active participants in creation, co-creators, engaging the world fully and consciously.
<<<
/***
|''Name:''|LegacyStrikeThroughPlugin|
|''Description:''|Support for legacy (pre 2.1) strike through formatting|
|''Version:''|1.0.2|
|''Date:''|Jul 21, 2006|
|''Source:''|http://www.tiddlywiki.com/#LegacyStrikeThroughPlugin|
|''Author:''|MartinBudden (mjbudden (at) gmail (dot) com)|
|''License:''|[[BSD open source license]]|
|''CoreVersion:''|2.1.0|
***/

//{{{
// Ensure that the LegacyStrikeThrough Plugin is only installed once.
if(!version.extensions.LegacyStrikeThroughPlugin) {
version.extensions.LegacyStrikeThroughPlugin = {installed:true};

config.formatters.push(
{
	name: "legacyStrikeByChar",
	match: "==",
	termRegExp: /(==)/mg,
	element: "strike",
	handler: config.formatterHelpers.createElementAndWikify
});

} //# end of "install only once"
//}}}
Feijoo, M. (2006). //Listening to our children's voices: Abandonment, invisibility, and resilience in the lives of high poverty Hispanic drop outs//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3250884|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1276394431&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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The purpose of this study was to examine the gap between students' perceptions about their teachers' practices, attitudes, and perspectives, and practices that students feel promote their success or failure in school. Accordingly, the goal of this study is to examine the learning experiences and perspectives of students in high-poverty, high-minority, and low-performing schools. Qualitative methods in combination with participatory action research and critical hermeneutics will provide a rich and complementary way in which to generate, analyze, and report data. Three interviews were conducted with each study participant. In addition, the study generated a set of student recommendations that address the themes and issues that resulted from the study.
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Williams (2003). Looking for Meaning in All the Wrong Places: A Depth Psychological Perspective on the Relationship Between Human Genome Science and the Human Psyche. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3137281| http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=766270591&sid=7&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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Since the time when the daring but doomed Prometheus stole from the gods the technology of fire, the evolution of human consciousness, and the relentless development of scientific discovery and technological innovation have marched hand-in-hand along the continuum of history. New technologies have historically emerged in response to both conscious and unconscious need: to affect the supply of basic human necessities, to realize humankind's dreams, or to satiate the uniquely human desire to master the unmastered and know the unknown. Yet, whether born of necessity, hope, or desire, scientific discovery and technological innovation are all manifestations of the human imagination and fantasy.

Recently, a new, powerful technology has appeared that promises the ability to harness the awesome powers of primitive cells to grow, develop, and differentiate in forms and patterns that are of human design. The power to create and design human life, once the exclusive domain of the gods, has now too been stolen and gifted to humankind in the form of genome science and technologies. This new power has placed humankind in a critical position that has profound sociological, theological, and psychological implications from a depth psychological perspective and, in doing so, gain insight and understanding regarding the relationship between genome science and the psyche.

Using a hermeneutic model, psychological and non psychological literature, film, myth, and story are brought into a dialogue that reveals the conscious fantasies and the unconscious projections that are constellated in the psyche by the promise of human participation in the divine act of creating, designing, and determining the nature of human life. Ultimately, this study concludes that an authentic experience of our individual uniqueness cannot be scientifically created or designed. Rather, it requires a genuine encounter with the unconscious. The powers that genome research holds forth seduce one into believing that the longings of the soul can be satisfied with the techniques of science. The realization of one's true, unique being, however, is a psychological process, not a scientific achievement. Science is not a suitable surrogate for the wisdom of the psyche.
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Brooks, A. H. (2007). //Lure of desolate places//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2007). (Publication No. [[AAT 3281482|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1404343591&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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Desolate places hold a mysterious lure containing both fascination and fear. There is a magnetic nature of place that often arouses our curiosity and entices us to venture into unknown physical and psychological territory. Place surrounds us. It has witnessed the evolving activity of the human species. Desolate places provide a landscape for us to explore a deeper silence not easily found in the hustle of our modern world. Land, being present longer than most species on this planet, holds memories and footprints that contain secrets. The purpose of this study is to discover ways to listen into desolate place, and to provide opportunities for the wisdom of the land to be heard. Through the use of five different lenses, an exploration into dialogue with the creative force of psyche makes available what I regard as innate, though often overlooked, knowledge embedded in the natural environment. By overtly engaging the connection that exists throughout the animate and inanimate world, we can experience an increase in feelings of respect, connection, and well-being. This is a journey toward health for ourselves and for the planet. With a larger perspective on our place in this world, we begin to feel a love for and responsibility to the land, and to all of its inhabitants. This theoretical study uses a hermeneutic phenomenology method with organic inquiry to explore the different ways to seek the intelligence inherent in a desolate landscape. Through mythopoetic language, a creative spiral engages historical data, stories, ancestral markers, movement, film, poetry, and dreams. Meaning emerges as the interfaces between human and place are infused with the imaginal realm. As this engagement with desolate places brings forth a deeper understanding of the human-place relationship, the silenced voices find an audience. Having a sense of our place in this universe surfaces an appreciation of self and others, and a connection to the sacred. There appears to be value in the presence of quietude and barren desolation. The awe, the re-enlivening of all things, and the power of being witnessed suggests that the future vigor of our species would benefit from submerging into these landscapes.
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Shealy, P. (2003). //Military brats/third culture kids: A phenomenological study of the effects of being raised in the military//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3084882|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765392981&sid=8&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The military is a large, complex organization established for the purpose of training soldiers in the best and most effective ways to protect, fight, and defend our nation, even to death. That is to say, men and women are trained in the practice of violence. Inside the larger military structure grows the less visible subculture of military spouses and children. Children of military parents are often referred to as Military brats, Army brats, Air Force brats and other derivations specific to particular branches of service. How are children affected by the lived experience of growing up inside a veritable war machine? How does the shadow of violence translate into their adult psyches and souls?

Heuristic and phenomenological research methodology was used to explore the quality and lived experiences of a small study group comprised of five men and five women. Dialogic interviews were recorded and transcribed. The interview candidates received a copy of their interview and were invited to comment on, change, modify, or clarify any part of their personal story. From multiple interviews and personal experience, I have identified 11 themes common to the military brats with whom I spoke.

The common military brat themes are as follows: (1) rootlessness and a sense of not belonging exemplified by the Greek god Hermes, god of borders, boundaries, and the journey; (2) aloneness, loneliness, and a sense of detachment and difference from the civilian collective, exemplified by the archetype of the Orphan; alone but special; (3) military dependents, traps and bonds; (4) identification with and reenactment of the warrior hero's attitudes and behaviors; (5) citizens of the world, cultural diversity and tolerance; (6) drug and alcohol abuse; (7) depression, anger and rage; (8) sexual promiscuity; (9) difficulties with commitment; come here; go away; (10) a conflicted inner sense of self; and (11) archetypal shadow defenses and self care systems.
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Lloyd, R. (2004). //Mystica Communitas Toward a Gnostic Psychology of Individuation//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. AAT [[3128812|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765942171&sid=5&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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Using an original adaptation of a dialogical hermeneutic, called the //Gnostic method of research// , the study explores the archetypal roots of Jung's theory of individuation in ancient Gnostic myths and practices. Because the Gnostic method recognizes the need for the soul to return to its own spiritual origins before it can discover the truth of events, ideas, and written texts, the study includes descriptions of imaginal experiences and subjective associations to complement the theoretical analysis of gnosis and individuation.

The thesis argues that Gnostics achieved their gnosis by personal experience of the autonomous, archetypal realms of the psyche and articulated their numinous encounters in mythic symbols. Gnostic myths point to a developmental progression inherent in the individuation process expressed here as the conception, gestation, and birth of the Self. With the correct attitude of an initiated ego assisting the process, the developmental progression of the Self is viewed to move from latency to manifestation to realization.

This dissertation extends Jung's idea of the developmental unfolding of the Self to include a Gnostic vision of the realization of the spiritual individuality of the human being. The "birth" of the manifest Self is perceived to be the end of strictly sense-based ego consciousness and the beginning of a life of gnosis as a source of perception and valuation. The thesis argues that under the proper circumstances, the Self may continue its development and realize its full potential as the union of the twin spirit above (outside time and space) and the unified complex of body, soul, and spirit in the time-space, physical world. Several Gnostic symbols and themes convey the idea that during the individuation process, the many uncooperative parts of the personality are gradually convinced by the celestial spirit to cooperate with the image of wholeness which the human being was born to achieve. During the Self's realization, the beings of the collective and personal unconscious find a communitas around a central image of wholeness. As such, the culmination of individuation is imagined to be a mystica communitas .
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Oxford, T. (2004). //Non-ordinary experiences of ordinary women: initiation and individuation on the medicine path//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. AAT [[3187925|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=990277211&sid=6&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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Drawing on personal experience and grounded in a theoretical understanding that is derived from depth psychology, my research asks the question: What is the lived experience of the modern nonindigenous medicine woman? Within this context, I explore the lives of five women who have adopted and adapted traditional and indigenous spiritual paths that have, at their core, the ritual sacramental ingestion of entheogenic (often hallucinogenic) plants. Within these traditions, plant medicines, such as the iboga of Africa, the ayahuasca of South America, and the peyote of the Southwest are considered to have divine powers and have been used extensively throughout history as agents of healing&mdash;physically, emotionally, psychologically, and spiritually. These are embodiment traditions in which the Divine is incarnated by way of eating "the flesh of God", modern paths that derive from an ancient, alchemical approach to literally, not metaphorically, bringing spirit into matter.

Jung reminds us that the "purpose" of human existence is the sacred task of serving psyche. Meaning may be gained by offering one's "life in service of this process. Such an individual offers himself as a vessel for the incarnation of deity and thereby promotes the on-going transformation of God by giving Him human manifestation" (Edinger, 1984, p. 113).

This research demonstrates that the medicine path can be the embodied expression of this cognitive concept. The experiences of these modern women, seen through a Jungian lens, allow us to understand an ancient way of initiation and awakening as a path of individuation.

Here, these "ordinary" women, sharing their "nonordinary" experiences, can be seen offering themselves as vessels on a voyage to the Beyond&mdash;that we may travel in their wake. In their willingness to traverse the astral realms, they alter our world, with loving intention. If, in our bias to a consensual reality that fails to comprehend "the reality of the psyche," we fail to fathom the mettle this takes, it does not minimize their task or their sacrifice. Willing to wrestle with God, they are engaged in soulmaking. They are living Jung's myth for a modern age: the incarnation of God in man.
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Mercury, M. (2000). //Pagan fleshworks: A depth psychological study of contemporary body modification//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2000). (Publication No. AAT [[3008489|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=728852901&sid=8&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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Body modifications are endemic to Western culture at this time in history. Tattoos, piercings, brandings, and implants are the modifications of choice for many people. The purpose of this work is twofold: to explain why this form of soul expression has captured the imaginations of Western people, and to aid those who seek such modifications in optimizing the experience so that it becomes a potentially transformational event.

One theory for explaining the proliferation of fleshworks is that with the demise of the mythology of Christianity in the popular imagination, the shadow elements of the psyche which are normally projected out onto the religious symbols of Christ (as all good) and Satan (as all bad), are now returned to the sender. The conflict generated by the imperative that one carry and integrate one's shadow encourages a sensate, bodily initiation through body modification.

Another theory examines body modification as a result of falsifying type. Using Jung's typologies and the work of Katherine Benziger on Passive Adaptive Stress Syndrome, it becomes clear that when people are required to function for most of their waking hours in areas of the brain that are not their natural lead function, they suffer fatigue, depression, and loss of self-esteem. Placement of a fleshwork can be analyzed based on which area of the brain needs to be stimulated in order to perform more efficiently.

Some seek body modification for extreme physical sensation. At the climaxing moment of needle insertion, they experience numinosity. The work of Michael Persinger explains how the perception of the numinous is a result of a disturbance in the brain's temporal lobe.

Neurological information notwithstanding, most people getting tattooed, pierced, branded, or implanted expect to cross a sensate threshold, and see the event as a rite of passage. To that end, alchemical stages of matter transmutation are discussed, along with the difference between greater or lesser coniunctio experiences.

Regardless of the conscious reason that people elect to modify their body, they are activating unconscious structures of the psyche. Tattoo images are archetypal by virtue of their resonance and charge. Piercings on the body activate chakra energy. As long as the bridge between ego and the unconscious remains closed, people will use body modification in a homeopathic attempt to open it.
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~Conlon-McIvor, M. (2004). //Paradox Found: Depth Memoir as Quantum Coniunctio//. 
(Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. [[AAT 3247244|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1253472681&sid=3&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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Within our modern worldview, we suffer a loss of the imaginal as psyche is rendered separate from matter, spirit from nature, memory from futurity. Our felt subjectivity thus is often interpreted as one-sided psychological projection rather than as psyche's eternal process of 'possibilizing.' As Avens observes, psyche longs for a 'participatory, materialization of felt subjectivity.' This is our birthright.

In paradox found, we enter the middle ground of "both/and," where the space between our epistemological splits is eradicated. C. G. Jung, long intrigued by the paradoxical play of psyche and matter, called for an eradication of opposites so that a radical third, the coniunctio, might emerge. Critical to this process is psyche's participatory materialization of felt subjectivity.

In this dissertation, I explore the emergence of the radical third and its requisite revisioning of what we call matter. This matter was once assumed to be "tangible," writes Jung, but with the eruption of the new sciences, we have learned matter is really "an hypothesis...a symbol for something unknown, which may just as well be 'spirit,' or...even God." I investigate matter within the prism of memory, not the Hallmark memory constrained by a linear, time-bound trajectory, but memory as restored to its original meaning: the constant abiding of an emotional essence of importance which transcends time.

I chose the artistic method, herein called the Depth Memoir. After constructing a thematic, theoretical hermeneutic analysis of the West's relationship to time, memory, and the imagination, I have written eight depth memoirs, each emerging from the fertile psychotextural sod of childhood, Bachelard's so-called first time, the archetypal significance of which places it outside of causal time.

I propose that Depth Memoir becomes a therapy of creation and a bridge between epistemological splits: memory, rooted in the imaginal, mirrors a psyche in which the observer and the observed are categorically fluid. Thus, Depth Memoir helps point the way to transcending the egoic, time-bound I and our one-sided grasping onto the world. Moving through this deep remembering, so we are moved, witnessing the sacred act of reverse transubstantiation. In Depth Memoir, flesh becomes word as the heart learns to speak its original language, once again, or perhaps, for the first time.
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Bogner, R. (2002). //Places: An exploration of physical environments and their influence on intrapsychic processes//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3060747|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=764703611&sid=3&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The earth's places have become interchangeable commodities: home and ancestral lands are easily abandoned and neglected. Western culture values mobility.

Archetypal psychology has resurrected the concept of the autonomy of matter&mdash;rocks, fields, rivers, and buildings&mdash;but the aliveness of the non-human world, and our environment's interaction with and effect on the individual psyche remains a secret in mainstream thinking. Places have found advocates in philosophy, phenomenology, mythology, poetry, and geomantic practices. This dissertation joins their contributions to an ensouled place-world with my own views and the experiences and insights of the participants in this filmed project. Aware as a former professional photographer of our time's visual proclivity, I have chosen film as my medium to convey the simple message to those who have forgotten; I am the place where I am.

Places: Dialogues with Land, Home, the Earth, a seventy minute film recorded in digital video, shows the interaction of seven participants with places that have meaning for them. For them, convent, tipi, Victorian mansion, rock plateau, open range, and labyrinth are not mere site or location. In their sheltering aliveness, these places are integral parts of the individual psyche. The varied ways of place depicted in this work invite readers and viewers to examine affinity with&mdash;or estrangement from&mdash;places in their own lives.

