Jim Kline

Jim Kline

Degrees

  • Ph.D., Psychology, Saybrook University

Jim earned his doctoral degree in psychology with a Jungian studies specialization from Saybrook University, San Francisco, and received an MFA in Creative Writing from Antioch University, Los Angeles. He has contributed articles on zombies, Orpheus, Anne Frank, and the archetypal dimension of silent era cinema to such publications as Spring Journal, The Portland Tribune, The San Francisco Jung Library Journal, and Psychological Perspectives. He is also the author of The Complete Films of Buster Keaton(1993). Dream analysis, cinema, consciousness, shamanism, the hero archetype, essay writing, and folklore and mythology are some of the topics and activities that are of interest to him. As an adjunct for Pacifica's Humanities program, Jim has taught courses in Jung and the Humanities, Joseph Campbell, and archetypal patterns in cinema. During his most recent professional position as Chair of the Languages and Humanities department of Northern Marianas College, located on the island of Saipan in the western Pacific, he expanded the department's course offerings by developing both in-class and online folklore and mythology classes, as well as creating an online general psychology course with an emphasis upon a humanistic and transpersonal approach to the study of psychology. He currently lives with his wife Beatriz and his four cats in southwest Washington. One of his favorite quotes from Jung appears in Symbols of Transformation: "…[The god] appears at first in hostile form, an assailant with whom the hero has to wrestle. This is in keeping with the violence of all unconscious dynamism. In this manner the god manifests himself and in this form he must be overcome….The onslaught of instinct then becomes an experience of divinity, provided that man does not succumb to it and follow it blindly, but defends his humanity against the animal nature of the divine power." [CW 5, para 524] Jim comments: "The quote appeals to me because it demonstrates the dual nature of the Self, one's inner god power, as both a divine and demonic force within, beyond human morality, capable of possessing and overwhelming consciousness and also challenging the individual to channel this onslaught of instinctual powers to benefit personal growth and creativity."