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James Moura

James Moura

Degrees

  • Ph.D., Community, Liberation, Indigenous, and Eco-Psychologies specialization, Pacifica Graduate Institute

James Moura, Ph.D. is a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Community, Liberation, Indigenous, and Eco-Psychologies specialization (CLIE) at Pacifica Graduate Institute and a professor (at the University of International Integration of Afro-Brazilian Lusophony and Federal University of Ceará, Brazil) and community psychologist working in indigenous and black communities in poverty with youth, adults, and older adults since 2007. He has a strong background in mental health promotion intervention projects, participatory liberation methodologies, participant action research, and decolonial studies, mainly in Latin America. He is a visiting professor at Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Mexico and Pontificia Universidad Católica de Lima, Peru. Professor Moura has been awarded significant national research funding in Brazil (CNPQ, FUNCAP, CAPES, Brazil) and international funding (Fulbright Program, Boston College, USA).). He has also been a consultant and senior researcher for global (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO and International Labor Organization, ILO) and national (Oswaldo Cruz Foundation) organizations for public policy evaluation with qualitative and participatory methodologies. He published a book on psychosocial implications of poverty by Springer in 2019 with critical views on intergenerational community development strategies in impoverished territories. He is currently co-research about the decolonial roots of Community Psychology with professors Christopher Sonn (Victoria University, Australia), Jesica Fernadez (Santa Clara University, US) and Monica Memadyaningrum (Sanata Darma University, Indonesia). Currently, he is developing studies on healing practices and mental health promotion with older adults in Brazil’s indigenous and quilombola (Afro-Brazilian heritage) communities.