The process and act of engaging with our physical environments while being observed by a camera constellates complexes or evokes repressed memories in both the observer and the observed. Crew, camera, participant, and audience become immersed in alchemical work that hopes to transmute prevailing indifference into a conscious relationship with the earth's places.
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Pohn, K. R. (2006). //Playing the cosmic game: Exploring play's archetypal aspects through the kaleidoscope of culture//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3264654|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1328075121&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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This artistic dissertation uses a bricolage method combining hermeneutics, heuristics, van den Bergian phenomenology, and transit astrology to examine the archetypal aspects of play as a web site. The dissertation is an example of bricolage, and thus the method is indeed part of the message. The web site: [[www.cosmicplay.net|http://www.cosmicplay.net]], contains a series of depth psychological essays which explore cosmic play, or the Hindu notion of //lila//, through cosmology and mythology, chaos theory and depth psychology, and finds that this "Cosmic Game" is an ever-present and eternally returning pattern of death and rebirth. Grof's cartography of the psyche provides a map for the journey through the varied terrains that are explored, while pictures and conversations help to keep the dissertation playful. The web site also examines the "Cosmic Game" through the "Kaleidoscope of Culture" where three different cultural creations, //Chicago// (Marshall, 2002, motion picture), //Disneyland//, and //Mary Poppins// (Stevenson, 1964, motion picture) are explored, and different archetypal aspects of cosmic play are revealed. These cultural creations are considered against the backdrop of the time they were created and that they portray, and they also reflect the archetypal themes that were present in the cosmos at these different times, revealing the universal nature of these cosmic play patterns. In //Chicago//, the pitfalls and perils of play are considered, mirroring the ~Saturn-Pluto planetary archetypal complex. //Disneyland// shows the promise of play reflecting the ~Uranus-Neptune planetary archetypal complex, and //Mary Poppins// illuminates the transformative power of play, which characterizes the ~Uranus-Pluto planetary archetypal complex.
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Nelson, E. E. (2002). //Psyche's knife//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3029742|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726041351&sid=5&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The purpose of this dissertation is to take up a neglected image within the myth //Eros and Psyche//, the story Lucius Apuleius included in his 2^^nd^^-century Roman novel entitled //The Golden Ass// . That image is Psyche's knife.

For nearly two millennia, //Eros and Psyche// has captivated artists, writers, poets, and scholars of myth, religion, archaeology, and psychology as a story of the soul suffering on behalf of eros. At a pivotal moment in the narrative, Psyche commits the transgression that shapes the remainder of the myth. She confronts Eros with a lamp and knife, breaking the taboo against seeing the god. In the vast majority of literature that describes this moment, Psyche's lamp is remembered and Psyche's knife is forgotten. In this dissertation, I determine the knife's literal and symbolic role in the story and read //Eros and Psyche// as a separatio dream text&mdash;the alchemical process associated to knives.

To give this neglected image its due, I use amplification to enrich Psyche's knife, deepen the story, and foster a more complete understanding of Psyche and Eros. In attending to the clusters of images that organically associate themselves to Psyche's knife, this dissertation discovers new psychological insights into the journey of the soul. The first amplification, "The Sacrificial Knife," finds an ancestor to Psyche with her knife, the Great Goddess in Paleolithic, Neolithic, and Bronze Age archaeological artifacts who was known by her double-headed axe. The second amplification, "The Lunar Knife," associates Psyche's knife to the moon and views the knife as a lunar weapon symbolizing the rising power of the archetypal feminine. The third amplification, "The Phallic Knife," views Psyche's knife as a phallic image symbolizing the archetypally masculine urge to penetrate the beloved and an expression of Psyche's boldness in the pivotal moment.

This dissertation concludes that Psyche's knife symbolizes Jung's feeling function&mdash;the development of essential discrimination and judgment&mdash;that allows us to know our deepest values. It also concludes that //Eros and Psyche// dramatizes the sacred agon between love and the soul in which faithful lovers are also worthy adversaries and, when wholeness is called for, beloved enemies.
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Lin, J. (2003). Psychological Forces Impinging Upon American ~CEOs and their Relationship with Archetypes. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3147298|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=795908911&sid=4&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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America, the world's only superpower, is powerful because of its economic machine, driven by mature and emerging companies that are led by the superhero ~CEOs. Today these ~CEOs are seen as greedy, self-serving, and corrupt. How ~CEOs obtain their power and why it sometimes destroys them is the subject of this dissertation.

The method chosen to examine this subject is dialogical hermeneutic research. The researcher is an active CEO. This study scrutinizes the attachment of a CEO to the archetypal forces of the unconscious. It draws the conclusion that most ~CEOs obtain their power from a father complex, which is ultimately attached to the Zeus archetype. The research indicates that in today's global economy, the CEO's function is becoming more conflicted; and that, for those who choose to lead, an attachment such as Zeus may be even more necessary in the future.

To describe the background of the American CEO, mythology, particularly American myths, are reviewed. A possible scientific explanation of the archetype is considered. The paper also includes an evaluation of what power is and how it operates in American corporations. How ~CEOs move from an attachment to infant archetypes to the father archetype is also investigated.

The dissertation concludes, quite emphatically, that practically all entrepreneurs and most successful ~CEOs embody an attachment to the Zeus archetype. Further, since the archetype is bipolar under stressful circumstances, individuals may become possessed by its negative pole, which can destroy them and, sometimes, the companies they lead. Case studies from the researcher's past and from public figures are reflected upon.

The dissertation also concludes that the loss of belief in a deity is a major problem for America, its citizens, and its ~CEOs. The research finds that some ~CEOs maintain their religious beliefs and thereby preserve a balance with the Zeus propensity to use personal power destructively. A possible solution for the nonreligious ~CEOs would be to become acquainted with Jungian psychology and move toward the arduous process of individuation.
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Nishino, S. F. (2005). //Rasputin: A psychobiography//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2005). (Publication No. [[AAT 3173605|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=913541441&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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The primary focus of this study was to answer the methodological question: What are the primary components of a psychobiography of Rasputin, using a depth psychological emphasis? Sub-questions were: (1)&nbsp;What was the personal psychology of Rasputin? (2)&nbsp;How did the personality of Rasputin interact and interface with other personalities in his interpersonal relationships? (3)&nbsp;How did history, culture, environment, religion and the collective unconscious influence the life and times of Rasputin? Using the hermeneutical method combined with a case history approach, biographical, historical, philosophical, and religious sources were examined to establish a general framework of meaning in regard to the personal and collective psychological milieu surrounding the life and times of the subject. Personal, interpersonal, environmental, historical, cultural, religious, archetypal, and imaginal influences were identified and discussed. This study revealed that the fates of Rasputin, the Russian Imperial Family, and the Russian collective were inextricably intertwined in an epic story of conscious and unconscious psychological forces of history that move beyond the microcosm of individual psychology to approach the macrocosm of the universal collective.
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Nelsen, M. J. (2004). //Re-membering the Soul Through the Senses: Meditations, Reflections, and Reveries on The Lady and the Unicorn Tapestry//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. AAT [[3137279|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=766270581&sid=3&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The mythic theme of heroic ascent that has dominated Western culture across time cries out for somatic grounding. This is as true today as it was 500 years ago when //The Lady and the Unicorn// tapestry was first conceived of and created. Traditionally interpreted as an allegory of the senses (touch, sight, smell, hearing, and taste), the tapestry's six panels carry archetypal dimensions in their imagery, suggesting the impetus toward incarnation and alchemical transformation. The Lady , symbolically associated with the soul's wisdom, can be understood as the reconciling agent in the ancient split between body and spirit. In this work, I have emphasized the feminine symbolism of body, soul, and the entire material world, based upon a long tradition within mythology and theology of equating these realms with the feminine body-vessel.

The circular room at the Cluny Museum in Paris, home to //The Lady and the Unicorn// tapestry, suggested my thematic hermeneutic method. This approach was facilitated through an empathic engagement with my subject, and a strong heuristic element that emphasized self in the work through the inclusion of dreams, artwork, journaling, active imagination, and reveries. By following the archetypal rhythms of the individuation process through each of tapestry's six panels, I attempt to reveal the indivisibility of self and culture in the larger evolutionary adventure. Synchronistic events, emerging out of the meeting between the historical past and present, directed the course of this study over time.

Major findings of the study include the need for somatic grounding in both depth psychology and history as a way of engendering individual and collective transformation. Re-situating psychology in art was found to be a powerful co-determinant in this process. The dynamic interaction between the dissertation process, the thematic material, my personal journey of individuation, and the autonomous quality of language, was acknowledged as a co-creative element of this work.
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Ward, T. J. (2003). Reawakening Indigenous Sensibilities in the Western Psyche. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3144564| http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=790232021&sid=3&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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Indigenous peoples not exposed to the civilizing processes of the West maintained access to modes of perception and sensing capabilities that kept them in a flow of intelligible communication with the nonhuman as well as the human world. Modern persons have allowed these innate capacities to atrophy. The result is an overvaluing of the human and a forgetting of the delicate inter-dependence of the earth community. This has effected a tragic loss of health, balance, and harmony ecologically, psychologically, emotionally, and spiritually.

As humans, we are inherently endowed with these indigenous sensibilities. Though dormant, they can be recovered. The endeavor, however, requires a strong commitment to the processes such an awakening initiates.

This dissertation is a heuristic and hermeneutic description of my own journey as the indigenous dimension of my psyche began to revive. I discovered that the ways in which Westerners have regarded and treated indigenous peoples the world over&mdash;the unapologetic conquest, disrespect, violence, oppression, and marginalization&mdash;are exactly how we have tacitly been trained to treat the indigenous aspects of our own natures. To recover respect and a voice for the indigenous mind is to go against fierce internal and external structures built specifically to disavow and exclude these ways of knowing and being.

My contention is that this work has become imperative for Westerners if we are to regain ecological and internal equilibrium. The split from our own natural selves has caused us to become destructive to ourselves, each other, and the natural world&mdash;for the most part unwittingly, without evil intent, not realizing the consequences of styles of thinking and living unquestioningly pursued. The inertia is hard to interrupt, yet a radical reversal is required. In my case, the reversal was violent, devastating, and unwelcome until I began to grasp the importance and meaning of what was happening and why. My hope is that if these meanings can be communicated and understood, other persons may be able consciously and creatively to bring about changes that will assist individuals and thereby the larger culture and our planet in necessary recovery and reawakening of the indigenous mind.
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Davidson (2001). //Reclaiming rites of a passage through ritual: Soulwork for midlife women//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2001). (Publication No. AAT [[3029747|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726041381&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]
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The purpose of this dissertation, utilizing a phenomenological and heuristic approach, was to explore the essential nature of the experience of six midlife women (ages 45-57) when they enacted ritual to remember and commemorate life milestones. This research emerged from awareness that crucial periods of feminine psycho-biological transitions are given little acknowledgment in present-day culture.

The literature review offers a broad exposition of themes involved in the practice of ritual linked to rites of passage. Perspectives from depth and archetypal psychology, ethnology, and alchemy, with consideration of sacred and soulmaking aspects of ritual are presented. The deleterious effects of the absence of initiatory rites and the concept of the initiatory wound is explored. Areas of women's concerns are presented with special focus on the image of the medial woman from the work of Wolff.

The experiential aspect of the study consists of three phases addressing areas pertaining to the women's remembrances of transition periods of adolescence, adulthood, and midlife. In phase 1, the women as co-researchers were individually interviewed by means of audiotape and asked to reflect back to the physical/emotional markers and defining moments of major life transitions. The women then came together as a group to plan, devise, and enact ritual to recognize each of the life passages. In the last phase of the research through audiotaped interviews, the women described the impact and effects of honoring their life transitions as seen through the lens of ritual. During the study, the researcher actively participated as documentor, facilitator, and co-researcher.

The findings provide glimpses into amplification of archetypal motifs, deep soulwork, and attitudinal shifts experienced by co-researchers. Several meaningful themes emerged during the ritual process, including: authenticity of intention, relatedness within the group, the security of sacred space, engagement in soulwork , psychic healing, integration , and personal validation . The final consensus of the co-researchers was that the practice of ritual opened up a potent process to put their lives in context by offering imaginal and soulful ways of looking into the significance of life passages.
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Ayres, J. (2005). //Research as Fictional Act: Poetry, Method and Metaphor//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2005). (Publication No. [[AAT 3205591|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1095422971&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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This theoretical dissertation enters into a dialogue with the research process as a creative, fictional act. Without grasping for a particular reality, without asking for things to become all too "clear" (the error of taking research literally), we ask what are the poetics of research, fictionalized into being? Martin Heidegger (Macquarrie & Robinson, 1962) assists in framing the spirit of this work with this passage from Plato's //Sophist//:

For manifestly you have long been aware of what you mean when you use the expression " being ". We, however, who used to think we understood it have now become perplexed (<html><i>&eta;&pi;&omicron;&rho;&eta;&kappa;&alpha;&mu;&epsilon;&nu;</i></html>). ( //Sophist// , 244a) (p. 19)

The manifest security of what is known and seen moves toward what is obscure and unseen. The manifest security of interpretation and research moves toward, and embraces, what is obscure and unseen. With each step one ventures away from the security of the literal mind, the mind that clings in attachment, into what resists any embrace. Indeed, what is obscure and unseen is Hades ( a-wides ), the unseen place. So consciousness descends into darkness, into Hell, lacking a vision, pure immobility. Research is descent ; it descends precisely where movement becomes impossible in the conscious realm.

This dissertation explores movement and immobility, movement through immobility, movement with immobility. As dance involves movement, one's ability to dance will be the struggle of research to overcome itself. Research in this dissertation will be a dance of descent into a version of Hell.It explores the descent into visions of utter immobility and "stuckness," and then attempts to render, poetically, the movement within Hell. As such this project attempts to liberate the enchained subjects of hell, to enunciate their cry of grief, their singular howls of execration, to give voice to the unique stuckness of the images at the bottom of a dry well. The question then arises: How do they enter the dance?
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Villarreal, S. (2004). Reshaping Cultural Identities: A Phenomenological Study of Eight Borderland Latinas. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. AAT [[3166385|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=885711391&sid=5&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The phenomenon of border embraces numerous sensibilities. From a cultural stance, border space represents the margins, the place at the edge that by its very nature attracts duality, fluctuation, and change. Borderlands are places that separate this side and the other side , yet also invite possibilities for new gestations in middle space. At a symbolic level, border space represents a place where death and rebirth coexist, where identities are transformed and reshaped. This work examined two areas: (1) the phenomenon of border in the context of lived space and time; (2) the evolution of salient Mexican feminine figures, including Our Lady of Guadalupe, La Malinche, La Llorona, and La Curandera, from an historical and archetypal stance, exploring how these mythological and cultural images have been important to and influenced the modern-day Latina.

This study applied heuristic and phenomenological methods to explore and examine borderland phenomena looking at the ~Texas-Mexico border from cultural, psychosocial, and depth psychological perspectives. Eight second-generation borderland Latinas were interviewed for this study, which then led to a holistic and thematic interpretation of their borderland experiences. A creative summation attempts to capture the essence of the study through poems, odes, invocations, and photographs that reflect the borderland experience individually and collectively. The body of literature included works devoted to the study of border feminine figures, scholarly material that examines current social theories related to the borderland phenomena, and literary works that support the creative piece of the dissertation. The works of Jung, Hillman, Freud, as well as various post-Jungian authors, feature prominently in the analysis and discussion of the findings.

The study concludes that honoring border experiences and archetypal images through aesthetic expression contributes to the reshaping of cultural identities in a way that provides a deeper understanding of border as sacred space&mdash;a place where soul resides, where ruptures occur, where shadow elements abide, and where keen observers of the borderlands through their creative wisdom and knowledge emerge as socio-cultural poets or //illuminadoras// to give voice to and transform borderland culture.
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Tysinger, B. C. (2006). //Return to Narcissus//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3264673|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1328075061&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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The myth of Narcissus has been told and retold for over two thousand years. This theoretical dissertation returns to the myth as written by Ovid in the //Metamorphoses// with the vulnerable eyes and subtle ways of knowing associated with depth psychology. Using a hermeneutic approach and engaging an orientation through the feminine, this dissertation challenges dualistic constructions of reality and explores ways in which self and other can be imagined. Valuing historical and esthetic consciousness, this dissertation follows how consciousness in the West has evolved and suggests alternate ways of understanding. As a mythic personage who escapes any attempt at specific interpretation or definition, Narcissus inspires theories about his personality, his life between the humans and the gods, and his ultimate fate when he sees his own image reflected. Literature researched in this dissertation encompasses how themes and images from the myth have appeared in works of literature and art, variations of the myth, the impact of narcissism as a personality disorder as well as a creative function of the psyche, the relationship of narcissism and culture, philosophical and gender issues related to the myth, and the ultimate significance of the reflection of the self. This dissertation explores the characters and actions of the myth beyond the linear, literal story in an effort to uncover the more complex interrelatedness of themes. The water and landscape of the myth are connected to feminine themes, how water can be imagined as an esthetic and psychological substance, and the concept of the anima mundi. The convoluted ideas around the theme of the double are used to provide insight into the duality and duplicity of psychic life. Following Narcissus to the underworld opens a soul perspective and the importance of embodied consciousness. This dissertation remembers Narcissus through dreams, alchemy, and the archetypal world to bring the myth into modern psychological perspectives. Ultimately it establishes how the myth invites psyche to recall and return to elements of psychic life that connect human consciousness to the natural world and life itself.
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Jaeggi, L. (2004). //Revisiting a Home For the Heart: Bruno Bettelheim, the Orthogenic School and the Future of Milieu in Child Treatment.// (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. [[AAT 3155826|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=828443651&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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Based upon personal experience as a milieu therapist at the Orthogenic School in the 1990s as well as upon work in other residential treatment institutions, the author is taking a new look at Bruno Bettelheim's theory and practice of milieu psychotherapy. The intention is to make it available to those working with children and adolescents suffering from severe emotional disturbances and mental illness.

This study builds a foundation for milieu psychotherapy informed by depth psychology-integrating findings from contemporary research with traditional perspectives such as interpersonal neurobiology, infant research, trauma studies, attachment theory, and psychoanalysis. All of these point to the centrality of relationship, emotions, and the unconscious in both normal development and the healing process.

Through essays that speak to the heart, the author continues Bettelheim's tradition of a poetic prose that is evocative, provocative and engaging so that the reader can participate in the journey to liberate the therapeutic milieu from the grip of behavior management, returning it to a place where common humanity, empathy, and healing is central.
Graham, V. B. (2006). //Sandwerk as an Individual Spiritual Practice//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3238859|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1251828951&sid=5&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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How can psychospiritual experiences result from a new form of sandplay, a method of applied Jungian psychology introduced by Kalff in 1980? Sandplay is a therapist-assisted use of miniatures in a sandtray, a nonrational, preverbal, sensate method for self-exploration and healing.

This dissertation explores and documents the phenomenon of an individual's creating three intentional sandtrays in solitude and reflecting on them. I have coined a new term, //sandwerk//, describing a way one can practice this adaptation of sandplay for personal growth.

Sandwerk offers a process for recognizing and assimilating some contents of the unconscious. One provides one's own free, protected space for creativity and relating to imaginal figures, and explores symbols that personify archetypal patterns of energy. This experience, as a transformative practice, offers the potential to integrate the unconscious into waking life and develop a stronger personality during the second half of life.

Art therapy, drawing mandalas, and dreamwork employ similar visual projective techniques.

This dissertation uses phenomenological research methodology by gathering data from a small sample of six therapists and spiritual directors, aged 49-70. Each co-researcher focused on a subjective question and created three sandtrays within one week. They discussed their individual introductory rituals and experiences of the process. I distilled the interviews after making my own sandwerks.

Some results of the study were unexpected. Participants expressed a range of feelings: surprise, fear, love, despair, wholeness, and fascination. They reported discovering meaning, respect, awe for the process, and further questions. On various levels, co-researchers were able to contain conflict assisted by experiencing the images. They extended their insights and transformed, assimilating contents of the unconscious. Their relationships with imaginal figures deepened their sense of the symbolic, and mediated inner and outer life.

This research finds that sandwerk&mdash;an individual practice for personal development that is intentional, serial, imaginal, and relational&mdash;offers a method, a process, and a potential for integrating unconscious dynamics into awareness. It facilitates individuation, a Jungian term for becoming one's authentic whole self in relationship to a transpersonal power. Moreover, sandwerk can liberate Jung's depth psychology and Kalff's sandplay from the consulting room.
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Smethers, J. (2003). Scumbag Sewer Rats: The Criminalized Male Drug Addict And The Trickster Archetype. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3119793|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765346361&sid=9&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The general public, the mental health profession, the American judicial system, and criminalized male drug addicts themselves are struck with a social paradigmatic attitude toward criminalized male drug addicts that characterizes them as dirty, rotten, scumbag sewer rats.

This attitude, which others have toward them and which they have about themselves causes a self-fulfilling prophecy of aberrant behavior that keeps them isolated from the general public. As long as their dysfunctional behavior is scrutinized and labeled in this way, most addicts will continue to remain in a marginalized sector of society with little motivation to join the ranks of the general public.

To complicate matters, most criminalized male addicts who do recover retain many of the qualities that have placed them into this category in the first place, and many of those qualities are redemptive if they apply them to the betterment of mankind.

Motivated by spending more than 30 years as a member of this population, I have asked how I might inspire myself and others of my ilk to view themselves not as degenerates, but as worthy and productive people who have been directing the proclivities of the trickster archetype in the wrong direction.

To approach this phenomenon, I have chosen a phenomenological/artistic methodology: phenomenological in that I analyze data gleaned from interviews with drug addicts, and artistic in that I elucidate the lived experiences of criminalized male drug addicts in a series of stories about the fictional figure of Harry Scumbag.

Through these stories, I have elucidated the trickster archetype in drug addicts both in the stories themselves and in the act of story-telling, for in telling these stories, I, too, continue my own trickster ways creating works that are confabulation, partly factual and partly fictional. In the process, the redemptive possibilities in the trickster archetype emerge.
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~McEntire, S. D. (2005). //Silence: A depth psychological exploration//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2005). (Publication No. [[AAT 3247250|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1253473041&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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Silence has a story to be told. Silence fills the empty spaces in our hearts, the room, and our world. Silence questions. She stirs the imagination. Silence called to me to tell her story. Wondering what is to be learned about silence from a depth psychological perspective, I embarked on a long journey to discover what silence has to teach us about tending the soul of the world. Silence became my companion, informer, and co-creator, all the while maintaining an element of the mysterious and the ineffable. Finding that no one method was sufficient for the complete development of this elusive topic to be fully developed with integrity, it became clear that a hybrid methodology was necessary. The method developed into a theoretical research in the hermeneutic tradition combined with an autoethnographic heuristic voice infused with a mythopoetic/imaginal process. The amalgamation created an alchemical hermeneutics, "a hermeneutics of the depths, a hermeneutics with soul in mind" (Romanyshyn & Goodchild, 2003, p. 3). Alchemical hermeneutics honors the "mundus imaginalis" and the researcher's inescapable participation along with the rigors of scholarship and theoretical research. The exploration of silence embraced contemporary expressions of silence in creativity&mdash;music, art, literature, poetry, and film. The lost voices of the natural environment, women, the oppressed, and gods and goddesses of mythology asked to be heard and recognized. Studies of contemplative silence illuminated pathways to soulful awareness. However, silence refused to be compartmentalized or reduced to a series of definitions. Of primary interest to depth psychology is the relationship of silence to soul. Silence becomes the womb, the alchemical vessel, containing the universal archetypal elements of masculine and feminine energies, mythology, technology, science, creativity, intelligence, imagination, instinct, body, emotions, nature, and every imaginable facet of existence. As the contents of the vessel are filtered through the heart, a new vision emerges. Soul, which is beyond the realm of ego and the realm of distinction and separation, is a manifestation of silence. Therefore with loving awareness and wisdom grounded in silence, depth psychology provides an opportunity to tend the soul of the world.
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Avakian, P. D. (2006). //"Sister fire": Witnessing Armenian women's journey through dance//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3250886|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1273105981&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
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Hidden deep within the psychological and spiritual world of diasporan Armenian culture live the stories of forgotten life journeys. Armenian women's courageous footsteps led them through trauma, exile, and relocation. Their silenced voices, fragmented psyches, and erased histories contributed to broader cultural memory of loss. Rooted in ancient Near Eastern tradition, their resilient footprints became impressed in narratives of cultural dance tradition. Perhaps my love and experience of Armenian dance include the collective stories and footprints of Sister Fire, an ancient Armenian spiritual transformative tradition referenced by Carl Jung. The purpose of this dissertation is to see psyche's story in relation to cultural dance-to witness the meaning of the experiences of ancient Armenian dance in diasporan Armenian women's lives. Literature of Armenian studies, anthropology, Jungian psychology, and psychologies of liberation dialogue in relation to dance in this multidisciplinary phenomenological study. Feminist, post-modern, indigenous, and decolonizing approaches deepen the research methodologies. Inspired by traditions of depth psychology and psychologies of liberation, I impart a multifaceted methodological research process for narrative presentation which intertwines heuristics research, witnessing, dialogical interviews, thematic analysis, dream analysis, narrative analysis, and in-depth interpretive analysis. Personal and communal narratives emerge from the interpretation of life stories of sixteen multi-generational Armenian women of the international Antranig Dance Ensemble. This dissertation uncovers five significant psychological meaning systems which inform the dancers' life stories: tradition (sacrifice and love), individuation (sacred place and self-discovery), reclamation (mercy and longing), expression (feminine essence and voice), and social action (freedom and activism). With footprints on the stage as ink impressed upon the pages of narratives, these dancers' stories belong to history. This dissertation concludes the necessity for depth psychology to recognize the healing and individuating values of cultural dance in ensemble. Sister Fire, a collective dance expression of new life, integrates and liberates the diasporan psyche in a circle of love.
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Depth Psychology Dissertations
Poulsen, A. (2003). //Soul Dancing: Individuation within Intimacy//.(Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3155826|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765213641&sid=14&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
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The question at the heart of this dissertation is how two autonomous individuals who desire intimacy can sustain passion without becoming controlling, needy, bored, or chaotically reactive. This question has led me to focus on how depth psychology can inform David Schnarch's theory of sustaining a "passionate marriage"&mdash; marriage denoting emotionally committed couples of all orientations. Schnarch argues that the individuals in a marriage must maintain their own integrity through Murray Bowen's notion of differentiation , which indicates the ability to be emotionally objective, that is, to be caring and intimate, while being nonreactive and separate. Schnarch shows how the sexual relation of a couple reveals dynamics ultimately grounded in their level of differentiation. Moreover, he explains how the enhancement of differentiation fosters passion, intimacy, eroticism, and spirituality within a couple's marital and sexual relation.

This paper addresses the ways in which Carl Jung's notion of individuation deepens and amplifies the notion of differentiation in reference to a couple becoming more nearly whole and passionate within marriage. Specifically, I will apply Jung's theory of the unconscious, the psychological typologies, and their corresponding inferior functions to intimate relations to give further descriptive nuance to problems of fusion (or undifferentiation) within marital relations and sex. Further, I will describe some of the potential subtleties of unrealized sexual potential stemming from one-sided psychological typologies. It is fitting that Jung's discussion of the alchemical conjunction of opposites as a metaphor for the process of individuation also represents the sexual union between two people.

A heuristic search for the discovery of personal meaning of passionate relationships led me in my choice and application of Jungian work to Schnarch's texts. A hermeneutic study of Jungian texts grounds the depth-psychological research around the themes of interpretation and intuition. Appropriately, hermeneutic dialectical inquiry may be an apt metaphor for the openness needed for soul to dance in passionate marriage.
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/***
|Name|TagCloudPlugin|
|Source|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#TagCloudPlugin|
|Version|0.0.0|
|Author|Clint Checketts|
|License|unknown|
|~CoreVersion|2.1|
|Type|plugin|
|Requires||
|Overrides||
|Description||

!Usage
<<tagCloud>>

!Code
***/
//{{{
version.extensions.tagCloud = {major: 1, minor: 0 , revision: 0, date: new Date(2006,2,04)};
//Created by Clint Checketts, contributions by Jonny Leroy and Eric Shulman

config.macros.tagCloud = {
 noTags: "No tag cloud created because there are no tags.",
 tooltip: "%1 tiddlers tagged with '%0'"
};

config.macros.tagCloud.handler = function(place,macroName,params) {
 
var tagCloudWrapper = createTiddlyElement(place,"div",null,"tagCloud",null);

var tags = store.getTags();
for (var t=0; t<tags.length; t++) {
  for (var p=0;p<params.length; p++) if (tags[t][0] == params[p]) tags[t][0] = "";
}

 if(tags.length == 0) 
   createTiddlyElement(tagCloudWrapper,"span",null,null,this.noTags);
 //Findout the maximum number of tags
 var mostTags = 0;
 for (var t=0; t<tags.length; t++) if (tags[t][0].length > 0){
  if (tags[t][1] > mostTags) mostTags = tags[t][1];
 }
 //divide the mostTags into 4 segments for the 4 different tagCloud sizes
 var tagSegment = mostTags / 4;

  for (var t=0; t<tags.length; t++) if (tags[t][0].length > 0){
 var tagCloudElement = createTiddlyElement(tagCloudWrapper,"span",null,null,null);
 tagCloudWrapper.appendChild(document.createTextNode(" "));
 var theTag = createTiddlyButton(tagCloudElement,tags[t][0],this.tooltip.format(tags[t]),onClickTag,"tagCloudtag tagCloud" + (Math.round(tags[t][1]/tagSegment)+1));
  theTag.setAttribute("tag",tags[t][0]);
 }

};

setStylesheet(".tagCloud span{height: 1.8em;margin: 3px;}.tagCloud1{font-size: 1.2em;}.tagCloud2{font-size: 1.4em;}.tagCloud3{font-size: 1.6em;}.tagCloud4{font-size: 1.8em;}.tagCloud5{font-size: 1.8em;font-weight: bold;}","tagCloudsStyles");
//}}}
Callan, G. (2002). //Temenos: The Primordial Vessel and the Mysteries of "9/11"//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3113900|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765196581&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
Temenos is the sacred container known by the alchemist as the retort or vas hermeticum, by the freemason as the cathedral or rotundus, by the analyst as the consulting room and the transferential relationship itself. Carl Jung viewed the individuation process as an alchemical endeavor in which the analysand, the analyst, and the vessel of their relationship are transformed in the furnace of analysis. In this light, the vessel is both the agent and the object of transmutation.

This dissertation employs a blend of artistic and hermeneutic methodologies. In the tradition of phenomenology, the researcher opens to a hermetic mode of consciousness as a vehicle for bearing witness to the world. She employs psychological, anthropological, philosophical, mythological, religious, literary, architectural, and cosmological theory to probe the question: What makes a container transformational, and how might we partake of its medicine? With the massive breakdown of containment in our world, a strong tincture of imagination must be brought to this psychological enterprise. The researcher dwells inside the inquiry until it yields an empirical response in image, poetry, reverie, memoir, and visual art.

In the individuation of a person, a culture, or a global community, a process of deconstruction, dissociation, and annihilation takes place. The old vessel gives way and familiar notions of containment must be abandoned. This dissertation seeks to encounter "9/11" as an exemplary retort, or vas mirabile . In the national and global psyche, our pathologies have arisen to inseminate the future. At the heart of this study is the contention that the macrocosm of our plight and our possibility is encoded in the microcosm of every gesture, artifact, and dream left in the wake of the World Trade Center explosion&mdash;and in the individual and collective psyche.
<<<
Green, T. (2002). //The Breath of Gaia: Environmental Illness as a vehicle to consciousness//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3081677|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765316271&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
In varying degrees, environmental illness (EI), affects 15%-30% of the population in the United States at this time. Although I do not pretend to understand either the physical or psychological causes of this dis-ease, I have attempted here to gain a deeper understanding of what it is to experience environmental illness. I asked the questions, why this dis-ease and why now? Environmental illness is a very controversial diagnosis. My exploration of EI focused more on the deeper meaning or learning to be gained from EI than on the validity of the dis-ease itself. One could say I was looking for the silver lining of environmental illness.

Using hermeneutic and heuristic methods, I explored the medical model and then the research done by psychologists and social workers. The field of psychoneuroimmunology was explored briefly. In my meandering through varied research I have uncovered a connection between addictive behavior and environmental illness both of which are characterized by avoidance. Those with EI avoid anything and everything they feel contributes to their illness; while those people with addictions tend to avoid feelings. Those suffering from both diseases have unrecognized feelings of fear and shame.

At the root of the dis-ease of environmental illness is a culture caught up in what I call the toxic womb. It is a world of nonengagement, which leads to a snowball-like pile-up of stress in our lives. This is a world deeply separated from a sense of connection with self, nature, and the Divine. In order for a deeper understanding of the dis-ease to be reached, one must surrender to the illness and explore its deeper meanings.
<<<
Gordon, R. (2004). //The Murder of Spinoza and Other l7^^th^^-Century Alchemists: a Contemporary Look at a Long-ago Mortificatio Tale//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2004). (Publication No. AAT [[3155814|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=828435891&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This dissertation is a theoretical work, using a hermeneutic method to discuss the psycho-historical significance of Baruch Spinoza's relationship with alchemy. Typical assessments and criticisms of scientific thinking traced back to the 17^^th^^ century accuse Newton and Descartes of sprinting Western thinking down a thorny path separating mind from body. Historians describe a time in the 17^^th^^ century when the world experienced a momentous scientific paradigm shift. This was a time when it is believed that the Western concept of a mind-body or spirit-matter split emerged as the leading scientific paradigm. Whereas historians and philosophers have described prolific development in this period of far-reaching exploration, they have neglected to include a significant area of study that influences both science and depth psychology: alchemy.

This study argues that the study of alchemy played a considerable role in developing major scientific theories. Alchemy interrelates religion, matter, spirit, and soul. The study explores how a separatio between body, soul, and spirit takes place within the context of an alchemical notion of the world. It draws on Jung's (1967) view of the spirit-soul-body triumvirate that was prevalent during the Middle Ages, a view which is evident in his discussion //spiritus mundi//. The study is an alternative look through a depth-psychological lens at events that occurred around the time of the 17^^th^^ century that influenced our scientific evolution. It demonstrates how alchemy was studied by thinkers such as Baruch Spinoza, Robert Boyle, Isaac Newton, and numerous other scientists, a fact that has been largely ignored except in the esoteric science literature.

There is evidence that there was a truly archetypal split in alchemical studies that mirrored the separatio of the Magnum Opus. Depth psychology opens up an entirely new perspective for looking at these events. In the course of employing the hermeneutic method, alchemy as both a material and spiritual-psychological phenomenon are defined and reflected upon. The Scientific Revolution and its bridge between medieval thinking and modern science is examined. Science and its unconscious search for God are discussed within the context of Jung's writing on the God-image. The elders and their place in guiding young scientists also emerged as a theme of the work. Finally, my own alchemical experience of a rather remarkable year concretized the spiritual-alchemical world with the material world in which I reside. As I write in my final chapter, this journey with alchemy, Spinoza, Newton, and science is not complete, just concluded for the moment.
<<<
Rose (2001). //The Storyteller's Journey//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2001). (Publication No. AAT [[3029749|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726041401&sid=3&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
//The Storyteller's Journey// is an archetypal, metaphorical, and mythological exploration of the woman storyteller's creative process. Addressed are the following questions: How is undertaking the creative storytelling process like the archetype of the journey of the heroine? What impact might mythologizing the storytelling process as the journey of the heroine have on a woman storyteller? How does the woman storyteller invoke and experience the Muse?

Employing theoretical and artistic methodologies, this dissertation examines the archetypal journey of the woman storyteller through an exploration of texts written by women storytellers and writers about their experience of the creative process. Explored, too, are myths, fairy tales, and stories about women, as well as the dissertation author's experience writing the six short creative pieces included in the dissertation.

Turning to the pre-Classical, pre-Hellenic (pre-Olympian) Goddess myths&mdash;expressly, the myths of the Three Muses and the Goddess Hecate&mdash;this dissertation aims to restory the creative process for the woman storyteller in the images and language closest to the source of feminine power. These archaic myths, to the extent that we know them, serve as metaphors that offer a different, nonpathological perspective on her (creative) storytelling experience.

//The Storyteller's Journey// posits a three-fold view of creativity: inspiration (the individual Muse), process or journey (the Three Muses), and form (here Polyhymnia , muse of sacred song and storytelling). Here the Three Muses&mdash; Mneme (Memory or Remembering), Melete (Practice/Meditation or Practicing/Meditating), and Aoide (Song or Singing)&mdash;are stages or steps in the woman storyteller's journey, whereas the individual Muse is reimagined and renamed as the Goddess of Life, Death, and Regeneration, known in the Greek pantheon as Hecate. As individual Muse, Hecate stands at the crossroads where Memory, Meditation, and Song meet in both her birth or life-giving form and in her death-giving aspect simultaneously. Together the Three Muses and Hecate represent the feminine creative powers.

This dissertation suggests that each storyteller contains within herself and in the stories she tells her own creative fate and imaginative power.
<<<
Jakala, R. E. (2006). //The complex nature of secrets, the secret nature of complexes: An analysis of a secret keeper//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3281476|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1404355671&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
This dissertation examines the value of secrets as determined by their content as well as the context in which they are held or told. The purpose of this work is to explore how the theories of Freud and Jung influence our current views of secrets. The personal secrets they kept that are now known are briefly reviewed for their influence on Freud and Jung's secret position. Several of the author's secrets are used as examples to explore and compare their theories regarding the formation and maintenance of those secrets. This work demonstrates the relationship between the secret and the secret keeper/revealer. Much of the focus of this work is in defining and exploring complexes through a Freudian and Jungian view. It explores the secret position—secret keeper or secret revealer—as it relates to the dynamics of complexes. This dissertation employs the alchemical hermeneutic method to define and explore the secret position. The method provided a venue to explore how conscious and unconscious secrets influence behavior. This dissertation discusses how psychotherapy can incorporate those ingredients in working through the dynamics of the secret position.
<<<
Mitchell, L. H. (2006). //The eco-imaginal underpinnings of community identity in Harmony Grove Valley//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. AAT [[3211955|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1184165961&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
''Abstract''

This study grew out of 5 years of community and ecological fieldwork in Harmony Grove valley, Escondido, California. It is an exploration of the ecological imagination as it relates to community place-relations and identity. By way of interviews, community art, images, and dialogue, I look for an emerging eco-imaginal voice surfacing within the implaced community. Implaced-community refers to the ways that community, person, and place determine one other.

The eco-imaginal is the commonality we share with all life forms; it makes possible human-nature and human-place communication: an intersentience experienced as the mapping of the world within the lived body. This body-place/world unity&mdash;a view based in the thinking of ~Merleau-Ponty and Edward Casey as well as the ageless tradition of panpsychism&mdash;informs my perspective. The triad of body, place, and depth establishes the context for the study of the ecological imagination.

Depth provides the ultimate dimension of inclusivity. The visible world is the surface of an inexhaustible depth wherein all things mutually implicate one another. In this way, the visible and the invisible, matter and psyche, the global and the local, the simultaneous and the successive are intimately bound together, thereby setting the field for eco-imaginal experiencing.

The dual purpose of this study is to look at primal structures, such as the eco-imaginal, place-loss, and participatory awareness, that subtend a community's sense of place and to also foster a liberatory sensibility as a basis of advocacy for our communities and neighborhoods. In particular, this work responds to the need for developing terminology and modes of thinking sufficiently free of mechanistic metaphors to be resonant with the natural world.

The nomadic methodology I am using is an engaged response to the postmodern condition of placelessness. It is based in an attitude of deterritorialization and accountability along with the creation of free spaces. Extensive boundary-crossing between disciplines, the use of multiple voices, styles, and perspectives, and the mixing of the theoretical and lyrical characterize this basically phenomenological approach. In this climate, the recovery of place-relations can flourish: resiliency can be re-inspired and reanimated.
<<<
Rowe, J. (2006). //The experience of mystery in enduring love: Embracing the soul of marriage//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. AAT [[3211959|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1127203301&sid=5&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This study investigates the ways in which married couples experience the reality of mystery in the midst of the heights and depths of lasting love. The question is asked: What are the principles and practices involved in maintaining a felt sense of mystery beyond the excitement of romance and the exchanging of sacred vows?

A phenomenological method was used in order to uncover some of the conscious and unconscious aspects of mystery in the marriages of four couples who served as co-researchers. In addition to carrying out in-depth interviews with each couple, an imaginal approach was used in working with the phenomenological data collected. Through the use of the researcher's own dreams, reveries, and contemplative attention to images, the symbolic and metaphoric aspects of the phenomena being studied came into clear focus. Also, the hermeneutic task was deepened through the use of transference dialogues which served to monitor and maintain the researcher's vocational connection to the topic. This process allowed for a dialectical understanding of the ways in which the topic was impacted by the researcher as well as the ways in which the researcher was impacted by the topic. This highly creative use of a rigorous phenomenological method facilitated the creation of portrait analyses which revealed many of the hidden aspects of mystery as experienced by the couples involved in the study.

The following essential themes of mystery in enduring love were discovered: (1) The Story of Us: Being Birthed into Love; (2) Integrating Otherness: The Mystery Within and the Mystery Between; (3) Symptoms and Chaos in the Relationship as Expressions of Soul; (4) Creating a Space of Hospitality for the Mystery of Love; and (5) A Commitment That Binds and Frees. These themes are highly suggestive of the possibility for re-mystifying marriage along the lines of honoring the sacred mysteries of otherness, both within oneself as well as with one's spouse. Also, this study clearly demonstrates the potential of marriage to serve as a sacred crucible or container that can facilitate the transformation of loving commitment into a path for the development of personal freedom and wholeness.
<<<
Tannen, R. L.(2002). //The fictive-female sleuth: Mirro, myth, and metaphor//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. [[AAT 3247254|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1253514331&sid=5&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This dissertation focuses upon the radical potency of popular literature to transform imagination into reality. It is a theoretical investigation which identifies the linkages between the appearance of fictive female sleuths on the North American literary scene and the simultaneous emergence of critical discourses in feminism, ethnicity, gender, and postcolonial studies as synergistic transformative energies.

In the last 20 years of the 20 th century, there was a seismic wave of change in mystery fiction as the feminist fictive female sleuth took center stage. My thesis is that these fictive female sleuth narratives fill the psychological yearning that many kinds of women&mdash;white, off-white, women of color, middle class, working class, heterosexuals, lesbian, bi-sexual and different ethnic minorities&mdash;have for imagery and narratives of women as resourceful, independent, strong, and reflective of the diversity found in the reader's lives. The evidence indicates that as the genre developed, there has been an increasing plethora of sexually, ethnically, and socially diverse fictive portrayals of women demonstrating agency, autonomy, and authority.

My research reveals that the intersection of mystery fiction, the feminine and postmodern consciousness, alchemically blended with humor and social awareness, has produced a boundary-crossing, process-oriented, postmodern fictive female sleuth trickster. This trickster energy uses the traditional detective genre strategically to subvert and transform not only the genre itself but the collective consciousness related to the feminine.

This postmodern female trickster builds bridges across difference and diversity. The nature of her postmodern trick is physical and psychological movement by a soul embodied as female crossing boundaries with humor. Humor is the energy, movement is the process and embodiment is in a female image who refuses to be a victim.

The postmodern, fictive female sleuth tricksters I have investigated, Kinsey Millhone, V. I. Warshawski, Kate Shugak, and Blanche White, have constellated a liminal psychic terrain where the seeds of restoration and transformation can be planted in the reader's imaginal realms, thus transforming imagination into reality.
<<<
Hart, M. (2001). //The heart's cry for image: Painting and depth psychology//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2001). (Publication No. AAT [[3035186|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726123451&sid=3&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This creative dissertation project concerns the exclusion of image and the imaginal realm from mainstream Western culture. It is an examination of both the necessity for and the cost of the loss of image and the imaginal from our world. The subject matter is examined from the personal and the collective levels. The literature review, therefore, is divided in two sections. First is the personal perspective, including a discussion of the negative mother complex and impediments to a move from potential to competence. The second section of the literature review concerns the cultural perspective and includes discussions of active imagination and individuation, individuation through creativity, image true and false, the imaginal realm, "imaginal" as a category of art, painting in the United States from 1950-2000, CE, art and the unconscious, a worldview that excludes&mdash;the fallacy of psyche as singular and internal, the negative feminine/female in a woman, identity issues and contemporary female experience, and individuation and women.

The method is heuristic. This method was both part of the creative process and the means through which the project was examined. For the creative element, 25 paintings were done in an attempt to break through a decades&mdash;old block in the writer's ability to move from potential to realization as a painter. On the personal level, this block was a result of a deep negative mother complex in the writer. On the cultural level, this block is a reflection of mainstream Western culture's rejection of the feminine, the female, and, hence, psyche and the imaginal.

The questions this work asks are as follows: what is it for a person, for a culture, to seek and find image (in this case in painting) and its source (the imaginal)? What does a return to the imaginal produce? The assertion of this project is that without the imaginal realm and its expression (image) one cannot live a full human life. Without image and the imaginal, the world in which one struggles to be human is a context increasingly disconnected from nature, from soul, and from life.
<<<
Gilbert, K. L. (2006). //The mermaid archetype//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3264656|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1328075221&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
This theoretical study follows the mermaid archetype through history, mythology, legend, and modern narrative to discern why and how the archetype invites human consciousness into its depths and to discern the cultural significance of her image. Through the use of a hybrid methodology including both traditional and visionary/imaginal hermeneutics as well as heuristic research, this study reveals that although the mermaid archetype is traditionally understood as a divided creature, it is more accurately understood as a symbolic confluence of human and fish, of maiden, mother, and crone, and of a unique vision that encompasses consciousness and unconsciousness as a single perceptual event. In contrast to the mermaid archetype's deific ancestral lineage, the modern renderings of this archetype are shown to reflect that the feminine psyche is bound by the psychological notion of the anima and by the cultural ideals that prohibit expression of feminine power. This archetype reclaims the power associated with vulvic embodiment, making clear that feminine power is submerged in the form of the mermaid archetype and overt in her associated form of the Sheela-na-gig. The mermaid archetype's invitation into the depths of consciousness, while not always benevolent, is in service of transformation. As initiator, threshold figure, and an aspect of the medial woman, the mermaid is identified as an ally of the archetypal feminine. She is a numinous symbol of the maiden-mother-crone dynamic, catalyzing the transformations of the feminine life cycle. Further, the mermaid archetype is found to act in service of transformation by formation of relationship of the individual psyche with the world soul, or //anima mundi//. The Jungian concept of the shadow is evidenced in the mermaid archetype through her own enchantment. She is seduced into consciousness to play out the dramas and narratives that form her mythology and narratives. The mermaid archetype's familiarity with the depths of the unconscious fix her as central to the psychological experience of depression, which is discussed in this study as a longing for remembrance and reconnection with the vivifying and transforming aspects of this archetype.
<<<
Hiles, C. A. (2002). //The night sea journey: Whale as symbol of transformation//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3046052|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726348441&sid=2&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This dissertation chronicles my ongoing engagement with whale-as-image, documenting my effort to assimilate the image into consciousness. Unlike many academic endeavors that begin with theoretical ideas, this dissertation began with a strong unarticulated feeling and followed an intuitive impulse into the heart of the whale image. Such a study of psyche, rooted in subjective experiment, is guided by consciousness that is differentiated from but not split off from the instincts. This uniquely Jungian approach activates the instinctual imagination and allows one to apprehend the interior of the image by knowing it through the feeling, intuitive, and sensate functions.

Jung suggests that the realization and assimilation of instinct never takes place by absorption into the instinctual sphere but only through integration of the image "which signifies and at the same time evokes the instinct." As a unifying symbol of the self, the whale image served this function for me. Sticking to it&mdash;that is, integrating it consciously into my life and imagination&mdash;evoked a visceral knowledge of the instinct underlying the image. This instinct for individuation carried me from my initial encounter with blue whale through a historical, mythical, literary, and alchemical amplification of the image.

I begin by discussing the inception, symptoms, and consequences of my fascination with the whale. Next I discuss the solar and lunar aspects of the heroic quest. Historically the solar hero succeeds in his quest for self-definition by slaying the whale/sea-monster, a triumph of differentiated consciousness over the chaotic forces of the unconscious. In the lunar version of the mythologem, the hero is swallowed by the instinctual forces of the chthonic feminine and achieves self-transformation by containing the opposites and psychologically activating the transcendent function.

Last, I explore the seven stages of alchemical and psychological transformation that result from making a night sea journey. The examination of the central image of the whale in this mythologem allows a re-experiencing of its archetypal core, deepening our understanding of this powerful imago and permitting it to pass from head learning to heart wisdom.
<<<
Miller, W. Z. (2002). //The psyche-centered zone of peak performance: Depth psychology applied to golf//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3077725|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765234681&sid=9&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This study asks: How can depth psychology transform sport psychology, specifically in golf? Employing a dialogical, hermeneutic method, this theoretical dissertation establishes three bodies of literature and places them in dialog. The initial body is a review of published writings on traditional sport psychology in golf, and in the second, selected theories of depth psychology are explored in the context of sport psychology. Finally, the text is introduced as the third body&mdash;a combination of //The Legend of Bagger Vance// , a golf novel by Stephen Pressfield (1995), and the mythic, Hindu poem, the //Bhagavad Gita//.

The literature of today's sport psychology in golf is primarily ego psychology and is ill equipped to address such complex subjects as the mysterious zone of peak performance or holding it together under pressure, the antithesis of falling apart or choking. To explore these topics, this work imaginatively amplifies two fictional stories, creating a conversation between both traditional sport psychology and selected depth psychological concepts.

Emerging from this dialog are ideas that can be applied to sport psychology in golf, creating a depth-sport psychology. One of the key concepts is that, under stress, a golfer does not hold it together by will-power or desire, but is actually held together by a trans-personal dynamic. The transcendent function helps explain this mystery, as does the ego-Self axis theory by Edward Edinger (1972).

A new image of the zone emerges: the psyche-centered zone of peak performance, a state of conscious transcendence. In this model, the zone is differentiated into three levels&mdash;the pre-personal or level 2, the personal or level 3, and the transpersonal or level 4. Implied in this theory is that the zone is developmental in nature, and that a golfer's level of consciousness and ego development determine the level of the zone in which he or she plays.

Because golf is not played against an opponent, as in tennis, baseball, or basketball, but often against the Self, depth psychology is particularly well suited to be applied to the game. The unconscious and its many manifestations play a major role in the golfing experience, and golfers who understand and align with the Self will play up to their skill level more consistently. Liberated from excessive anxiety and the fear of choking under pressure, the conscious golfer is truly free to play the game in a state of natural transcendence.
<<<
Wade, J. B. (2002). The voices within the anorexic. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. AAT [[3064158|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=764918561&sid=6&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
Research focused upon the question of what is the lived experience of the internal landscape of anorexia? Subquestions were: (1) What are the significant internal experiences and conversations experienced by the anorexic? (2) Does the anorexic experience self-criticism? If so, how is this criticism experienced? What are the attitudes, conflicts, feelings, and thoughts experienced during those times? (3) When anorexics experience inner voices, what are these voices like and what do they say? How does the anorexic's relation to these voices change through the phases of her illness?

Using Giorgi's (1989) phenomenological method, interviews with six recovering anorexics were analyzed to determine their situation structures and general structure of meaning with regard to the lived internal experience of anorexia. Brown and Gilligan's (1992) voice-centered method was also used. Voices of psychological distress and of resistance and resilience were identified and described.

The interviews revealed the women's experience of having grown up in faulty facilitating environments that were critical and unresponsive to their emotional needs. As females, they were seen to be negatively affected by patriarchal culture, society, and media that demand self-worth through thinness and external beauty. Shame and low self-esteem led the anorexic to aspire to be perfect in order to be loved.

The constant comparison of herself to others viewed by her as admirable, slim, and popular contributed to obsession to be valued by achieving perfection through thinness. Through starvation, exercise, and other means, as weight-loss increased, psychological and physiological functioning was affected. She began to hear persecutory, taunting, critical voices that were abusive of her for eating or not eating, being fat, being ugly and gross. She felt depersonalized, at their mercy; she experienced intense self-hatred and self-loathing.

As each woman began to doubt the veracity of these self-critical voices, she became more capable of taking her own stand in relation to normative societal overvaluing of female slimness. Voices of resistance to cultural norms and voices of resilience were critical to recovery.
<<<
Hull, J. W. (2003). //The wilderness of belonging: A study of the transformative power of intentional community//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2003). (Publication No. AAT [[3155816|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=828435911&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]]).
<<<
This study undertook a psychological examination of the phenomenon of an intentional community enterprise, which was founded in 1996 and is currently operating in New York City and the surrounding suburbs. Following a participatory hermeneutic approach to the project, I developed the core research questions in collaboration with community members and explored and expanded upon them through dialogue, interviews, and creative art projects. The goals of the research were three-fold: to investigate the transformative power of community by exploring issues of safety, belonging, personal healing, spiritual growth, and the rich dialectic between self, other, and the group; to further the growth of the community through participatory dialogue with the individuals who are specifically committed to nurturing it; and to develop a theoretical understanding of intentional community&mdash;with particular focus on concerns of meaning, value, purpose, leadership and sustainability&mdash;and its potential social and cultural ramifications in a postmodern context.

With the emergence of intentional community groups like the one in this study, in the environs of post-9/11 New York City, my hypothesis has been that these endeavors may represent a grass-roots attempt at the compensatory and liberating cycle of transformation Jung points to as the response of soul to periods of cultural and social fragmentation. It is my hope that juxtaposing the perspectives of Jung, post-Jungians, post-Freudians, liberation psychologists, imaginal psychologists, and others against the themes brought forth by the participants in this specific intentional community, will reinvigorate, expand and reinforce the case for the applicability and relevance of depth psychological theory to small group situations.

It is my contention that with the inevitable demise of dyadic therapy&mdash;or at the very least its diminishment in the West as the chosen modality to treat psychological suffering&mdash;there is a need for depth psychologists to expand their repertoire to include client configurations greater than one. In this project, I aim to make a contribution in this regard, by demonstrating how, on a small group scale, the theory and praxis of depth psychology may be positioned at the threshold of a new frontier: individual&mdash;and cultural&mdash;healing and restoration in a community setting.
<<<
Stinchfield, J. (2006). //This World Full of Grace: Living the Imaginal Into Everday Life//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication no. [[AAT 3264669|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1328047901&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
 This work seeks to address a wounding that has occurred in the culture on both the collective and the personal levels as a result of a split between psyche and matter. Henri Corbin, the Sufi scholar, refers to that middle space between psyche and matter as the mundus imaginalis, and Jung speaks of it as the psychoid space. This is the space of synchronicities, visions, dreams, and the magic that occurs in everyday life, and yet we are often too busy to take notice. Opening our hearts to these imaginal experiences, we begin to heal the split through a recovery of a lost part of ourselves and our ability to access these other realms of consciousness. The imaginal world is as real as the worlds of the senses and of the intellect, and it is readily available to us through the often neglected doorway of our own imaginations.

 Alchemical hermeneutics, which is derived from traditional hermeneutics and yet is more closely related to the new hermeneutics in that it recognizes the intimate connection between the researcher and the work, is a natural choice for doing research concerning the imaginal as it allows for the voice of the soul in the work. Jung has often stressed the importance of direct experience in moving us towards a true gnosis, and this is taken into account as the researcher relates, through the language of storytelling, examples of dreams, synchronicities, images, and active imaginations that are felt experiences of the imaginal world erupting into this one.

 There are several themes that are important to the challenge of living the imaginal into the everyday. This work explores the importance of balance through attention paid to the image, particularly through an amplification of the image of the moon. It takes seriously the presence of imaginal figures and treats them with utmost respect as integral to the research. Hermes in his guises as the child and the trickster helps to give us a sense of both the energy of the imaginal world and also a way in which to approach it.

 It is often difficult to articulate experiences of the imaginal world and, in addition, many have been silenced as to these experiences. The tradition of depth psychology assists in recovering and bringing light to what has been covered over creating balance between the worlds of the everyday and the imaginal, a balance that is sorely missing in our culture. This work seeks to address that loss by celebrating both worlds, as they are forever connected. Furthermore, this study, as an answer to an individuation call, is an example in itself, through its writing, of living the imaginal into everyday life. 
<<<
Noriega, M. d. J. (2007). //Timelessness//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2007). (Publication No. [[AAT 3281471|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1404353821&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
We live most of our lives within linear time, which is fixed and static, and we tend to find the experience of timelessness improbable and contrary to the established order of things. Often, the collective and personal experiences of timelessness have been relegated to either pathological or mystical realms. The purpose of this work is to concentrate on timelessness, based upon the atemporality of the unconscious that stem from the depth psychology of Sigmund Freud and Carl Gustav Jung. Using a hemeneutic and heuristic methodology, this phenomenological and theoretical research expands and deepens new understandings of the lived experience of timelessness as a crucial contribution to the process of collective and personal individuation and regeneration, and as an archetypal experience that allows to see things in diverse ways connecting to the imaginal, emotional, sacred, and mythic dimension. In order to deconstruct the superiority of linear time, topics that have sustained it are analyzed such as the myth of Chronos and monotheism vs. polytheism in time, and the symbolism of calendars and clocks. Timelessness is examined through the trinity of time within varied experiences. In the present time timelessness is found in attention and concentration, joy and ecstasy, illness and hope, flow and work. In the past, timelessness appears in memory as suspension of time and its relationship with the loss of paradise, and in the future through the depathologizing of dèjá vu and the analysis of synchronicity and time travel. Slowness is amplified as a precursor to timelessness in daily life and in the analytic encounter. Within the consulting room, timelessness is present in experiences such as waiting, kairos, synchronicity, and timeless presence. This work also contains a depth perspective analysis of artistic manifestations closely related to timelessness. The findings of this research affirm the presence of timelessness, inviting a depth revision of the many forms in which we have nurtured Father Time at the expense of forgetting to care for Mother Timelessness, and reveal the conceptual foundation of what I have termed temporal temenos.
<<<
/***

|Name|ToggleSideBarMacro|
|Created by|SaqImtiaz|
|Location|http://tw.lewcid.org/#ToggleSideBarMacro|
|Version|1.0|
|Requires|~TW2.x|
!Description:
Provides a button for toggling visibility of the SideBar. You can choose whether the SideBar should initially be hidden or displayed.

!Demo
<<toggleSideBar "Toggle Sidebar">>

!Usage:
{{{<<toggleSideBar>>}}} <<toggleSideBar>>
additional options:
{{{<<toggleSideBar label tooltip show/hide>>}}} where:
label = custom label for the button,
tooltip = custom tooltip for the button,
show/hide = use one or the other, determines whether the sidebar is shown at first or not.
(default is to show the sidebar)

You can add it to your tiddler toolbar, your MainMenu, or where you like really.
If you are using a horizontal MainMenu and want the button to be right aligned, put the following in your StyleSheet:
{{{ .HideSideBarButton {float:right;} }}}

!History
*23-07-06: version 1.0: completely rewritten, now works with custom stylesheets too, and easier to customize start behaviour. 
*20-07-06: version 0.11
*27-04-06: version 0.1: working.

!Code
***/
//{{{
config.macros.toggleSideBar={};

config.macros.toggleSideBar.settings={
         styleHide :  "#sidebar { display: none;}\n"+"#contentWrapper #displayArea { margin-right: 1em;}\n"+"",
         styleShow : " ",
         arrow1: "«",
         arrow2: "»"
};

config.macros.toggleSideBar.handler=function (place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler)
{
          var tooltip= params[1]||'toggle sidebar';
          var mode = (params[2] && params[2]=="hide")? "hide":"show";
          var arrow = (mode == "hide")? this.settings.arrow1:this.settings.arrow2;
          var label= (params[0]&&params[0]!='.')?params[0]+" "+arrow:arrow;
          var theBtn = createTiddlyButton(place,label,tooltip,this.onToggleSideBar,"button HideSideBarButton");
          if (mode == "hide")
             { 
             (document.getElementById("sidebar")).setAttribute("toggle","hide");
              setStylesheet(this.settings.styleHide,"ToggleSideBarStyles");
             }
};

config.macros.toggleSideBar.onToggleSideBar = function(){
          var sidebar = document.getElementById("sidebar");
          var settings = config.macros.toggleSideBar.settings;
          if (sidebar.getAttribute("toggle")=='hide')
             {
              setStylesheet(settings.styleShow,"ToggleSideBarStyles");
              sidebar.setAttribute("toggle","show");
              this.firstChild.data= (this.firstChild.data).replace(settings.arrow1,settings.arrow2);
              }
          else
              {    
               setStylesheet(settings.styleHide,"ToggleSideBarStyles");
               sidebar.setAttribute("toggle","hide");
               this.firstChild.data= (this.firstChild.data).replace(settings.arrow2,settings.arrow1);
              }

     return false;
}

setStylesheet(".HideSideBarButton .button {font-weight:bold; padding: 0 5px;}\n","ToggleSideBarButtonStyles");

//}}}
Irias, P. (2006). //Unearthing the soul I left underneath a mango tree: A phenomenological exploration of the experiences of Nicaraguan refugees//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2006). (Publication No. [[AAT 3238861|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1251887431&Fmt=7&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
This study focused upon the question of what is the lived experience of Nicaraguans who chose to leave their homeland after the revolution in the 1970s and resettle in the United States? Specific research questions within this problem were as follows: (1) What was sacrificed and what was gained by the decision of Nicaraguans to leave their homeland after the revolution and move to the United States? (2) What memories did Nicaraguans have of the revolution and how were their lives affected by those memories? I employed the phenomenological method and Clark Moustakas' (1994) modification of the Van Kaam method of analysis of phenomenological data in interviewing and examining the dialogues of nine Nicaraguan refugees. The participants included three males and six females. Four of the participants had been children at the time of the war and resettlement and five of them had been adults. Through the organization of themes and essences, I created a textural-structural description of the lived experiences of Nicaraguan refugees who left their country of origin after the revolution. I also incorporated Moustakas' heuristic methodology (1990) in this inquiry by exploring my inner processes and my role as a researcher. The interviewees revealed experiences of living in extreme fear, uncertainty, and anxiety during the war, struggling to get basic necessities, and fearing for their lives and the lives of their loved ones. After the revolution, the participants experienced disillusionment with the new government, mixed feelings regarding making the decision to leave Nicaragua, and grief and loss resulting from leaving loved ones, their home, and their culture behind. Crucial themes for the participants once they arrived in the United States included culture shock, a period of time marked by anxiety and disorientation resulting from losing all familiar signs and symbols of social interaction, difficulty in adjusting to a new culture, feelings of isolation and disconnection from their roots, struggles with their identity and roles, and experiencing poverty, lack of support and resources, discrimination, and posttraumatic stress syndrome.
<<<
Davis, G. W. (2007). //Unfinished heroes: The abandoned hero's journey of contemporary business leaders//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2007). (Publication No. [[AAT 3281471|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1404346201&sid=4&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
A leader establishes a vision of the future, initiates changes necessary to make the vision a reality, and unleashes others' talents to create the reality. Businesses and other organizations are noticeably short of leaders, settling instead for underdeveloped managers who unknowingly embody confusing cultural and mythological influences.

This dissertation proposes that leader-making is analogous to the mythical hero's journey. If undergone in its entirety, the heroic journey experience is key to moving past managing to become a leader. When death confronts the hero in the underworld ordeal, one choice is to succumb, to surrender ego control and to continue through an initiatory, numinous transformation or rebirth. One is then able to reflect desirable mythological models for leadership, including the archetypes of wise man or woman, sage, healer, shaman, guide, elder, or sage commander as the social or corporate communities require.

But many would-be leaders abandon the journey half way. In the liminality of the ordeal, rather than allowing the present ego to die, then to integrate heretofore unconscious contents, they defy the process. Regression to a prior successful persona, often that of warrior, is more comfortable but ego and unconscious remain unintegrated and in tension. The warrior is stuck in the ordeal, and must forever battle death. Life is a struggle.

This is a theoretical research project, creating emergent theoretical models of leader-making, and is also the record of a personal hero's journey by the author, an elder executive who is active in leadership development, taken in the spirit of alchemical hermeneutics.
<<<
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar closeTiddler closeOthers +editTiddler permalink references jump'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='subtitle'></div>
<div class='viewer' macro='view text wikified'></div>
<div class='tagClear'></div>
<div macro="showWhen tiddler.tags.contains('Depth Psychology')">
Advisor: <span macro="view advisor wikified"></span>
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<div macro="showWhen tiddler.tags.contains('Depth Psychology')">
External Reader: <span macro="view externalreader wikified"></span>
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Amrhein, P.A. (2002). //Vocation as Redemption: Returning to the Church as a Path of Individuation//. (Doctoral dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2002). (Publication No. [[AAT 3107137|http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765013631&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=45844&RQT=309&VName=PQD]])
<<<
Return is a resolution, a reconstitution of a departure, loss, or rupture. Universalized in the mono-myth of the hero's journey, return is an archetypal theme fundamental to the ritual of shamanic initiation, the spiritual path of descent into darkness preceding light, and the Christian myth of death and rebirth. Cradle Catholics returning to the Church as a path of individuation dramatize this journey. Return to the Church, viewed through the lens of analytical psychology and seen as part of a mutually fueled process of redemption of God, Church, and human being, is the subject of this hermeneutical study.

Through the duality of private and communal experience, the Church offers a template for wholeness, or redemption. The mandala, with its center representing the mystical experience of unity and the periphery representing the opposites, is an image of the individual and collective nature of the Church, whose energy flows between the inner and the outer in the regression and progression of praxis, the cycle of contemplation put into action. The vocation of return constellates a personality who becomes a living expression of the struggle to contain the opposites, and who draws closer to the center through tethering to its periphery.

The constellation of the Self is redemptive, not just for the individual, but for the entire collective. The transformation and redemption of the Church depends on the work of the individual who is no longer contained by the Church, but becomes the container. Rather than the Church existing for the redemption of the sinner, the individual returns and belongs for the redemption of the Church. The struggle and suffering of homecoming is largely due to the difficulty of being tethered to a collective that has moved away from its own mythology. Afraid of wholeness, the Church proclaims Christ but as an institution is terrified of the Christ mystery. Yet as the Church is formed around a numinous experience of the Christ archetype, it exists to preserve the value and the meaning of that experience. Its authentic life depends on relationship to the original revelation, which is ultimately lived through the individual.
<<<
/***
|''Name:''|YourSearchPlugin|
|''Version:''|2.1.1 (2007-03-11)|
|''Source:''|http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/#YourSearchPlugin ([[del.icio.us|http://del.icio.us/post?url=http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/index.html%23YourSearchPlugin]])|
|''Author:''|UdoBorkowski (ub [at] abego-software [dot] de)|
|''Licence:''|[[BSD open source license (abego Software)|http://www.abego-software.de/legal/apl-v10.html]]|
|''Copyright:''|&copy; 2005-2006 [[abego Software|http://www.abego-software.de]]|
|''~CoreVersion:''|2.1.0|
|''Browser:''|Firefox 1.0.4+; Firefox 1.5; ~InternetExplorer 6.0|
!About YourSearch
YourSearch gives you a bunch of new features to simplify and speed up your daily searches in TiddlyWiki. It seamlessly integrates into the standard TiddlyWiki search: just start typing into the 'search' field and explore!

For more information see [[Help|YourSearch Help]].
!Compatibility
This plugin requires TiddlyWiki 2.1. 
Check the [[archive|http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/archive]] for ~YourSearchPlugins supporting older versions of TiddlyWiki.
!Source Code
***/
/***
This plugin's source code is compressed (and hidden). Use this [[link|http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/archive/YourSearchPlugin/Plugin-YourSearch-src.2.1.1.js]] to get the readable source code.
***/
///%
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abego.BoolExp(_6c,abego.parseTiddlerFilterTerm,{defaultFields:_6f,caseSensitive:_6d,withExtendedFields:_70});}this.getQueryText=function(){return _6c;};this.getUseRegExp=function(){return _6e;};this.getCaseSensitive=function(){return _6d;};this.getDefaultFields=function(){return _6f;};this.getWithExtendedFields=function(){return _70;};};abego.TiddlerQuery.prototype.test=function(_71){if(!_71){return false;}if(this.regExp){return this.tester.test(_71);}return this.expr.exec(_71);};abego.TiddlerQuery.prototype.filter=function(_72){return abego.select(_72,this.test,this);};abego.TiddlerQuery.prototype.getMarkRegExp=function(){if(this.regExp){return "".search(this.regExp)>=0?null:this.regExp;}return this.expr.getMarkRegExp();};abego.TiddlerQuery.prototype.toString=function(){return (this.regExp?this.regExp:this.expr).toString();};abego.PageWiseRenderer=function(){this.firstIndexOnPage=0;};merge(abego.PageWiseRenderer.prototype,{setItems:function(_73){this.items=_73;this.setFirstIndexOnPage(0);},getMaxPagesInNavigation:function(){return 10;},getItemsCount:function(_74){return this.items?this.items.length:0;},getCurrentPageIndex:function(){return Math.floor(this.firstIndexOnPage/this.getItemsPerPage());},getLastPageIndex:function(){return Math.floor((this.getItemsCount()-1)/this.getItemsPerPage());},setFirstIndexOnPage:function(_75){this.firstIndexOnPage=Math.min(Math.max(0,_75),this.getItemsCount()-1);},getFirstIndexOnPage:function(){this.firstIndexOnPage=Math.floor(this.firstIndexOnPage/this.getItemsPerPage())*this.getItemsPerPage();return this.firstIndexOnPage;},getLastIndexOnPage:function(){return Math.min(this.getFirstIndexOnPage()+this.getItemsPerPage()-1,this.getItemsCount()-1);},onPageChanged:function(_76,_77){},renderPage:function(_78){if(_78.beginRendering){_78.beginRendering(this);}try{if(this.getItemsCount()){var _79=this.getLastIndexOnPage();var _7a=-1;for(var i=this.getFirstIndexOnPage();i<=_79;i++){_7a++;_78.render(this,this.items[i],i,_7a);}}}finally{if(_78.endRendering){_78.endRendering(this);}}},addPageNavigation:function(_7c){if(!this.getItemsCount()){return;}var _7d=this;var _7e=function(e){if(!e){var e=window.event;}var _81=abego.toInt(this.getAttribute("page"),0);var _82=_7d.getCurrentPageIndex();if(_81==_82){return;}var _83=_81*_7d.getItemsPerPage();_7d.setFirstIndexOnPage(_83);_7d.onPageChanged(_81,_82);};var _84;var _85=this.getCurrentPageIndex();var _86=this.getLastPageIndex();if(_85>0){_84=createTiddlyButton(_7c,"Previous","Go to previous page (Shortcut: Alt-'<')",_7e,"prev");_84.setAttribute("page",(_85-1).toString());_84.setAttribute("accessKey","<");}for(var i=-this.getMaxPagesInNavigation();i<this.getMaxPagesInNavigation();i++){var _88=_85+i;if(_88<0){continue;}if(_88>_86){break;}var _89=(i+_85+1).toString();var _8a=_88==_85?"currentPage":"otherPage";_84=createTiddlyButton(_7c,_89,"Go to page %0".format([_89]),_7e,_8a);_84.setAttribute("page",(_88).toString());}if(_85<_86){_84=createTiddlyButton(_7c,"Next","Go to next page (Shortcut: Alt-'>')",_7e,"next");_84.setAttribute("page",(_85+1).toString());_84.setAttribute("accessKey",">");}}});abego.LimitedTextRenderer=function(){var _8b=40;var _8c=4;var _8d=function(_8e,_8f,_90){var n=_8e.length;if(n==0){_8e.push({start:_8f,end:_90});return;}var i=0;for(;i<n;i++){var _93=_8e[i];if(_93.start<=_90&&_8f<=_93.end){var r;var _95=i+1;for(;_95<n;_95++){r=_8e[_95];if(r.start>_90||_8f>_93.end){break;}}var _96=_8f;var _97=_90;for(var j=i;j<_95;j++){r=_8e[j];_96=Math.min(_96,r.start);_97=Math.max(_97,r.end);}_8e.splice(i,_95-i,{start:_96,end:_97});return;}if(_93.start>_90){break;}}_8e.splice(i,0,{start:_8f,end:_90});};var _99=function(_9a){var _9b=0;for(var i=0;i<_9a.length;i++){var _9d=_9a[i];_9b+=_9d.end-_9d.start;}return _9b;};var _9e=function(c){return (c>="a"&&c<="z")||(c>="A"&&c<="Z")||c=="_";};var _a0=function(s,_a2){if(!_9e(s[_a2])){return null;}for(var i=_a2-1;i>=0&&_9e(s[i]);i--){}var _a4=i+1;var n=s.length;for(i=_a2+1;i<n&&_9e(s[i]);i++){}return {start:_a4,end:i};};var _a6=function(s,_a8,_a9){var _aa;if(_a9){_aa=_a0(s,_a8);}else{if(_a8<=0){return _a8;}_aa=_a0(s,_a8-1);}if(!_aa){return _a8;}if(_a9){if(_aa.start>=_a8-_8c){return _aa.start;}if(_aa.end<=_a8+_8c){return _aa.end;}}else{if(_aa.end<=_a8+_8c){return _aa.end;}if(_aa.start>=_a8-_8c){return _aa.start;}}return _a8;};var _ab=function(s,_ad){var _ae=[];if(_ad){var _af=0;var n=s.length;var _b1=0;do{_ad.lastIndex=_af;var _b2=_ad.exec(s);if(_b2){if(_af<_b2.index){var t=s.substring(_af,_b2.index);_ae.push({text:t});}_ae.push({text:_b2[0],isMatch:true});_af=_b2.index+_b2[0].length;}else{_ae.push({text:s.substr(_af)});break;}}while(true);}else{_ae.push({text:s});}return _ae;};var _b4=function(_b5){var _b6=0;for(var i=0;i<_b5.length;i++){if(_b5[i].isMatch){_b6++;}}return _b6;};var _b8=function(s,_ba,_bb,_bc,_bd){var _be=Math.max(Math.floor(_bd/(_bc+1)),_8b);var _bf=Math.max(_be-(_bb-_ba),0);var _c0=Math.min(Math.floor(_bb+_bf/3),s.length);var _c1=Math.max(_c0-_be,0);_c1=_a6(s,_c1,true);_c0=_a6(s,_c0,false);return {start:_c1,end:_c0};};var _c2=function(_c3,s,_c5){var _c6=[];var _c7=_b4(_c3);var pos=0;for(var i=0;i<_c3.length;i++){var t=_c3[i];var _cb=t.text;if(t.isMatch){var _cc=_b8(s,pos,pos+_cb.length,_c7,_c5);_8d(_c6,_cc.start,_cc.end);}pos+=_cb.length;}return _c6;};var _cd=function(s,_cf,_d0){var _d1=_d0-_99(_cf);while(_d1>0){if(_cf.length==0){_8d(_cf,0,_a6(s,_d0,false));return;}else{var _d2=_cf[0];var _d3;var _d4;if(_d2.start==0){_d3=_d2.end;if(_cf.length>1){_d4=_cf[1].start;}else{_8d(_cf,_d3,_a6(s,_d3+_d1,false));return;}}else{_d3=0;_d4=_d2.start;}var _d5=Math.min(_d4,_d3+_d1);_8d(_cf,_d3,_d5);_d1-=(_d5-_d3);}}};var _d6=function(_d7,s,_d9,_da,_db){if(_da.length==0){return;}var _dc=function(_dd,s,_df,_e0,_e1){var t;var _e3;var pos=0;var i=0;var _e6=0;for(;i<_df.length;i++){t=_df[i];_e3=t.text;if(_e0<pos+_e3.length){_e6=_e0-pos;break;}pos+=_e3.length;}var _e7=_e1-_e0;for(;i<_df.length&&_e7>0;i++){t=_df[i];_e3=t.text.substr(_e6);_e6=0;if(_e3.length>_e7){_e3=_e3.substr(0,_e7);}if(t.isMatch){createTiddlyElement(_dd,"span",null,"marked",_e3);}else{createTiddlyText(_dd,_e3);}_e7-=_e3.length;}if(_e1<s.length){abego.createEllipsis(_dd);}};if(_da[0].start>0){abego.createEllipsis(_d7);}var _e8=_db;for(var i=0;i<_da.length&&_e8>0;i++){var _ea=_da[i];var len=Math.min(_ea.end-_ea.start,_e8);_dc(_d7,s,_d9,_ea.start,_ea.start+len);_e8-=len;}};this.render=function(_ec,s,_ee,_ef){if(s.length<_ee){_ee=s.length;}var _f0=_ab(s,_ef);var _f1=_c2(_f0,s,_ee);_cd(s,_f1,_ee);_d6(_ec,s,_f0,_f1,_ee);};};(function(){function alertAndThrow(msg){alert(msg);throw msg;}if(version.major<2||(version.major==2&&version.minor<1)){alertAndThrow("YourSearchPlugin requires TiddlyWiki 2.1 or newer.\n\nCheck the archive for YourSearch plugins\nsupporting older versions of TiddlyWiki.\n\nArchive: http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/archive");}abego.YourSearch={};var _f3;var _f4;var _f5=function(_f6){_f3=_f6;};var _f7=function(){return _f3?_f3:[];};var _f8=function(){return _f3?_f3.length:0;};var _f9=4;var _fa=10;var _fb=2;var _fc=function(s,re){var m=s.match(re);return m?m.length:0;};var _100=function(_101,_102){var _103=_102.getMarkRegExp();if(!_103){return 1;}var _104=_101.title.match(_103);var _105=_104?_104.length:0;var _106=_fc(_101.getTags(),_103);var _107=_104?_104.join("").length:0;var _108=_101.title.length>0?_107/_101.title.length:0;var rank=_105*_f9+_106*_fb+_108*_fa+1;return rank;};var _10a=function(_10b,_10c,_10d,_10e,_10f,_110){_f4=null;var _111=_10b.reverseLookup("tags",_110,false);try{var _112=[];if(config.options.chkSearchInTitle){_112.push("title");}if(config.options.chkSearchInText){_112.push("text");}if(config.options.chkSearchInTags){_112.push("tags");}_f4=new abego.TiddlerQuery(_10c,_10d,_10e,_112,config.options.chkSearchExtendedFields);}catch(e){return [];}var _113=_f4.filter(_111);var _114=abego.YourSearch.getRankFunction();for(var i=0;i<_113.length;i++){var _116=_113[i];var rank=_114(_116,_f4);_116.searchRank=rank;}if(!_10f){_10f="title";}var _118=function(a,b){var _11b=a.searchRank-b.searchRank;if(_11b==0){if(a[_10f]==b[_10f]){return (0);}else{return (a[_10f]<b[_10f])?-1:+1;}}else{return (_11b>0)?-1:+1;}};_113.sort(_118);return _113;};var _11c=80;var _11d=50;var _11e=250;var _11f=50;var _120=25;var _121=10;var _122="yourSearchResult";var _123="yourSearchResultItems";var _124;var _125;var _126;var _127;var _128;var _129=function(){if(version.extensions.YourSearchPlugin.styleSheetInited){return;}version.extensions.YourSearchPlugin.styleSheetInited=true;setStylesheet(store.getTiddlerText("YourSearchStyleSheet"),"yourSearch");};var _12a=function(){return _125!=null&&_125.parentNode==document.body;};var _12b=function(){if(_12a()){document.body.removeChild(_125);}};var _12c=function(e){_12b();var _12e=this.getAttribute("tiddlyLink");if(_12e){var _12f=this.getAttribute("withHilite");var _130=highlightHack;if(_12f&&_12f=="true"&&_f4){highlightHack=_f4.getMarkRegExp();}story.displayTiddler(this,_12e);highlightHack=_130;}return (false);};var _131=function(){if(!_126){return;}var root=_126;var _133=findPosX(root);var _134=findPosY(root);var _135=root.offsetHeight;var _136=_133;var _137=_134+_135;var _138=findWindowWidth();if(_138<_125.offsetWidth){_125.style.width=(_138-100)+"px";_138=findWindowWidth();}var _139=_125.offsetWidth;if(_136+_139>_138){_136=_138-_139-30;}if(_136<0){_136=0;}_125.style.left=_136+"px";_125.style.top=_137+"px";_125.style.display="block";};var _13a=function(){if(_125){window.scrollTo(0,ensureVisible(_125));}if(_126){window.scrollTo(0,ensureVisible(_126));}};var _13b=function(){_131();_13a();};var _13c;var _13d;var _13e=new abego.PageWiseRenderer();var _13f=function(_140){this.itemHtml=store.getTiddlerText("YourSearchItemTemplate");if(!this.itemHtml){alertAndThrow("YourSearchItemTemplate not found");}this.place=document.getElementById(_123);if(!this.place){this.place=createTiddlyElement(_140,"div",_123);}};merge(_13f.prototype,{render:function(_141,_142,_143,_144){_13c=_144;_13d=_142;var item=createTiddlyElement(this.place,"div",null,"yourSearchItem");item.innerHTML=this.itemHtml;applyHtmlMacros(item,null);refreshElements(item,null);},endRendering:function(_146){_13d=null;}});var _147=function(){if(!_125||!_126){return;}var html=store.getTiddlerText("YourSearchResultTemplate");if(!html){html="<b>Tiddler YourSearchResultTemplate not found</b>";}_125.innerHTML=html;applyHtmlMacros(_125,null);refreshElements(_125,null);var _149=new _13f(_125);_13e.renderPage(_149);_13b();};_13e.getItemsPerPage=function(){var n=(config.options.chkPreviewText)?abego.toInt(config.options.txtItemsPerPageWithPreview,_121):abego.toInt(config.options.txtItemsPerPage,_120);return (n>0)?n:1;};_13e.onPageChanged=function(){_147();};var _14b=function(){if(_126==null||!config.options.chkUseYourSearch){return;}if((_126.value==_124)&&_124&&!_12a()){if(_125&&(_125.parentNode!=document.body)){document.body.appendChild(_125);_13b();}else{abego.YourSearch.onShowResult(true);}}};var _14c=function(){_12b();_125=null;_124=null;};var _14d=function(self,e){while(e!=null){if(self==e){return true;}e=e.parentNode;}return false;};var _150=function(e){if(e.target==_126){return;}if(e.target==_127){return;}if(_125&&_14d(_125,e.target)){return;}_12b();};var _152=function(e){if(e.keyCode==27){_12b();}};addEvent(document,"click",_150);addEvent(document,"keyup",_152);var _154=function(text,_156,_157){_124=text;_f5(_10a(store,text,_156,_157,"title","excludeSearch"));abego.YourSearch.onShowResult();};var _158=function(_159,_15a,_15b,_15c,_15d,_15e){_129();_124="";var _15f=null;var _160=function(txt){if(config.options.chkUseYourSearch){_154(txt.value,config.options.chkCaseSensitiveSearch,config.options.chkRegExpSearch);}else{story.search(txt.value,config.options.chkCaseSensitiveSearch,config.options.chkRegExpSearch);}_124=txt.value;};var _162=function(e){_160(_126);return false;};var _164=function(e){if(!e){var e=window.event;}_126=this;switch(e.keyCode){case 13:if(e.ctrlKey&&_128&&_12a()){_128.onclick.apply(_128,[e]);}else{_160(this);}break;case 27:if(_12a()){_12b();}else{this.value="";clearMessage();}break;}if(String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode)==this.accessKey||e.altKey){_14b();}if(this.value.length<3&&_15f){clearTimeout(_15f);}if(this.value.length>2){if(this.value!=_124){if(!config.options.chkUseYourSearch||config.options.chkSearchAsYouType){if(_15f){clearTimeout(_15f);}var txt=this;_15f=setTimeout(function(){_160(txt);},500);}}else{if(_15f){clearTimeout(_15f);}}}if(this.value.length==0){_12b();}};var _168=function(e){this.select();clearMessage();_14b();};var args=_15d.parseParams("list",null,true);var _16b=getFlag(args,"buttonAtRight");var _16c=getParam(args,"sizeTextbox",this.sizeTextbox);var btn;if(!_16b){btn=createTiddlyButton(_159,this.label,this.prompt,_162);}var txt=createTiddlyElement(_159,"input",null,null,null);if(_15b[0]){txt.value=_15b[0];}txt.onkeyup=_164;txt.onfocus=_168;txt.setAttribute("size",_16c);txt.setAttribute("accessKey",this.accessKey);txt.setAttribute("autocomplete","off");if(config.browser.isSafari){txt.setAttribute("type","search");txt.setAttribute("results","5");}else{txt.setAttribute("type","text");}if(_16b){btn=createTiddlyButton(_159,this.label,this.prompt,_162);}_126=txt;_127=btn;};var _16f=function(){_12b();var _170=_f7();var n=_170.length;if(n){var _172=[];for(var i=0;i<n;i++){_172.push(_170[i].title);}story.displayTiddlers(null,_172);}};var _174=function(_175,_176,_177,_178){invokeMacro(_175,"option",_176,_177,_178);var elem=_175.lastChild;var _17a=elem.onclick;elem.onclick=function(e){var _17c=_17a.apply(this,arguments);_147();return _17c;};return elem;};var _17d=function(s){var _17f=["''","{{{","}}}","//","<<<","/***","***/"];var _180="";for(var i=0;i<_17f.length;i++){if(i!=0){_180+="|";}_180+="("+_17f[i].escapeRegExp()+")";}return s.replace(new RegExp(_180,"mg"),"").trim();};var _182=function(){var i=_13c;return (i>=0&&i<=9)?(i<9?(i+1):0):-1;};var _184=new abego.LimitedTextRenderer();var _185=function(_186,s,_188){_184.render(_186,s,_188,_f4.getMarkRegExp());};var _189=TiddlyWiki.prototype.saveTiddler;TiddlyWiki.prototype.saveTiddler=function(_18a,_18b,_18c,_18d,_18e,tags,_190){_189.apply(this,arguments);_14c();};var _191=TiddlyWiki.prototype.removeTiddler;TiddlyWiki.prototype.removeTiddler=function(_192){_191.apply(this,arguments);_14c();};config.macros.yourSearch={label:"yourSearch",prompt:"Gives access to the current/last YourSearch result",handler:function(_193,_194,_195,_196,_197,_198){if(_195.length==0){return;}var name=_195[0];var func=config.macros.yourSearch.funcs[name];if(func){func(_193,_194,_195,_196,_197,_198);}},tests:{"true":function(){return true;},"false":function(){return false;},"found":function(){return _f8()>0;},"previewText":function(){return config.options.chkPreviewText;}},funcs:{itemRange:function(_19b){if(_f8()){var _19c=_13e.getLastIndexOnPage();var s="%0 - %1".format([_13e.getFirstIndexOnPage()+1,_19c+1]);createTiddlyText(_19b,s);}},count:function(_19e){createTiddlyText(_19e,_f8().toString());},query:function(_19f){if(_f4){createTiddlyText(_19f,_f4.toString());}},version:function(_1a0){var t="YourSearch %0.%1.%2".format([version.extensions.YourSearchPlugin.major,version.extensions.YourSearchPlugin.minor,version.extensions.YourSearchPlugin.revision]);var e=createTiddlyElement(_1a0,"a");e.setAttribute("href","http://tiddlywiki.abego-software.de/#YourSearchPlugin");e.innerHTML="<font color=\"black\" face=\"Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif\">"+t+"<font>";},copyright:function(_1a3){var e=createTiddlyElement(_1a3,"a");e.setAttribute("href","http://www.abego-software.de");e.innerHTML="<font color=\"black\" face=\"Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif\">&copy; 2005-2006 <b><font color=\"red\">abego</font></b> Software<font>";},newTiddlerButton:function(_1a5){if(_f4){var r=abego.parseNewTiddlerCommandLine(_f4.getQueryText());var btn=config.macros.newTiddler.createNewTiddlerButton(_1a5,r.title,r.params,"new tiddler","Create a new tiddler based on search text. (Shortcut: Ctrl-Enter; Separators: '.', '#')",null,"text");var _1a8=btn.onclick;btn.onclick=function(){_12b();_1a8.apply(this,arguments);};_128=btn;}},linkButton:function(_1a9,_1aa,_1ab,_1ac,_1ad,_1ae){if(_1ab<2){return;}var _1af=_1ab[1];var text=_1ab<3?_1af:_1ab[2];var _1b1=_1ab<4?text:_1ab[3];var _1b2=_1ab<5?null:_1ab[4];var btn=createTiddlyButton(_1a9,text,_1b1,_12c,null,null,_1b2);btn.setAttribute("tiddlyLink",_1af);},closeButton:function(_1b4,_1b5,_1b6,_1b7,_1b8,_1b9){var _1ba=createTiddlyButton(_1b4,"close","Close the Search Results (Shortcut: ESC)",_12b);},openAllButton:function(_1bb,_1bc,_1bd,_1be,_1bf,_1c0){var n=_f8();if(n==0){return;}var _1c2=n==1?"open tiddler":"open all %0 tiddlers".format([n]);var _1c3=createTiddlyButton(_1bb,_1c2,"Open all found tiddlers (Shortcut: Alt-O)",_16f);_1c3.setAttribute("accessKey","O");},naviBar:function(_1c4,_1c5,_1c6,_1c7,_1c8,_1c9){_13e.addPageNavigation(_1c4);},"if":function(_1ca,_1cb,_1cc,_1cd,_1ce,_1cf){if(_1cc.length<2){return;}var _1d0=_1cc[1];var _1d1=(_1d0=="not");if(_1d1){if(_1cc.length<3){return;}_1d0=_1cc[2];}var test=config.macros.yourSearch.tests[_1d0];var _1d3=false;try{if(test){_1d3=test(_1ca,_1cb,_1cc,_1cd,_1ce,_1cf)!=_1d1;}else{_1d3=(!eval(_1d0))==_1d1;}}catch(ex){}if(!_1d3){_1ca.style.display="none";}},chkPreviewText:function(_1d4,_1d5,_1d6,_1d7,_1d8,_1d9){var _1da=_1d6.slice(1).join(" ");var elem=_174(_1d4,"chkPreviewText",_1d7,_1d9);elem.setAttribute("accessKey","P");elem.title="Show text preview of found tiddlers (Shortcut: Alt-P)";return elem;}}};config.macros.foundTiddler={label:"foundTiddler",prompt:"Provides information on the tiddler currently processed on the YourSearch result page",handler:function(_1dc,_1dd,_1de,_1df,_1e0,_1e1){var name=_1de[0];var func=config.macros.foundTiddler.funcs[name];if(func){func(_1dc,_1dd,_1de,_1df,_1e0,_1e1);}},funcs:{title:function(_1e4,_1e5,_1e6,_1e7,_1e8,_1e9){if(!_13d){return;}var _1ea=_182();var _1eb=_1ea>=0?"Open tiddler (Shortcut: Alt-%0)".format([_1ea.toString()]):"Open tiddler";var btn=createTiddlyButton(_1e4,null,_1eb,_12c,null);btn.setAttribute("tiddlyLink",_13d.title);btn.setAttribute("withHilite","true");_185(btn,_13d.title,_11c);if(_1ea>=0){btn.setAttribute("accessKey",_1ea.toString());}},tags:function(_1ed,_1ee,_1ef,_1f0,_1f1,_1f2){if(!_13d){return;}_185(_1ed,_13d.getTags(),_11d);},text:function(_1f3,_1f4,_1f5,_1f6,_1f7,_1f8){if(!_13d){return;}_185(_1f3,_17d(_13d.text),_11e);},field:function(_1f9,_1fa,_1fb,_1fc,_1fd,_1fe){if(!_13d){return;}var name=_1fb[1];var len=_1fb.length>2?abego.toInt(_1fb[2],_11f):_11f;var v=store.getValue(_13d,name);if(v){_185(_1f9,_17d(v),len);}},number:function(_202,_203,_204,_205,_206,_207){var _208=_182();if(_208>=0){var text="%0)".format([_208.toString()]);createTiddlyElement(_202,"span",null,"shortcutNumber",text);}}}};var opts={chkUseYourSearch:true,chkPreviewText:true,chkSearchAsYouType:true,chkSearchInTitle:true,chkSearchInText:true,chkSearchInTags:true,chkSearchExtendedFields:true,txtItemsPerPage:_120,txtItemsPerPageWithPreview:_121};for(var n in opts){if(config.options[n]==undefined){config.options[n]=opts[n];}}config.shadowTiddlers.AdvancedOptions+="\n<<option chkUseYourSearch>> Use 'Your Search' //([[more options|YourSearch Options]]) ([[help|YourSearch Help]])// ";config.shadowTiddlers["YourSearch Help"]="!Field Search\nWith the Field Search you can restrict your search to certain fields of a tiddler, e.g"+" only search the tags or only the titles. The general form is //fieldname//'':''//textToSearch// (e."+"g. {{{title:intro}}}). In addition one-character shortcuts are also supported for the standard field"+"s {{{title}}}, {{{text}}} and {{{tags}}}:\n|!What you want|!What you type|!Example|\n|Search ''titles "+"only''|start word with ''!''|{{{!jonny}}} (shortcut for {{{title:jonny}}})|\n|Search ''contents/text "+"only''|start word with ''%''|{{{%football}}} (shortcut for {{{text:football}}})|\n|Search ''tags only"+"''|start word with ''#''|{{{#Plugin}}} (shortcut for {{{tags:Plugin}}})|\n\nUsing this feature you may"+" also search the extended fields (\"Metadata\") introduced with TiddlyWiki 2.1, e.g. use {{{priority:1"+"}}} to find all tiddlers with the priority field set to \"1\".\n\nYou may search a word in more than one"+" field. E.g. {{{!#Plugin}}} (or {{{title:tags:Plugin}}} in the \"long form\") finds tiddlers containin"+"g \"Plugin\" either in the title or in the tags (but does not look for \"Plugin\" in the text). \n\n!Boole"+"an Search\nThe Boolean Search is useful when searching for multiple words.\n|!What you want|!What you "+"type|!Example|\n|''All words'' must exist|List of words|{{{jonny jeremy}}} (or {{{jonny and jeremy}}}"+")|\n|''At least one word'' must exist|Separate words by ''or''|{{{jonny or jeremy}}}|\n|A word ''must "+"not exist''|Start word with ''-''|{{{-jonny}}} (or {{{not jonny}}})|\n\n''Note:'' When you specify two"+" words, separated with a space, YourSearch finds all tiddlers that contain both words, but not neces"+"sarily next to each other. If you want to find a sequence of word, e.g. '{{{John Brown}}}', you need"+" to put the words into quotes. I.e. you type: {{{\"john brown\"}}}.\n\nUsing parenthesis you may change "+"the default \"left to right\" evaluation of the boolean search. E.g. {{{not (jonny or jeremy)}}} finds"+" all tiddlers that contain neither \"jonny\" nor \"jeremy. In contrast to this {{{not jonny or jeremy}}"+"} (i.e. without parenthesis) finds all tiddlers that either don't contain \"jonny\" or that contain \"j"+"eremy\".\n\n!'Exact Word' Search\nBy default a search result all matches that 'contain' the searched tex"+"t. E.g. if you search for {{{Task}}} you will get all tiddlers containing 'Task', but also '~Complet"+"edTask', '~TaskForce' etc.\n\nIf you only want to get the tiddlers that contain 'exactly the word' you"+" need to prefix it with a '='. E.g. typing '=Task' will find the tiddlers that contain the word 'Tas"+"k', ignoring words that just contain 'Task' as a substring.\n\n!~CaseSensitiveSearch and ~RegExpSearch"+"\nThe standard search options ~CaseSensitiveSearch and ~RegExpSearch are fully supported by YourSearc"+"h. However when ''~RegExpSearch'' is on Filtered and Boolean Search are disabled.\n\nIn addition you m"+"ay do a \"regular expression\" search even with the ''~RegExpSearch'' set to false by directly enterin"+"g the regular expression into the search field, framed with {{{/.../}}}. \n\nExample: {{{/m[ae][iy]er/"+"}}} will find all tiddlers that contain either \"maier\", \"mayer\", \"meier\" or \"meyer\".\n\n!~JavaScript E"+"xpression Filtering\nIf you are familiar with JavaScript programming and know some TiddlyWiki interna"+"ls you may also use JavaScript expression for the search. Just enter a JavaScript boolean expression"+" into the search field, framed with {{{ { ... } }}}. In the code refer to the variable tiddler and e"+"valuate to {{{true}}} when the given tiddler should be included in the result. \n\nExample: {{{ { tidd"+"ler.modified > new Date(\"Jul 4, 2005\")} }}} returns all tiddler modified after July 4th, 2005.\n\n!Com"+"bined Search\nYou are free to combine the various search options. \n\n''Examples''\n|!What you type|!Res"+"ult|\n|{{{!jonny !jeremy -%football}}}|all tiddlers with both {{{jonny}}} and {{{jeremy}}} in its tit"+"les, but no {{{football}}} in content.|\n|{{{#=Task}}}|All tiddlers tagged with 'Task' (the exact wor"+"d). Tags named '~CompletedTask', '~TaskForce' etc. are not considered.|\n\n!Access Keys\nYou are encour"+"aged to use the access keys (also called \"shortcut\" keys) for the most frequently used operations. F"+"or quick reference these shortcuts are also mentioned in the tooltip for the various buttons etc.\n\n|"+"!Key|!Operation|\n|{{{Alt-F}}}|''The most important keystroke'': It moves the cursor to the search in"+"put field so you can directly start typing your query. Pressing {{{Alt-F}}} will also display the pr"+"evious search result. This way you can quickly display multiple tiddlers using \"Press {{{Alt-F}}}. S"+"elect tiddler.\" sequences.|\n|{{{ESC}}}|Closes the [[YourSearch Result]]. When the [[YourSearch Resul"+"t]] is already closed and the cursor is in the search input field the field's content is cleared so "+"you start a new query.|\n|{{{Alt-1}}}, {{{Alt-2}}},... |Pressing these keys opens the first, second e"+"tc. tiddler from the result list.|\n|{{{Alt-O}}}|Opens all found tiddlers.|\n|{{{Alt-P}}}|Toggles the "+"'Preview Text' mode.|\n|{{{Alt-'<'}}}, {{{Alt-'>'}}}|Displays the previous or next page in the [[Your"+"Search Result]].|\n|{{{Return}}}|When you have turned off the 'as you type' search mode pressing the "+"{{{Return}}} key actually starts the search (as does pressing the 'search' button).|\n\n//If some of t"+"hese shortcuts don't work for you check your browser if you have other extensions installed that alr"+"eady \"use\" these shortcuts.//";config.shadowTiddlers["YourSearch Options"]="|>|!YourSearch Options|\n|>|<<option chkUseYourSearch>> Use 'Your Search'|\n|!|<<option chkPreviewText"+">> Show Text Preview|\n|!|<<option chkSearchAsYouType>> 'Search As You Type' Mode (No RETURN required"+" to start search)|\n|!|Default Search Filter:<<option chkSearchInTitle>>Title ('!')     <<option chk"+"SearchInText>>Text ('%')     <<option chkSearchInTags>>Tags ('#')    <<option chkSearchExtendedFiel"+"ds>>Extended Fields<html><br><font size=\"-2\">The fields of a tiddlers that are searched when you don"+"'t explicitly specify a filter in the search text <br>(Explictly specify fields using one or more '!"+"', '%', '#' or 'fieldname:' prefix before the word/text to find).</font></html>|\n|!|Number of items "+"on search result page: <<option txtItemsPerPage>>|\n|!|Number of items on search result page with pre"+"view text: <<option txtItemsPerPageWithPreview>>|\n";config.shadowTiddlers["YourSearchStyleSheet"]="/***\n!~YourSearchResult Stylesheet\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.yourSearchResult {\n\tposition: absolute;\n\twidth: 800"+"px;\n\n\tpadding: 0.2em;\n\tlist-style: none;\n\tmargin: 0;\n\n\tbackground: #ffd;\n\tborder: 1px solid DarkGra"+"y;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!!Summary Section\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.yourSearchResult .summary {\n\tborder-bottom-width:"+" thin;\n\tborder-bottom-style: solid;\n\tborder-bottom-color: #999999;\n\tpadding-bottom: 4px;\n}\n\n.yourSea"+"rchRange, .yourSearchCount, .yourSearchQuery   {\n\tfont-weight: bold;\n}\n\n.yourSearchResult .summary ."+"button {\n\tfont-size: 10px;\n\n\tpadding-left: 0.3em;\n\tpadding-right: 0.3em;\n}\n\n.yourSearchResult .summa"+"ry .chkBoxLabel {\n\tfont-size: 10px;\n\n\tpadding-right: 0.3em;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!!Items Area\n***/\n/*{{{*"+"/\n.yourSearchResult .marked {\n\tbackground: none;\n\tfont-weight: bold;\n}\n\n.yourSearchItem {\n\tmargin-to"+"p: 2px;\n}\n\n.yourSearchNumber {\n\tcolor: #808080;\n}\n\n\n.yourSearchTags {\n\tcolor: #008000;\n}\n\n.yourSearc"+"hText {\n\tcolor: #808080;\n\tmargin-bottom: 6px;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!!Footer\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.yourSearchFoote"+"r {\n\tmargin-top: 8px;\n\tborder-top-width: thin;\n\tborder-top-style: solid;\n\tborder-top-color: #999999;"+"\n}\n\n.yourSearchFooter a:hover{\n\tbackground: none;\n\tcolor: none;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!!Navigation Bar\n***/"+"\n/*{{{*/\n.yourSearchNaviBar a {\n\tfont-size: 16px;\n\tmargin-left: 4px;\n\tmargin-right: 4px;\n\tcolor: bla"+"ck;\n\ttext-decoration: underline;\n}\n\n.yourSearchNaviBar a:hover {\n\tbackground-color: none;\n}\n\n.yourSe"+"archNaviBar .prev {\n\tfont-weight: bold;\n\tcolor: blue;\n}\n\n.yourSearchNaviBar .currentPage {\n\tcolor: #"+"FF0000;\n\tfont-weight: bold;\n\ttext-decoration: none;\n}\n\n.yourSearchNaviBar .next {\n\tfont-weight: bold"+";\n\tcolor: blue;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n";config.shadowTiddlers["YourSearchResultTemplate"]="<!--\n{{{\n-->\n<span macro=\"yourSearch if found\">\n<!-- The Summary Header ============================"+"================ -->\n<table class=\"summary\" border=\"0\" width=\"100%\" cellspacing=\"0\" cellpadding=\"0\">"+"<tbody>\n  <tr>\n\t<td align=\"left\">\n\t\tYourSearch Result <span class=\"yourSearchRange\" macro=\"yourSearc"+"h itemRange\"></span>\n\t\t&nbsp;of&nbsp;<span class=\"yourSearchCount\" macro=\"yourSearch count\"></span>\n"+"\t\tfor&nbsp;<span class=\"yourSearchQuery\" macro=\"yourSearch query\"></span>\n\t</td>\n\t<td class=\"yourSea"+"rchButtons\" align=\"right\">\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch chkPreviewText\"></span><span class=\"chkBoxLabel"+"\">preview text</span>\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch newTiddlerButton\"></span>\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch openAllButton\"></span>\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch lin"+"kButton 'YourSearch Options' options 'Configure YourSearch'\"></span>\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch linkB"+"utton 'YourSearch Help' help 'Get help how to use YourSearch'\"></span>\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch clo"+"seButton\"></span>\n\t</td>\n  </tr>\n</tbody></table>\n\n<!-- The List of Found Tiddlers ================="+"=========================== -->\n<div id=\"yourSearchResultItems\" itemsPerPage=\"25\" itemsPerPageWithPr"+"eview=\"10\"></div>\n\n<!-- The Footer (with the Navigation) ==========================================="+"= -->\n<table class=\"yourSearchFooter\" border=\"0\" width=\"100%\" cellspacing=\"0\" cellpadding=\"0\"><tbody"+">\n  <tr>\n\t<td align=\"left\">\n\t\tResult page: <span class=\"yourSearchNaviBar\" macro=\"yourSearch naviBar"+"\"></span>\n\t</td>\n\t<td align=\"right\"><span macro=\"yourSearch version\"></span>, <span macro=\"yourSearc"+"h copyright\"></span>\n\t</td>\n  </tr>\n</tbody></table>\n<!-- end of the 'tiddlers found' case ========="+"================================== -->\n</span>\n\n\n<!-- The \"No tiddlers found\" case ================="+"========================== -->\n<span macro=\"yourSearch if not found\">\n<table class=\"summary\" border="+"\"0\" width=\"100%\" cellspacing=\"0\" cellpadding=\"0\"><tbody>\n  <tr>\n\t<td align=\"left\">\n\t\tYourSearch Resu"+"lt: No tiddlers found for <span class=\"yourSearchQuery\" macro=\"yourSearch query\"></span>.\n\t</td>\n\t<t"+"d class=\"yourSearchButtons\" align=\"right\">\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch newTiddlerButton\"></span>\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch linkButton 'YourSearch Options'"+" options 'Configure YourSearch'\"></span>\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch linkButton 'YourSearch Help' help"+" 'Get help how to use YourSearch'\"></span>\n\t\t<span macro=\"yourSearch closeButton\"></span>\n\t</td>\n  <"+"/tr>\n</tbody></table>\n</span>\n\n\n<!--\n}}}\n-->\n";config.shadowTiddlers["YourSearchItemTemplate"]="<!--\n{{{\n-->\n<span class='yourSearchNumber' macro='foundTiddler number'></span>\n<span class='yourSea"+"rchTitle' macro='foundTiddler title'/></span>&nbsp;-&nbsp;\n<span class='yourSearchTags' macro='found"+"Tiddler field tags 50'/></span>\n<span macro=\"yourSearch if previewText\"><div class='yourSearchText' macro='fo"+"undTiddler field text 250'/></div></span>\n<!--\n}}}\n-->";config.shadowTiddlers["YourSearch"]="<<tiddler [[YourSearch Help]]>>";config.shadowTiddlers["YourSearch Result"]="The popup-like window displaying the result of a YourSearch query.";config.macros.search.handler=_158;var _20c=function(){if(config.macros.search.handler!=_158){alert("Message from YourSearchPlugin:\n\n\nAnother plugin has disabled the 'Your Search' features.\n\n\nYou may "+"disable the other plugin or change the load order of \nthe plugins (by changing the names of the tidd"+"lers)\nto enable the 'Your Search' features.");}};setTimeout(_20c,5000);abego.YourSearch.getStandardRankFunction=function(){return _100;};abego.YourSearch.getRankFunction=function(){return abego.YourSearch.getStandardRankFunction();};abego.YourSearch.getCurrentTiddler=function(){return _13d;};abego.YourSearch.closeResult=function(){_12b();};abego.YourSearch.getFoundTiddlers=function(){return _f3;};abego.YourSearch.getQuery=function(){return _f4;};abego.YourSearch.onShowResult=function(_20d){highlightHack=_f4?_f4.getMarkRegExp():null;if(!_20d){_13e.setItems(_f7());}if(!_125){_125=createTiddlyElement(document.body,"div",_122,"yourSearchResult");}else{if(_125.parentNode!=document.body){document.body.appendChild(_125);}}_147();highlightHack=null;};})();}
//%/
Amrhein, P. A. (2002). [[Vocation as Redemption: Returning to the Church as a Path of Individuation]].

Anissian, M. (2005). [[Eros in Sufism: Journey to Mystical Love]].

Avakian, P. D. (2006). [[Sister fire: Witnessing Armenian women's journey through dance]]. 

Ayres, J. (2005). [[Research as Fictional Act: Poetry, Method and Metaphor]].

Beloff, M. R.(2001). [[Archetypal Jewish divorce ritual (the Get): Witnessing the voices]].

Bogner, R. (2002). [[Places: An exploration of physical environments and their influence on intrapsychic processes]].

Bostock, C. (2004). [[Debio Tibi Nihil: Priapus, Homosexuality, and Archetypal Psychology]].

Brooks, A. H. (2007). [[Lure of desolate places]].

Callan, G. M. (2002). [[Temenos: The Primordial Vessel and the Mysteries of "9/11"]].

Chalquist, C. (2003). [[In The Shadow Of Cross And Sword: Imagining A Psychoanalysis Of Place]].

~Conlon-McIvor, M. (2004). [[Paradox Found: Depth Memoir as Quantum Coniunctio]].

Davidson, C. W. (2001). [[Reclaiming rites of a passage through ritual: Soulwork for midlife women]].

Davis, G. W. (2007). [[Unfinished heroes: The abandoned hero's journey of contemporary business leaders]].

Davin, A. C. (2003). [[In My Native Tongue: Reflections From the Shore of Spirit Lake]].

Denney, M. K. (2001). [[Body, soul, and medicine: Confessions of an elder physician]].

Feijoo, M. (2006). [[Listening to our children's voices: Abandonment, invisibility, and resilience in the lives of high poverty Hispanic drop outs]].

Freed, J. (2003). [[After Sex? A Study of Young Female Teens]].

~Gailor-Loflin, H. (2005). [[Imagining Leadership, Imagining Society: Pathways to Leadership Development in Social Change Organizations]].

~Ghammachi-Bennett, M. (2001). [[Blood psyche: Body, ancestry, and soul]].

Gilbert, K. L. (2006). [[The mermaid archetype]].

Gordon, R. L. (2004). [[The Murder of Spinoza and Other 17th-Century Alchemists: a Contemporary Look at a Long-ago Mortificatio Tale]].

Graham, V. B. (2006). [[Sandwerk as an Individual Spiritual Practice]].

Green, T. A. (2002). [[The Breath of Gaia: Environmental Illness as a vehicle to consciousness]].

Hale, C. A. (2006). [[Follow the red: Exploring the archetypal experience of color]].

Hart, M. (2001). [[The heart's cry for image: Painting and depth psychology]].

Harthcock, M. (2005). [[Caring as a subversive activity: A study in liberation pedagogy]].

Held, C. A. (2006). [[Horse girl: An archetypal study of women, horses, and trauma healing]].

Hiles, C. A. (2002). [[The night sea journey: Whale as symbol of transformation]].

Hull, J. W. (2003). [[The wilderness of belonging: A study of the transformative power of intentional community]].

Hunter, E. (2006). [[Beyond the shadows of cohousing: Cultivating idealism, identity, borders and trust]].

Irias, P. (2006). [[Unearthing the soul I left underneath a mango tree: A phenomenological exploration of the experiences of Nicaraguan refugees]]

Jaeggi, L. (2004). [[Revisiting a Home For the Heart: Bruno Bettelheim, the Orthogenic School and the Future of Milieu in Child Treatment]].

Jakala, R. E. (2006). [[The complex nature of secrets, the secret nature of complexes: An analysis of a secret keeper]].

Jones, P. F. (2004). [[City and Psyche: An Exploration into the Archetype of City]].

Keiller, B. B. (2002). [[Border psyche invites re-visioning: A depth psychological exploration of three contemporary borders]].

Killinger, J. E. (2006). [[Between the Frying Pan and the Fire: The Intermundia of Clergy Transitioning Out of Parish Ministry]].

La Salle, T. J. (2007) [[Awakening to ecocide]].

Laskowski, S. (2003). [[Incest: Symbol Formation, Integration, and Transformation]].

Lay, R. (2006). [[Exploring Subjectivity In the Work of Jung, Heidegger, and Corbin Through an Artistic Dialogue of Film]].

Lee, G. (2007). [[Excavating memories, reconstructing narratives: The Nikkei diaspora and the American transnational experience]].

Lin (2003). [[Psychological Forces Impinging Upon American CEOs and their Relationship with Archetypes]].

Lloyd, R. (2004). [[Mystica Communitas Toward a Gnostic Psychology of Individuation]].

~McEntire, S. D. (2005). [[Silence: A depth psychological exploration]]. 

~MacFarland, E. B. (2004). [[Discovering the healing power of Nature: A new perspective for healing the wounds of childhood abuse]].

~MacWilliams, D. L. (2002). [[Embodied dialogue with place: Intentional engagement of the world]].

Meek, E. A. (2005). [[Creative flooding]].

Meyer, R. M. (2005). [[Clio's Circle: Historians Who Dare to Embrace the Unconscious]].

Mercury, M. (2000). [[Pagan fleshworks: A depth psychological study of contemporary body modification]].

Miller, W. Z. (2002). [[The psyche-centered zone of peak performance: Depth psychology applied to golf]].

Mitchell, L. H. (2006). [[The eco-imaginal underpinnings of community identity in Harmony Grove Valley]].

Montgomery, G. A. (2001). [[Kali's follies: Midlife at the Millennium. Theatre as depth psychology praxis]].

Nelsen, M. J. (2004). [[Re-membering the Soul Through the Senses: Meditations, Reflections, and Reveries on The Lady and the Unicorn Tapestry]].

Nelson, E.E. (2002). [[Psyche's knife]].

Nishino, S. F. (2005). [[Rasputin: A psychobiography]].

Noriega, M. (2007). [[Timelessness]].

Oxford, T. (2004). [[Non-ordinary experiences of ordinary women: Initiation and individuation on the medicine path]].

Paul, S.V. (2003). [[Gypsy as symbol of soul and its exile]].

Perluss, E. A. (2004). [[Landscape Archetypes: Islands, Valleys, Mountains, and Deserts]].

Pohn, K. R. (2006). [[Playing the cosmic game: Exploring play's archetypal aspects through the kaleidoscope of culture]].

Poulsen, A. (2003). [[Soul Dancing: Individuation within Intimacy]].

Rodriguez, C. S. (2001). [[Dancing in the thresholds: Exploring the interactive field]].

Rose, A. A. (2001). [[The Storyteller's Journey]].

Rowe, J. B. (2006). [[The experience of mystery in enduring love: Embracing the soul of marriage]].

Selig, J. L. (2004). [[Cultural Therapy: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Work With the Soul of America]].

Sgarzi, J. A. (2003). [[In the labyrinth of secret: A meditation on the nature of secret]].

Shealy, P. (2003). [[Military brats/third culture kids: A phenomenological study of the effects of being raised in the military]].

Shine Duck, A. W. (2001). [[Ancestral echoes and modern voices: The family story of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings]].

Silberstein, J. (2006). [[An angel and her feather: How fact and fiction heal and explore the archetype of home]].

Smethers, J. (2003). [[Scumbag Sewer Rats: The Criminalized Male Drug Addict And The Trickster Archetype]].

Still, S. L. (2002). [[Dark Persephone: Soul's Descent to Eros]].

Stinchfield, J. (2006). [[This World Full of Grace: Living the Imaginal Into Everday Life]].

Stolz, D. E. (2006). [[I am not I: The many faces of psyche in the workplace]].

Tannen, R. L. (2002). [[The fictive-female sleuth: Mirro, myth, and metaphor]].

Tochluk, S. I. (2005). [[Friends, teachers, witnesses, healers: Whiteness and cross-race friendship]].

Todd, J. (2006). [[Grieving with the unborn]].

Tysinger, B. C. (2006). [[Return to Narcissus]].

Villarreal, S. (2004). [[Reshaping Cultural Identities: A Phenomenological Study of Eight Borderland Latinas]].

Wade, J. B. (2002). [[The voices within the anorexic]].

Ward, T. J. (2003). [[Reawakening Indigenous Sensibilities in the Western Psyche]].

Watson, R. T. (2002). [[Bad seed, bad blood: Queer transgression, death, and rebirth]].

Weitzel, T. L. (2006). [[Becoming alive: Individual and collective recovery in a multicultural church]].

Wielenga, L. M. (2002). [[Black teenage pregnancy and the divine child: A depth psychological approach to a cultural problem]].

Williams, C. P. (2003). [[Looking for Meaning in All the Wrong Places: A Depth Psychological Perspective on the Relationship Between Human Genome Science and the Human Psyche]].
''2007''
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''2006''
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''2005''
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''2004''
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''2003''
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''2002''
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''2001''
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''2000''
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<<forEachTiddler
where
      'tiddler.title.replace(/^(A|An|The) /,"").substr(0,1).toUpperCase()&& tiddler.tags.contains("Depth Psychology")'
   sortBy
 'tiddler.title.replace(/^(A|An|The) /,"").toUpperCase()'>>